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Slavic languages words similarities with Polish


Nojas 4 | 110
6 May 2016  #151
Russian and Polish is not similiar at all.

And that you find many "German" words in Polish has zero to do with WW2. It's because most European languages were influenced by latin during medieval times. French took latin words, Germany took same words from France and countries like Poland and Sweden took the same words from Germany. It was all intermixed, in particular depending on which language was the diplomatic one at the time. Also depending on which language was the fashion among the nobles. Early medieval times it was french, later (in particular during Hansa) it was German.

Water, Vatten, Wasser, Woda.

Maj gadd.
kpc21 1 | 763
6 May 2016  #152
No, in English, the verb position is also always the second one. English is even more strict, because you have to have a subject before it. German is in these terms more similar to Polish, except for this verb-on-the-second-position rule (and subject either just before, or just after that) you can do whatever you want.
Nojas 4 | 110
6 May 2016  #153
And I do not need to be educated about Europe from a Pakistani, being born in north of Europe...

Besides, I'm more than sure that you're better of in UK than Poland being non-european, that's not the question. I only reacted on the "foreigners don't make 4000 pln" since it's common knowledge that foreigners make more than Poles in Poland (because of language, not skill) on average and I've yet to meet a foreigner making less than 5000 pln...
Pakistan_Lahore - | 19
6 May 2016  #154
@Nojas yes tell me about it.

Russian and Polish is not similiar at all. Yes it true, but if you hear Russian than only, many poles told me this.

And that you find many "German" words in Polish has zero to do with WW2

Brother, It has to do with 2nd world war, because German has captured the upper part of Poland, like Danzig, etc and they built many houses, firms, companies, so it starts from there.. Before there were no concept of German language.

If you get a chance to go to the upper part of Poland than you must visit Danzig and her surrounding. They speak few German words like "Fruhstuck" "Dach" while speaking polish. There are some 2400 German words in Polish Language...
Lyzko 20 | 6,340
6 May 2016  #155
Correction. The counting systems in Polish and Russian are nearly identical (as with much of the daily basics in most Slavic aka related languages). The pronunciation is different here, I'll grant you, as is much basic vocab.n but a great deal of the grammar is similar enough:-)
Nojas 4 | 110
6 May 2016  #156
And that you find many "German" words in Polish has zero to do with WW2

Brother, It has to do with 2nd world war, because German has captured the upper part of Poland, like Danzig, etc and they built many houses, firms, companies, so it starts from there.. Before there were no concept of German language.

If you get a chance to go to the upper part of Poland than you must visit Danzig and her surrounding.

So again you show you're quite ignorant about history of Europe... The reason why Gdansk (Polish) have a lot of German influence is because it wasn't always Gdansk, but Danzig (German). Very much like Breslau/Wroclaw. Did you really think that Gdansk was Polish til 1939 and between 1939 and 1945 the German language and businesses was introduced? Gdansk has always been very independent as well, wanting nothing to do with neither "Germany" nor Poland at times.

Being non-European, I suggest you pick up a history book...

Zero to do with WW2.

Lyzko, I know grammar is similiar (they both being on the slavic language tree) but I wouldn't call languages similiar if a native Pole couldn't understand a single word a Russian is saying would you? ;)

Czech and Polish is similiar from what I understand, but not the case between Russian and Polish. My wife doesn't understand a word of Russian.
Pakistan_Lahore - | 19
6 May 2016  #157
@Nojas

And I do not need to be educated about Europe from a Pakistani, being born in north of Europe...

but have knowledge from books or from media only, you never discover Europe. We are foreigner, we look Europe from other way. We went to many parts of Europe, Canada, The US, we know some what how the people are and how they think.

Many European visit Pakistan, India, Nepal, because these countries are exotic and have good Climate. Come to Asia, much cheaper than Poland. You will forget Europe too. As an European, Masters Studies with English speaking you could also earn 2000 Euros in a Month.

I have just copy past it for you :)

Just a short list of the ones I know (some might be dialectal and probably obsolete):

kształt (Gestalt)
malować (malen)
flaszka (Flasche)
urlop (Urlaub)
burmistrz (Bürgermeister)
dach (Dach)
wanna (Wanne)
mebel (Möbel)
tankować (tanken)
szminka (Schminke)
druk (Druck)
plac (Platz)
reszta (Rest)
kumpel (Kumpel)
gwałt (Gewalt)
rura (Rohr)
sznurek (Schnur)
wihajster (Wie heißt er?)
handel (Handel)

from this website:
forum.wordreference.com/threads/german-words-in-polish.2565900/

I went to Danzig and many villages etc, I have already discovered it. German had made many Houses, Firms, Companies, Railways tracks, Bridges etc. Just go there and discover it. Don't trust me. I am a Non-European by the way!
kpc21 1 | 763
6 May 2016  #158
Many words came to Polish from German already in the Middle Ages, in the times of grounding the first towns. WW2 has nothing to do with it.

And I didn't say that Russian is similar to Polish. I have said the grammar of both languages is not much different.

The mentioned German words in Polish are not obsolete. Maybe "kumpel" is not so popular these times.

I got shocked to see people standing on their knees and praying to God.

Well, it's basically what people usually do in a church. In each church.

Sometimes they move on their knees towards the Church.

This is more unusual. But possible.
Pakistan_Lahore - | 19
6 May 2016  #159
And I didn't say that Russian is similar to Polish. I have said the grammar of both languages is not much different.

Here you are right, because I know only a single word "Czesc" means Hi, not more than that :)
InPolska 11 | 1,821
7 May 2016  #160
So you claim you know ONLY one word in Polish but that Polish and Russian grammars are about the same????!!! Funnier and funnier on PF ;);););
delphiandomine 85 | 17,823
7 May 2016  #161
:D From what I know, there's a lot of difficulties with the case system. I've got a Russian friend that speaks excellent Polish, but she makes sometimes very queer mistakes with the cases.
kpc21 1 | 763
7 May 2016  #162
There are differences, but the complexity is similar.

Polish - 7 cases, last one used not so frequently and often replaced by the nominative.
Russian - 6 cases, if you mention someone's name talking to him, you just always use nominative.

The construction of each case and its application may differ, I am not sure how it is (I have studied Russian only for 2 years in primary school), but it doesn't change that.
Lyzko 20 | 6,340
7 May 2016  #163
Indeed, the Polish Vocative essentially no longer exists in present-day Russian! Whereas in Polish, it's used daily, both in speech (Cześć, Krysiu!) as well as writing, in contemporary Russian, I believe I learned years ago that the Vocative is confined to literature:-)

Apropos similarities of Slavic words with Polish, there's Polish "pożar" (fire) vs. Czech "pozor" (danger). Lexically unrelated, but semantically linked.

An endlessly intriguing thread for the Slavic linguist.
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,467
7 May 2016  #164
Funnier and funnier

On otkrył guby i skazał: "U menia nasmork." That is Russian for he opened his mouth and said: "I've got a cold."

In Polish it sounds like. "He uncovered his yap (gęba) and said: I'm full of snot!"

A Pole tried to translate "All quiet on the western front" (which in Polish is: Na Zachodzie bez zmian) into Czech and said: Na zachode ne noviny" (Which in Czech means: no newspapers in the sh*t-house /to wipe with/).
Lyzko 20 | 6,340
7 May 2016  #165
More embarrassing is the Czech vs. Polish distinction between "stały" and "staly" or "zapach" and "zapach":-)

Need I say more?
LOL
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,467
7 May 2016  #166
Need I say more?

But szukać (probably šukat' in Czech) really takes the biscuit!
kpc21 1 | 763
8 May 2016  #167
there's Polish "pożar" (fire) vs. Czech "pozor" (danger).

It has already been explained on the forum that these words don't seem to be connected, Czech "pozor" is rather connected with Polish adjective "pozorny" (apparent), from which you can create a noun "pozor", used mostly in the expression "pozory mylą" (if you assume that something is really such as it seems to be, you may be mistaken).

I think "pozor" in Czech may mean something like "warning" or "attention", because it's always a headline on different safety labels, like "danger! high voltage inside" (in Polish: uwaga! wysokie napięcie wewnątrz) on electrical appliances.
Lyzko 20 | 6,340
8 May 2016  #168
Would the Polish noun though not be "pozÓr" in the singular? Probably just a typo:-)

@Polonius, indeed that could be fatally embarrassing, as could Polish "pukać" vs. Russian "pukat", as doubtless referred to prior on PF!
Crow 143 | 7,520
20 Aug 2016  #169
Merged: Deep symilarity between Polish and Serbian languages - Is Serbian another version of Polish language?

Interesting deep similarity of these two Slavic languages. As if two languages actually represent two versions of one language.

Both have 7 cases for nouns, pronouns, and adjectives, and most words at least amazingly similar: * pies - pas (dog), stol - sto (table), wwóz - uvoz (import), zamarzać - zamrznuti (to freeze), marznąć - mrznuti (to get frozen?), krowa - krava (cow), jeść - jesti (to eat), chód - hod (walk), iść - ići (to walk), sen - san (dream), spać - spavati (to sleep), czytać - čitati (to read), pisać - pisati (to write), głos - glas (voice), pałka - palica (bat), koń - konj (horse), wielki - veliki (big)... * Ja jestem - Ja jesam * Ty jesteś - Ti jesi * On/ona/ono jest - On/ona/ono je... * Idę - idem * Idziesz - ides * Idzie - ide * John ma nowego psa - John ima novog psa

Source: reddit/r/AskReddit/comments/ffhhy/is_serbian_another_version_of_polish_language/
kpc21 1 | 763
21 Aug 2016  #170
No, this similarity shows that both of them are Slavic languages.

Better look at the similarities between Serbian and Croatian. People from those both countries will tell you that they are totally separate languages :)
Lyzko 20 | 6,340
21 Aug 2016  #171
Not even mutually intelligible, Serbian and Polish! Rather like asking whether or not French is "another version" of Italian, or German a dialect of Dutch:-)

A famous Yiddish linguist, Uriel Weinreich, once described the difference between a language and a dialect: "A language is simply a dialect with a navy and an army!"

lol
Ziemowit 12 | 3,390
21 Aug 2016  #172
Not even mutually intelligible, Serbian and Polish!

Many Serbian utterances would be easily intelligible to a Pole. For example: Kako sam bolestan! Imam ja reumu. Or another one: Kad pogledam nase more nase reke, nase gore svu lepotu gde sam rodjena. In the latter only the word 'lepota' is not comprehensible.

youtube.com/watch?v=-jTIhAn_N7U
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,467
21 Aug 2016  #173
German a dialect of Dutch

Low German is pretty close to Dutch!
Crow 143 | 7,520
21 Aug 2016  #174
Many Serbian utterances would be easily intelligible to a Pole.

Exactly. Let us see one more example, thru fragment of one Serbian movie. Spot and listen carefully ... Its easy to understand to any Polish native speaker

Nisam ja lopov gospodjo, ja sam jebac

youtube.com/watch?v=tMi7dQ0bA4o
Lyzko 20 | 6,340
21 Aug 2016  #175
True, Polonius!

@Ziemowit, d'you honestly think the average marginally educated Pole could actually recognize the similarities between those two phrases you quoted?

I'd be quite surprised!
Ziemowit 12 | 3,390
23 Aug 2016  #176
Of course they will do. However, the Kako sam bolestan! phrase standing alone may not be recognized by everyone, although it is pretty likely that - in my view - half of the marginally educated or more could do that. The adjective "bolestan" doeesn't have a Polish equivalent, the closest words in Polish are "boleść" (noun) or "bolesny" and "bolący" (both adjectives). If a person is able to refer either of those to the word "bolestan", they'll be fine. The next phrase: Imam ja reumu, should be easily understandable to every Pole and builds a perfect context for the first phrase to be grasped by those who couldn't grasp its meaning as a stand-alone sentence.

The Polish translation of these two is: [Ależ] wszytko mnie boli! Mam reumatyzm.

I will explain the latter set tomorrow.
Lyzko 20 | 6,340
23 Aug 2016  #177
Curious as to whether or not it should be "wszystko MI boli", since I thought "bolić" requires the Dative:-)
mafketis 17 | 6,908
23 Aug 2016  #178
since I thought "bolić" requires the Dative:-)

It's accusative. I think it was Anna Wierzbicka who pointed out that impersonal expressions that govern the accusative (boleć, nie stać) tend to refer to negative experiences, whereas the dative can be positive, neutral or negative (though less than accusative)
Lyzko 20 | 6,340
23 Aug 2016  #179
Thanks!

Could've sworn I either heard (or read) "Boli mi głowa". Then again, I might have been dreaming, perhaps simply not paying enough attention:-)

"Boleć"!! Of courseLOL
Crow 143 | 7,520
23 Aug 2016  #180
you are all crazy. Poles and Serbians are one and same people. Just, its impossible to keep perfect linguistic similarity in situation when strangers imposing borders between us, deluding us, imposing their culture on us, pollute our world with their schemes, literally fu** us in the brain.


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