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Slavic languages words similarities with Polish


Lyzko 20 | 6,340
23 Aug 2016  #181
Translation, please?

OK, let me try: "Poles and Serbians belong to essentially the same language family. It's only natural that there will be certain similarities in vocabulary what with our borders constantly changing hands......"

Is that about it, Crow? It was hard for me to wade through the thicket of your somewhat 'dense' Serblish prose.
lol
Ziemowit 12 | 3,390
24 Aug 2016  #182
Could've sworn I either heard (or read) "Boli mi głowa".

You could have heard 'boli mie głowa' which, if said quickly, may be heard as 'boli mi głowa'. 'Mnie' can easily be changed into 'mie' in everyday talk and most people (myself included) often, though not always, tend to drop out 'n' in 'mnie'.

Kad pogledam naše more, naše reke, naše gore, svu lepotu gde sam rođena.

[this time in proper Serbian transcription]
Only three word in this sentence may pose a problem for a Polish person without however impeding the comprehension of the whole entity. These are: 'kad', 'svu' and 'lepotu'.

'Pogledam' will be easily associated with "s-poglądać" (cast a glance).
Spoglądać na co? [Na] naše more, naše reke, naše gore --> Na nasze morze, nasze rzeki, nasze góry.
Gde sam rođena --> gdzie jestem (u)rodzona --> gdzie się urodziłam.

'Lepota' is "piękno, splendor, przepych" and this one has to be looked up in a dictionary. I cannot find any reference to a Polish word here except, perhaps, for the root in the comparative and the superlative of the adjective 'dobry': lep-szy; naj-lep-szy.

Tomorrow I will analyse the next part of this song in the context of Polish-Serbian comprehension.
Crow 143 | 7,520
24 Aug 2016  #183
'Lepota' is "piękno, splendor, przepych"

In Serbian `lepota, lepo` (nice) is synonym with `krasno/krasota, sjajno`. When you want to say that is something very nice, you say `prelepo, prekrasno`. In that sense Polish `piękno` stays in relation with Serbian `prekrasno`.

In other Serbian dialects `ljepo`, `lijepo`.
Lyzko 20 | 6,340
24 Aug 2016  #184
Prekrasno = prekrasnoy in Russian, right?
:-)

Always found it intriguing how close the Russians words are for "red" and "beautiful".
Crow 143 | 7,520
24 Aug 2016  #185
By linguists Serbian is in between Polish and Russian. Its logical considering that old core of our civilization was situated in what are now Serbian lands on Danube, Sava and Morava rivers. That zone existed as Sarmatian/Proto Slavic core before Ice age, during and after last glaciation. Core then shifted in what we know as Sarmatia Asiatica. Then, into Great Moravia and Kieven Rus. After that core moved to Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Finally, core zone returned to Serbian lands.

In pre-historic times we know that Sarmatia Europae (togather with core in Serbian lands) had one more core. It was in ancient Arkona.

primary zone of expansion (re-colonization of their old lands) of Proto Slavs (ie Sarmatians/Thracians) after last Ice age, some 12.000 years ago

Then, entire Europe (not only Europe) was populated with Sarmats. Those who would later become Russians, as genetic science confirms, separated from Proto Slavic population in what is now Poland and moved more eastern. At first, they were known as Scythians. Buda who invented Budism was Scythian. But all Sarmats were also in history remembered as Arians or Hyperboreans.

i heard from friend of mine today very interesting thing today, regarding this topic.

Half jokingly he told me story about origin of `PENDRAGON` word/surname among English nobility. Its from Polish PAN-. Listen, story is about one Sarmation who was from region of what is today`s Poland. He was son of some local warlord, had big nose and big penis and was also true master of war-craft, so his battle-brothers called him Dragon (in Pl. Smok). Anyway, story further says that during one night he covertly came to one English lady and had sex with her. He was good, gave a lot of sperm to her and she got son. Now, English as English, ultimately were happy and in memory of that `Smok`, the night `Dragon`, they gave name Uther Pendragon to the child (most of Sarmats that came to Britian back then were from Poland and among them word `Pan` dominated). That Pendragon is English deformation of Pandragon (Pan-dragon). Uther is from `uter, uterati`, what in old Slavic (ie Sarmatian, even in today`s Serbian) means `to penetrate, blow in, enforce`. See, its because of Pan Smok Uterivac/Jebac (ie penetrator). At the end, its not clear who penetrated the lady, that Smok or King Arthur himself (as we know he was also Sarmatian from what is now Dalmatia). But, in any case English got their Pendragon.

ah yes, i forgot to tell you. That lady was a nymphomaniac. So, only good God knows which Pan visited her that erotic night, Arthur or Smok. Maybe even both.
OP Vlad1234 14 | 544
4 Jan 2019  #186
English - Polish - Russian

Brother - Brat, braciuszek - Brat, bratuszka
Satisfied - Zadowolony - Dowolnyj
Father in law - Teść - Tiest'
Mother in law - Teściowa, świekra - Tioszcza, swiekrow'
Son in law - Zięć - Ziat'
Farther - Dalej, dalszy - Daleje, dalsze
Earn - Zarabiać - Zarabatywat'
Imp - Bies - Bies
Avenge - Pomścić, mścić - Mstit'
Put - Położyć, kłaść, postawić - Polożyt', klast', postawit'
Doze - Drzemać - Driemat'
Swarm - Rój - Roj
Hive - Ul - Ulej
Hire - Najem - Najom
Remain - Pozostawać - Ostawliat'

Dwell - Mieszkać - Mieszkat' (archaic)
Or - Albo - Ali, al' (archaic)
Marmot - świstak - swistun (archaic)

Similar meaning (English_Polish - English_Russian)

Ask_Zapytatać - Ask under torture_Pytat'
Chatter_Gadać - Tell fortunes_ Gadat'
gumishu 11 | 4,956
4 Jan 2019  #187
Brother - Brat, braciuszek - Brat, bratuszka

it's ok Vlad, we all know that Russian and Polish have similar vocabulary in their cores - then didn't stop both nations to fight wars though - hopefully we won't see any more of these
OP Vlad1234 14 | 544
4 Jan 2019  #188
it's ok Vlad, we all know that Russian and Polish have similar vocabulary in their cores

All of whom? I suspect many people in Poland are ignorant about that. It would be a shocking discovery to them. I feel many believe that not only Russians but even Ukrainians originally spoke some barbarian Asian language and this is just some borrowings from Polish which made Polish and Ukrainian just a bit similar.

then didn't stop both nations to fight wars though

I hope my efforts may help to prevent anther one.
gumishu 11 | 4,956
4 Jan 2019  #189
All of whom? I suspect many people in Poland are ignorant about

hmm maybe I put too much trust in my fellow Poles - I personally learned Russian in elementary school and was ever since aware of things our languages share (but also in notable differences) - well we should bear in mind that there are now generations of Poles who barely had ever contact with Russian (but my 10-year-old nephew knows cyka-blyat from web-based games :P
Lyzko 20 | 6,340
4 Jan 2019  #190
An elderly Polish acquaintance once told me, "All Poles understand some Russian, but nobody speaks it!"
OP Vlad1234 14 | 544
4 Jan 2019  #191
I personally learned Russian in elementary school and was ever since aware of things our languages share

So, non of the similarities I've posted here is discovery for you? You may not been aware of some archaic words or words with a similar meaning?
gumishu 11 | 4,956
4 Jan 2019  #192
So, non of the similarities I've p

hmm it's not that I knew every single Russian word you posted to be honest - more like about half of them - but I am not surprised with similarities between the two languages
Lyzko 20 | 6,340
4 Jan 2019  #193
If you try to "pukat" at a Russian's front door, thinking you're going to "pukac" as in Poland, you might find your host gently holding their nose:-)
gumishu 11 | 4,956
4 Jan 2019  #194
Vlad I must admit I very much like the Russian language especially it's melodiousness - but I like quite a number of languages for their sound including German

to my embarassment though when I met Russian people in England in the early 2000's most of words that came to my mind while trying to speak Russian were Czech - to my justification after my school years i had almost none contact with your language and instead I watched a lot Czech TV which I preffered to Polish TV stations - I live near the border with the Czech Republic
FromPetrzalka
4 Jan 2019  #195
Unfortunately for me, I am gramatically-challenged when learning languages. I can learn many new words and phrases easily, even if not found in my own native language (e.g. kvinna, pojke) but I struggle with grammar and conjugation of verbs in foreign languages. I've always liked Poland and in a way it already looks like a well-developed country. I like the culture and it's a great place. If I could gasp its grammar I'd gladly learn PL. Unfortunately my native language has lost all cases so to us learning grammar with case systems is hard. Gramatically Swedish looks easier to me lol.
OP Vlad1234 14 | 544
4 Jan 2019  #196
Russian and Bulgarian has many laughable "false friends". I will post them here if someone will show interest and non will find it abusive.
delphiandomine 85 | 17,823
4 Jan 2019  #197
to my justification after my school years i had almost none contact with your language and instead I watched a lot Czech TV

Can you communicate in Czech? I've got some friends who live close to the border, and they're useless in Czech. I even know one girl that lives in Kudowa-Zdrój and she can't put together a grammatically correct sentence in Czech - in her words, the Czechs in the border areas understand Polish and the Poles understand the local Czech dialect, so no-one bothers to actually learn it.
gumishu 11 | 4,956
4 Jan 2019  #198
Can you communicate in Czech?

well i'm not fluent but I can hold a basic conversation even though I haven't practiced in years and it's been long since I watched Czech TV now -we bought a satelite Polsat subsciption and there are no Czech channels in the package - anyway I can understand much more than I can actively would be use in a conversation - but it is similar in all languages I know to some extent including English
gumishu 11 | 4,956
4 Jan 2019  #199
well i'm not fluent but I can hold a basic conversation

do prdele - jsem ted' spadky - pomyslel jsem co ne budu dneska sprchovat
mafketis 17 | 6,908
5 Jan 2019  #200
Czechs in the border areas understand Polish and the Poles understand the local Czech dialect, so no-one bothers to actually learn it

In general Czechs can understand more Polish than Poles understand Czech, possibly because they get much more varied input. There's the difference between colloquial and literary (much bigger than the gap in Polish) and dialects (also more different from each other than Polish dialects) and for generations they regularly heard lots of Slovak...

Poles mostly just hear standard Polish which is convenient in some ways... and not so much in others.

I remember one time overhearing a Czech guy in the Warsaw airport (pre-addition) trying to communicate with a lady in a kiosk... A fine exercise in futility. I gave up on buying whatever I had gone for and thought I'd just let nature takes its course.
OP Vlad1234 14 | 544
5 Jan 2019  #201
Czechs are a unique nation who regardless hundreds of years of Austrian/German rule and cultural influence and large Celtic/Germanic admixtures managed to preserve generous Slavic humor, Slavic beauty and Slavic language more or less free from foreign borrowings which was resurrected from obliviation. They have a unique Slavic culture which also absorbed many features from German/Western culture such a cleanness and accuracy, high quality and sometimes extreme emancipation/frivolousness (by Russian or Polish standards). There are many laughable false friends between Russian and Czech. For example:

English - Czech - Russian interpretation

Attention! Police is watching! - Pozor! Policie varuje! - Shame! Police is stealing!

To be continued...
gumishu 11 | 4,956
5 Jan 2019  #202
varovat means to warn in Czech as far as I can recall
OP Vlad1234 14 | 544
5 Jan 2019  #203
Always found it intriguing how close the Russians words are for "red" and "beautiful".

No it's the same in Russian, at least when it is an adverb.

Modern word for beauty in Russian is "krasota", an archaic is "krasa" while "red" in Russian is "krasnyj".
Lyzko 20 | 6,340
5 Jan 2019  #204
The Czechs were far kinder to their Jews en masse than either the Poles, the Hungarians, certainly the Rumanians, even the Russians.
Only the Albanians and the Bulgarians appeared to do what was necessary NOT to curry favor with Germany.

Aside from false friends I've mentioned, Czech seems closest to Polish:-)
OP Vlad1234 14 | 544
7 Jan 2019  #205
I forgot the most important

English - Polish - Russian

Food - Jedzenie - Jeda
Lyzko 20 | 6,340
7 Jan 2019  #206
How about

English Polish Russian

time czas/godzina vremya

Cf. What time is it? - Ktora jest godzina? - Katory tjas
:-)
OP Vlad1234 14 | 544
7 Jan 2019  #207
time czas/godzina vremya

In Polish czas=time, in Russian czas=hour. In Polish godzina=hour, in Russian god=year and "godina" is an archaic word used for some abstract period of time.
Lyzko 20 | 6,340
7 Jan 2019  #208
Much as "vremya" no longer has an extant equivalent in Polish. "Vremie" is Old Polish, I seem to recall.
OP Vlad1234 14 | 544
7 Jan 2019  #209
wriemia=time in Russian. In Serbian, Bulgarian time=wriemie.
Lyzko 20 | 6,340
7 Jan 2019  #210
Wasn't aware of that, thanks:-)


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