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Slavic languages words similarities with Polish


OP Vlad1234 18 | 1,058
8 Jan 2019 #211
"Vremie" is Old Polish, I seem to recall.

Which other words from Old Polish can you recall?
Lyzko 37 | 8,549
8 Jan 2019 #212
None right off the top of my head, but Mickiewicz is chocked full of arcane forms:-)
Crow 160 | 10,261
21 Sep 2020 #213
Let us prepare ourselves to inevitable Union in Central-European Union

Zestawienie językowe: j.polski, słowacki, czeski, serbski

>>> youtube.com/watch?v=ojqEYSWY6Xc
OP Vlad1234 18 | 1,058
23 Sep 2020 #214
In my opinion the largest disadvantages of Slavic languages:
1) Many words are long and sometimes difficult to pronounce.
2) A lot of consonants.
3) A lot of "r", "sh", "sch".
I would say they sound more melodic than majority of Germanic languages, but less melodic than Romance languages. Do you think a reform is needed?
pawian 197 | 19,901
23 Sep 2020 #215
1) Many words are long and sometimes difficult to pronounce.

Hey, I know such a word! Ekstraordynaryjny - 7 syllables.

2) A lot of consonants.

Yes, gżegżółka.

3) A lot of "r", "sh", "sch".

Yes, my business partner 20 years ago was called Szaszkiewicz.

Do you think a reform is needed?

Yes, but let it be natural, not forced.
Ziemowit 14 | 4,404
24 Sep 2020 #216
Do you think a reform is needed?

There's a lot more discrepancy between pronouncing and spelling in French or English and both of them have been surviving in very good shape.
pawian 197 | 19,901
24 Sep 2020 #217
There's a lot more discrepancy between pronouncing and spelling in French or English

yes, and they both have long words, too. E.g., I remember one - extraordinaire - 5 syllables. Extraordinary - 6 syllables.
kowal223
19 Dec 2021 #218
English - Polish - Ukrainian - Slovak

Mister - Pan - Pan - Pán

As a Pole, I personally feel a strong aversion towards the Ukrainian language (and Belarusian too) and feel worry that it has so many West Slavic borrowings to the point it's no longer intelligible with Russian. I can accept many loanwords we imported into Ukrainian but for some reason I just cannot accept the fact that they even borrowed the word "pan" (lord/mister). "Pan" is a word that defines us, Western Slavs, very much. This word is completely alien in the rest of Slavic languages, but it somewhat got into Ukrainian. East Slavs used to call us, Poles, "polskie pany" (or something like that) and now they use this word to call themselves that. Please, Ukrainians, get rid of this word and start using "gospodin" or something like that.
Lenka 3 | 2,888
19 Dec 2021 #219
As a Pole, I personally feel a strong aversion towards the Ukrainian language

As a Pole, I personally feel no averaion towards the Ukranian language.
mafketis 35 | 11,201
19 Dec 2021 #220
Good, a sign of mental health!
jon357 71 | 19,994
20 Dec 2021 #221
This word is completely alien in the rest of Slavic languages, but it somewhat got into Ukrainian

Languages always borrow from each other and linguistic trends are always changing. No language is timeless, none are unchanging.

Polish borrows words from other languages (whether Slavonic or from other groups) all the time, has done so for centuries, is doing so now, and will do so in the future, possibly at a far faster rate than before.
OP Vlad1234 18 | 1,058
20 Dec 2021 #222
Please, Ukrainians, get rid of this word and start using "gospodin" or something like that.

There was time when Poles used gospodzin as well. But Russians and Serbs didn't make any claims to Poles regarding this. Everithing is changing.

Polish knights chanted Bogurodzica prior to their engagement at the Battle of Grunwald:
"Bogurodzica dziewica, Bogiem sławiena Maryja!
U twego syna Gospodzina Matko zwolena, Maryja"
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bogurodzica

Moreover Ukrainians use expression "szanownie panstwo" - a respectful community.

gospodzin (język polski)
znaczenia:
rzeczownik, rodzaj męskoosobowy

(1.1) st.pol. gospodarz, pan
pl.wiktionary.org/wiki/gospodzin
Lyzko 37 | 8,549
20 Dec 2021 #223
Perhaps not quite germain, but I heard from a Russian acquaintance that immediately during early Glasnost, it was usual in Russia to hear "gospodin" and "gospozha" when referring, resp. to "Mr." and "Mrs.". This later was briefly replaced by "garazhin" for "citizen" when addressing strangers or in similarly formal encounters. Is this true?
OP Vlad1234 18 | 1,058
20 Dec 2021 #224
Word for citizen in Russian is "grazhdanin", not "garazhin". It originated from Slavic word "grad" - a settlement. Russians rarely use words gospodin or grazhdanin in a daily life. More often in official use. When they need to refer to someone in public transport or supermarket they will use more comonly something like: "a man", "a woman", "a girl", "a lad", boy, oldma, etc.
Lyzko 37 | 8,549
20 Dec 2021 #225
Makes perfect sense, Vlad. Thanks:-)
In French and German too, "citizen" relates to the word for citadel or fort, as those who defend their ramparts.
Miloslaw 14 | 4,508
20 Dec 2021 #226
@Vlad1234

I thought Russians prefered the communist term Comrad.....
OP Vlad1234 18 | 1,058
20 Dec 2021 #227
Majority of Russians have no even idea what word "comrad" means. During "communist" party rule the official was "towariszcz"'. It means basically the same as in Polish, - "a fellow", "companion". But it started to gain use even before October revolution, after February revolotion, during provisionary govt.
Lyzko 37 | 8,549
21 Dec 2021 #228
For the majority of Europeans in general, any time before 2000 is like ancient history, so astronomically short is their memory!
It's frightening really.

Recently met several Germans under thirty who only vaguely knew of (or worse, even cared about) the Fall of the Wall and the impact of the collapse of Communism. All three though had relatively well-paying banking jobs in Frankfurt aka Bankfurt or"Mainhattan", yet couldn't converse on even the lowest historical-cultural level...in English OR German LOL
OP Vlad1234 18 | 1,058
21 Dec 2021 #229
To Lyzko:
Are you a German? Which Slavic languages do you know and why you study them?
Lyzko 37 | 8,549
21 Dec 2021 #230
To Vlad: I'm American of German-speaking descent and Polish, later Russian, I studied at graduate school in my late 2O's while obtaining my doctorate in the psychology of second language acquisition and adult pedagogy. Are you Russian or Romanian, like Vlad Tepes?
OP Vlad1234 18 | 1,058
22 Dec 2021 #231
I was born in Ukraine, but now live in Canada for a longer time that I lived in Ukraine.
Lyzko 37 | 8,549
22 Dec 2021 #232
Do you know Russian and Ukrainian with equal facility?
OP Vlad1234 18 | 1,058
22 Dec 2021 #233
I can understand 99.9% in Ukrainian, but would have difficulty to write a story in marvelously rich Ukrainian. Probably not all people know their language well enough to express themselves in poetically rich language. So, maybe Russian slightly easier. I've read far more literature in Russian than in Ukrainian in my life.
Lyzko 37 | 8,549
27 Dec 2021 #234
False friends abound in closely related languages, in Germanic, Romance too, as well as Slavic:-)
Novichok 3 | 6,771
27 Dec 2021 #235
in poetically rich language.

...meant to confuse and manipulate to get laid?
Lyzko 37 | 8,549
27 Dec 2021 #236
No, but to communicate-:)
OP Vlad1234 18 | 1,058
7 Feb 2022 #237
So yes, Polish is far closer to Russian than even Dutch to German.

Why in this case they believe that we (Estern Slavs) are beasts of the forest? Joke.
Oathbreaker 4 | 474
7 Feb 2022 #238
@Vlad1234
The language isn't a barrier, it's what the language and more accurately the accent reminds of past actions (trauma)

When the Russian Federation adjusts it's geo strategy to current realities, things can move on.

Example: need for naval bases (Crimea, Kaliningrad, Marmunsk and Petersburg) was for the purpose of being able to control (apply taxes, tariff etc) and use maritime trade. Very similar to how Denmark was controlling trade in the Baltic.

Nowadays it's not as profitable as navy has become far more expensive and products from Russia has changed from valuable pelts and furs to gas, oil and precious metals.

Gas/oil transported by railway/pipes makes the need for a navy quite redundant unless such pipelines are made at sea and in harms danger due to possible sabotage. (Which useally happens via hack attacks and not by commandoes/sabotours.)

So creating schools for the purpose of promoting digital activities (digital currencies, digitally made art, digital tools, digital control of on-the-ground military vehicles/equipment, digital platforms, digital markets, creation of hardware)

Wouldn't only be groundbreaking and opens up the possibility of attracting interest but, also to recruit the best for hacking/military/intelligence purposes

Also improving infrastructure for trade from China would give a huge advantage to Russia cause of her landmass connecting China with Europe and improving it as much as possible, so as to make any other trade routes redundant and more costly compared to Russian infrastructure. Alas due to Russian paranoia and need for security a common tactic is to slowly improve it's infrastructure as to complicate possible enemy logistics


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