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Polish and other Slavic nobility in our time


Crow 137 | 7,595
12 Jun 2010  #1
this is summer thread, relaxing.

i am very curious is there eventually some active representative of Polish nobility in our time. Will you help me to found out? Anyone?

i am especially interested in Polish sources in Polish and in English language
Seanus 15 | 19,706
12 Jun 2010  #2
Why does nobility interest you, Crow? Where's the appeal? It can create false people when you see peasants parading around like they are nobility. Poles often forget their former nobles, this much has been told to me quite a few times by Poles.
OP Crow 137 | 7,595
12 Jun 2010  #3
Seanus

Sean, do you have some info on any existing Polish nobility?
Seanus 15 | 19,706
12 Jun 2010  #4
No, I'm afraid not. I imagine that there is plenty online, though.
1jola 14 | 1,879
12 Jun 2010  #5
The Radziwiłł family

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radziwi%C5%82%C5%82_family

is still very active in this organization:

chivalricorders.org/orders/smom/maltpold.htm
Gregrog 4 | 100
12 Jun 2010  #6
Bronisław Komorowski comes from noble family. His coat of arms is Korczak.
OP Crow 137 | 7,595
12 Jun 2010  #7
The Radziwiłł family

is still very active in this organization:


Radziwiłł

Radziwiłł

nice Coat of Arms

e, hvala ti. /e, thank you/. Especial thanks for links. This is kind of info that i want :)

please provide more info
Seanus 15 | 19,706
12 Jun 2010  #8
All I can contribute, Crow, is to say that names ending in -ski tend to be more noble. Resident Poles will no doubt help you more.
1jola 14 | 1,879
12 Jun 2010  #9
We don't have enough land to account for all our landed gentry. LOL
OP Crow 137 | 7,595
12 Jun 2010  #10
i founded images >>>

Philip Radziwill with his wife Devon

News are really fresh...

Devon Schuster Marries Her Prince, Philip Radziwill In First Fairytale Wedding of 2010

If New York seemed too quiet this month it's because everyone skipped town for chicer climes. We've been covering the Sundance scene and now turn our attention to the glamorous Alps, where Derek Blasberg tweeted from the top o' the mountain and attended the wedding of Vogue's Devon Schuster to childhood sweetheart Philip Radziwill in the first fairytale wedding of 2010.

The wedding took place on January 15 and 16 in Gstaad, Switzerland, at a chalet belonging to the family of Radziwill, and lasted well into the night (as all good weddings should). As for the guest list, imagine all the cool lunch tables in the high school cafeteria converging on one dance floor. Besides Derek and the equally chatty Lyle Maltz were Minnie Mortimer, Lauren and Andres Santo Domingo,Bettina Prentice, and Devon's fellow Voguettes Meredith Melling Burke and Sylvana Soto-Ward.

Devon is a Vogue staffer, and Philip, grandson of Prince Stanislaw Albrecht Radziwill who was once married to Jacqueline Kennedy's sister Lee, is a London-born banker. They registered at Tiffany, Bloomingdale's, and Williams Sonoma and have a wedding website hosted by Wedding Channel.

Congratulations to the happy couple!


Devon Schuster Radziwill and friends

Devon Schuster Radziwill

but see this...

Radziwil Poland

Lee Radziwill - formerly wife of Stanisław Albrecht Radziwiłł

thepeakofchic.blogspot.com/2008/06/lees-timeless-design.html

It goes without saying that many people have long been fascinated with Jackie Onassis- no surprise there. But Jackie's sister Lee Radziwill is also a style icon, albeit one who still stands in the shadow of her more famous sister. Certainly Radziwill is known for her keen fashion sense, but she seems to be quite confident in how she chooses to live (I'm talking about the actual interiors of her homes- NOT her personal life!).

R2

The dining room of Radziwill's country house Turville Grange c. 1971. The walls were covered in Sicilian scarves that had been lacquered. Painted panels were superimposed over the scarves. If this was not designed by Mongiardino, it certainly looks it.

The garden room of Turville Grange certainly had an English country house feel, but some of the furniture gave it a modern twist.

R4

The front hall at Turville Grange, again c. 1971

R5

The dining room of Radziwill's Fifth Avenue apartment, c. mid-1970s. The walls were covered in silk moire. Don't you think the Regency dining chairs and pedestal table are stunning?

I think this is one of my favorite rooms in Radziwill's New York apartment.

R7

The drawing room was also a vision in red.

Lee Radziwill: A Tribute

after all, this is about GLAMOUR

Stanisław Albrecht Radziwiłł

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanis%C5%82aw_Albrecht_Radziwi%C5%82%C5%82

Stanisław Albrecht "Stash" Radziwiłł (21 July 1914 - 27 July 1976) was a Polish former prince, born in Szpanów, Poland..

Marriages

For the third time, he was married on 19 March 1959, in Fairfax, Virginia, to Caroline Lee Bouvier Canfield (1933-); they divorced in 1974. They had two children, Anthony Radziwill (married Carole Ann DiFalco) and Anna Christina Radziwill (Mrs Ottavio Arancio).

Drac90 1 | 74
13 Jun 2010  #11
Radziwiłł

traitors :) this is how majority of poles think when see this surname :) and they were lithuanian nobility not polish :)
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
13 Jun 2010  #12
Less known about the Polish nobility is that there were plenty of impoverished ennobled peasants. For their service to theh country (usually miliatry service or defending the lord's castle) especially in the poor Podlasie region entire villages were ennobled. They may have been barefoot but in stirrups and tilled the hard-scrabble soil like their peasant neighbours, but had a coat of arms and a sword and could say: Szlachcic na zagrodzie równy wojewodzie (A farming gentleman is the equal of any voivod/governor).
Ironside 48 | 9,708
13 Jun 2010  #13
For their service to theh country (usually miliatry service or defending the lord's castle) especially in the poor Podlasie region entire villages were ennobled.

it wasn't quite so,
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
13 Jun 2010  #14
Please elaborate and tell us what things were really like.
southern 75 | 7,097
13 Jun 2010  #15
entire villages were ennobled

Nobles with tractors?
1jola 14 | 1,879
13 Jun 2010  #16
A friend of mine is a count and from a distingushed noble family, but unfortunately he is doing time in Wrocław for heroin smuggling. Any more about that would ruin Crow's summer fun thread.
southern 75 | 7,097
13 Jun 2010  #17
Can you imagine "my gram Herr Baron?"
jeden - | 226
13 Jun 2010  #18
Polish nobility is quite different than european or other.

Maybe you asked about aristocracy, like Potoccy ( they live in Krakow now) etc.

Becouse , Poland is plenty of families with nobile roots. ( My mother family is, my grandmother also)

Can you imagine "my gram Herr Baron?"

My mother sometimes says to her mother " Pani Matko" ofc. rather for fun ...
Bratwurst Boy 5 | 9,724
13 Jun 2010  #19
If nobles, aristocracy become such a great number of a people they stop to be noble aristocracy in the sense it is meant to be.
jeden - | 226
13 Jun 2010  #20
So I said that we have rather other meaning of word "nobile" than in western countries.

For example Polish nobility was about 10 -12% of all society, in France it was max. 1-2%
Ironside 48 | 9,708
13 Jun 2010  #21
Please elaborate and tell us what things were really like.

Well, in the most cases of compact nobles settlement was a result of dividing land to all children (often 6 or more) and even large area could become "patchy" in two generations.

For their service to theh country (usually miliatry service or defending the lord's castle) especially in the poor Podlasie region entire villages were ennobled.

I don't know instances when entire village was ennobled. Peasants were ennobled for military services but mostly they had to be recruited from Royal domain. In all such cases status of a noble were usually granted to individuals.

Only exceptions were made for Tatars, when their regiment had been ennobled en mass to ensure their military service on the Polish side, but it was more likely in Duchy than in Crown.
OP Crow 137 | 7,595
13 Jun 2010  #22
Bronisław Komorowski comes from noble family. His coat of arms is Korczak.

true. You are right, man is of noble origin. Very interesting

Bronisław Komorowski

Bronisław Komorowski - Acting President of Poland - Incumbent

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bronis%C5%82aw_Komorowski

Bronisław Maria Komorowski, of Clan Korczak (born 4 June 1952) is the Acting President of Poland. When Lech Kaczyński, the President of Poland, died in a plane crash on 10 April 2010, presidential powers and duties automatically transferred to Komorowski because he was Marshal of the Sejm (Speaker of Parliament). His position as Acting President is temporary, and Komorowski remains in his role as Speaker, at least until a presidential election can be held. Komorowski is also the Civic Platform government's presidential candidate in that election, due to be held on 20 June 2010.

Russian Nobility of Today

Wednesday February 22, 2006
goeasteurope.about/b/2006/02/22/russian-nobility-of-today.htm

BBC offers this video news.bbc.co.uk/nolavconsole/ifs_news/hi/newsid_4720000/newsid_472 8800/nb_rm_4728800.stm
highlighting how the descendents of the Tsars--and the nouveau riche of Russia and abroad--are looking back to Imperial Russia for inspiration to create identities in post-Communist Russia. Because most everyone who was alive during the last reign of the Romanovs survive now in the genes of their grandchildren, the titled nobles can imitate but a perception of the Russia that existed before Nicholas II was deposed. Is this romantic, pathetic, or something else? Share your thoughts about the heirs of the Russian throne in the forum or start a discussion on a topic of your choice.

Russian Nobility Association in America

The Annual Russian Nobility Ball, at the Pierre Hotel, New York City
May 14th, 2010

russiannobility.org

The Russian Nobility Association was incorporated in America in 1938. It is a non-political, non-profit organization. Its aims are philanthropic and genealogical.

RNA BALL IN HOUSTON, TEXAS

It is our pleasure to announce that the First Russian Nobility Ball in Texas, on the 10th of November, 2006, preceded by the Pre-Ball Reception (on the 9th of November, 2006) at Mr. L. Hokanson and Mr. M. Siller's Russian House in Houston, were complete and astounding SUCCESS!!!

Russian Nobility Ball 2010
by Raphael Pungin
vimeo.com/11862794
Mr Grunwald 19 | 1,542
13 Jun 2010  #23
do you have some info on any existing Polish nobility?

You mean like nobilty, Aristocrats, or family's with rich titles?

My family come from a Polish/German poor noble family
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
13 Jun 2010  #24
Those who read Polish may enjoy learning about the barfoot, backwater gentry (szlachta zaściankowa) of the Podlasie region.
jamiolkowski.pl/korzenie/mpmmp.html
OP Crow 137 | 7,595
14 Jun 2010  #25
You mean like nobilty, Aristocrats, or family's with rich titles?

yes, yes

My family come from a Polish/German poor noble family

really? nice

what i know, in my family line/Clan nobody was promoted to nobility

But, our family tree remembered one occasion. That is, in time of Austro-Hungaria, brother of my grand grandfather abandoned Dalmatia and Lika because of work and settled in what is today`s Hungary. After a while he married to a Hungarian Countess from Carpathian region. Family data also recorded that, what was very unusual and interesting, his wife Countess, together with her family name and title took his (our) family name, too after married to my grand grand cousin.

As i know, even today, in Hungary lives those my distant cousins and still are bearers of our family name together with their other name and title.

That`s, what i know, our only connection with nobility in family. There are some other stories inside of family but, they are on the level of rumors so never mind.
Ironside 48 | 9,708
14 Jun 2010  #26
Those who read Polish

there is difference between knights and nobles, its seems that for you is a vague difference.
When you talk about ennobling it means you are taking about times after knights era.
Mr Grunwald 19 | 1,542
14 Jun 2010  #27
yes, yes

ahha

Well at some point from my grandparents I come from the family of Grunwald and Pacewicz (both noble family's)

Reason I said Polish-German is because they have always felt Polish but with Lithuanian ancestry so it's irrelevant if I say I am half Lithuanian really. (Pacewicz-Pacevicius)

From the Grunwald side there is the family of Schultz (later Szulc), although from the Grunwald side there was pretty many Emil's and one of them took part in a Polish uprising either in Listopadowe or Styczniowe (Polish months). Either how the GRUNWALD family got their nobility status from either the battle of Grunwald OR from one of those uprisings for taking part of it. (I am not sure)

Although one of the reasons why my granddad's father wasn't jailed was because during ww2 the Germans said, "Oh your family come from the family Schultz, you German!"

then he responded "No Sir, I am Polish"

That way he didn't become Volksdeutsche, also considering he took part in the Warsaw uprising and got wounded and sent to a Concentration camp in Western Germany. He got liberated by the Americans later on but out of need to know how his family is doing and that he was responsible for taking care of his own family he returned back to Poland. The family had always a tough time during the commie times in Poland, on Pacewicz side they lost all their estate and had to move to Warsaw. (the estate was in Lublin)

Since my family had noble ties they didn't get to have it easy in commie Poland. But they weren't "hunted" since they didn't go much into politics or underground parties or something. Until Solidarity movement in 1980's.

We have a coat of arms but it's at my grandmother's place, as she lives in Poland and I live in Norway I can't show it at the moment. But if anyone would be interested I can ask her to take a photo and mail it to me.
hague1cmaeron 14 | 1,377
14 Jun 2010  #28
Franciszek Ksawery Branicki:

Opponent of the reforms of the Great Sejm (1788-1792), supporter of the Targowica Confederation. Sentenced to death in absentia by the Supreme Criminal Court during the Kościuszko Uprising (1794). He also fought a duel with the infamous Casanova, in which both were wounded but survived.

duel as depicted by youtube:

youtube.com/watch?v=G1vv44OckR4&feature=related

as described by Casanova himself:
books.google.com.au/books?id=-0F8CRLDPv4C&pg=PA423&lpg= PA423&dq=branicki+Casanowa&source=bl&ots=G4GsdkdIyc&sig=MsqHnRIEJdtFjN qwZD

Sounds like an interesting scoundrel this Branicki.
Mr Grunwald 19 | 1,542
14 Jun 2010  #29
Opponent of the reforms of the Great Sejm (1788-1792), supporter of the Targowica Confederation. Sentenced to death in absentia by the Supreme Criminal Court during the Kościuszko Uprising (1794).

I would have dueled him with pleasure ;)
hague1cmaeron 14 | 1,377
14 Jun 2010  #30
That makes the two of us, you would face him from the front and in the meantime i would shoot him in the back:)


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