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What do Poles owe to Germans?


OP pawian 159 | 9,553
12 Sep 2011  #91
have you titled this thread " what Germans have done good to Poland" it would have been different matter.

I don`t think so. Trolls would come anyway and trash the topic with Nazi crimes and other stuff which suits another thread.

ou choose to title it provocative you have people being angry.

It is their problem, not mine. I was taught at psychology class that you should control your anger because it is absolutely your fault if you can`t.

way to go

Yes. Sinatra sang: I did it my way. Regrets, I've had a few

I can say: I did it my way and I regret nothing!

=sascha]e, i am far away from trolling.

Ok, then be good and join the thread with valuable input instead of rants how boring it is etc.

What do you know about German settlers in Poland in early times?

Germans settled rich Polish areas which were vastly devastated by Tartars in 13 century. Settlers rebuilt these lands and developed in German style. They created Little Germany in Poland, had their own laws, even coins. Their presence exerted a great influence on Polish life in all its spheres, so great that it continued into modern times.

German Settlements in Poland

[....] A great number of German peasants, who, during the interregnum following the death of Friedrich II Hohenstaufen, suffered great oppression at the hands of their lords, were induced to settle in Poland under certain very favorable conditions. German immigration into Poland had started spontaneously at an earlier period, about the end of the XI century, and was the result of overpopulation in the central provinces of the Empire. Advantage of the existing tendency had already been taken by the Polish Princes in the XIIth century for the development of cities and crafts. Now the movement became intensified.[....]

Read the whole article here: freepages.history.rootsweb.com/~koby/political/chapter_03/03declinemonarch.html

Fascinating.
Ironside 48 | 9,721
12 Sep 2011  #92
I don`t think so. Trolls would come anyway and trash the topic with Nazi crimes and other stuff which suits another thread.

Admit your mistake and be over with those pathetic excuses which convinced nobody !
OP pawian 159 | 9,553
12 Sep 2011  #93
:):):):):):)

Go on, post more bullcrap, laughter is the best medicine, I will save on doctors. :):):):)

PS. Iron, I expect more sophisticated stuff from you than that. E.g., try to prove that Germans didn`t exert great influence on Poland in Middle Ages.

Will you? :):):):)
Palivec - | 380
16 Sep 2011  #94
Poles owe nothing to Germans, that's for sure. Better ask how Poland was influenced by Germany. How about:
- German town law
The medieval settlement structure in Poland was imported from Germany. Even today many municipal structures are based on it.
- Sachsenspiegel
This legal code was used in many parts of medieval Poland
- modern book printing
Obviously most printers who introduced book printing to Poland were Germans
- Brick Gothic
From Luebeck via the Hanseatic League to Poland
southern 75 | 7,097
16 Sep 2011  #95
Poland owes to Germany Auschwitz camp one of the most popular attractions visited every year by hundreds of thousands tourists bringing hard currency.
peterweg 36 | 2,316
16 Sep 2011  #96
hard currency.

What currency is 'hard'?
Palivec - | 380
16 Sep 2011  #97
Poland owes to Germany Auschwitz camp one of the most popular attractions visited every year by hundreds of thousands tourists bringing hard currency.

And this:

this:

3
stupiditybuster
16 Sep 2011  #98
[quote=Sokrates Genocide of Gdańsk, renaming it Danzing and claiming its a german city.[/quote]

for the most part of its history, it was a German city. Even when it was associated with Poland 1466–1772, they spoke German (low Prussian) .ttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low_Prussian.
sascha 1 | 826
16 Sep 2011  #99
What currency is 'hard'?

D mark ;)

Poland owes to Germany Auschwitz camp one of the most popular attractions visited every year by hundreds of thousands tourists bringing hard currency.

u can of course put it also that way.

still the prupose of this thread is not clear to me. i think it can more provoke bad associations than anything else. maybe the author can explain a little. :)
gumishu 11 | 5,012
16 Sep 2011  #100
D mark ;)

yes, quite hard ... to find nowadays :P
joepilsudski 26 | 1,389
16 Sep 2011  #101
What do Poles owe to Germans?

Nothing except the hand of friendship.
PlasticPole 7 | 2,649
16 Sep 2011  #102
joepilsudski

Nothing except the hand of friendship.

They don't even owe them that.
Natasa 1 | 580
16 Sep 2011  #103
Subject and object in the sentence that makes the title of this thread are in mess.
OP pawian 159 | 9,553
16 Sep 2011  #104
Sigh!

The aim of this topic is not to teach grammar or stylistics, so can you keep your musings about titles to yourself? You are wasting our time.

=Palivec]- modern book printing
Obviously most printers who introduced book printing to Poland were Germans

Interesting. I had little knowledge about it.

Indeed, the first print on Polish soil was perpetrated by a German:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kasper_Straube

Kasper Straube (also Kaspar[1][2] or Caspar[3], also known as The Printer of the Turrecrematas) was a German 15th century printer from Bavaria.
He was active in Cracow between 1473 and 1477, decades before Johann Haller. His Latin almanac Calendarium cracoviense (Cracovian Calendar) of 1473[4] is regarded as the first work printed in Poland.[5]

Other surviving printed works by Straube include:
Juan de Torquemada: Explanatio in Psalterium
Franciscus de Platea: Opus restitutionum usurarum et excommunicationum
Augustine of Hippo: Opuscula (de doctrina christiana, de praedestinatione sanctorum)


Also, the first printing house was set and run by a German, and the first print in the Polish language was done by a German too.

The first print written in Polish language is believed to be Hortulus Animae polonice, a Polish version of Hortulus Animae written by Biernat of Lublin, printed and published in 1513 by Florian Ungler in Kraków. The last known copy was lost during World War II.

One of the first commercial printers in Poland is considered to be Johann Haller[3] who worked in Cracow in the early 16th century (since 1505) who in 1509 printed Nicolaus Copernicus Theophilacti Scolastici Simocatti Epistole morales, rurales at amatoriae, interpretatione latina.

Other well known early printers in Poland are:
Hieronymus Vietor from Silesia who worked in Vienna and Kraków
Printers from the Szafenberg family,
Florian Ungler
In the late 16th century there were 7 printing shops in Kraków, and in 1610 10 printing shops. A decline started in around 1615. Due to this fact in 1650 there remained only 3 secular printing shops, accompanied by a few ecclesial ones.


More: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_printing_in_Poland
sascha 1 | 826
17 Sep 2011  #105
The aim of this topic is not to teach grammar or stylistics, so can you keep your musings about titles to yourself?

i see that u r a serious guy. no humor then? a sarcastic spproach is also allowed. :)

You are wasting our time.

until now nothing 'breathtaking' from ur side in this thread. nothing new. so just a projection of urs?? ;)
OP pawian 159 | 9,553
17 Sep 2011  #106
=sascha]until now nothing 'breathtaking' from ur side in this thread. nothing new. ;)

Don`t be silly and stop pretending an expert. Most of the things, if not all, talked about here, were completely unknown to you.

Instead of thanking me for the chance to get acquainted with practical info which you might use in the future for your benefit, you are grumbling.

I regret to say it nut your attitude is infantile.
:):):):)

=sascha] a sarcastic spproach is also allowed. :)

Wow! Thanks!!! )::):)

BTW, you are not the most brilliant German on this continent, are you?

OK, let it be so.

:):):):)
sascha 1 | 826
17 Sep 2011  #107
BTW, you are not the most brilliant German on this continent, are you?

thanks for the blumen. of course i am not. just reflecting my personal experiences in these kind of threads with pol-ger topics. thats it.

what kind of schulmeister are you dude? step down from ur horse and breathe normal air. of course i dont know 'all' about pol-ger. thats normal. r u familiar will of ur country's history and neighbors?

schulmeisterei and too much seriousness are that what i am marking. schonen abend noch.
OP pawian 159 | 9,553
17 Sep 2011  #108
schulmeisterei and too much seriousness are that what i am marking. schonen abend noch.

Does it mean you are going to leave this thread alone at last? :):):):) If you have nothing interesting to say, why do you keep coming back and trolling?

just reflecting my personal experiences in these kind of threads with pol-ger topics. thats it.

Don`t you realise that your fekking experiences are totally unimportant in the thread which deals with Polish German past? Are you really so dumb or you are still pretending?

You and all other brilliant ones, understand one thing - Great History is not about personal experiences.

what kind of schulmeister are you dude?

I am the kind of a teacher who dislikes bullcrap from students and I never forget to tell them that. Here is a sign which hangs in my classroom:

A48_no-bullshit.jpg

That is why I am telling you: stop crapping this thread.

I value serious contribution in such serious threads. :):):):):):)

The Polish language borrowed abundantly from German.

A few examples:
The German language also influenced Polish and other Slavic languages, for example kajuta from German Kajüte for (ship) cabin, sztorm from German Sturm for storm, burmistrz from German Bürgermeister for mayor, szynka from German Schinken for ham, or handel from German Handel for trade.

In Polish, szlafmyca from German Schlafmütze means night cap, but - as in German - also used in a figurative sense as sleepyhead. Szlafrok from German Schlafrock is a dressing-gown.

A Polish craftsman uses a śruba (screw, from German Schraube) and klajster (paste/glue from German Kleister). If he does not know the name of his tool, he may ask for a wihajster (thingamabob, from German Wie heißt er?, literally how is it called?). And will receive the requested thing:

Podaj mi ten mały wihajster! (Please give me the small thingamabot!)

There is also the word fajrant (leisure-time, from German Feierabend). In a carousal, he can drink to someone bruderszaft (from German Bruderschaft, fraternity) and disband with a rausz (from German Rausch, inebriation).


The list of borrowings:
he main time borrowing from German is for the period XIII-XVI., When cities get official legal status, and they are made a new cities, based on the Magdeburg law, ie. Under German law. So these are the words associated with the city, and construction law.

pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Germanizm

Here is a nice article but in Polish:

The total amount of Germanisms oscillates around 3-4 thousand, the majority of them being old and very old ones, especially from Medieval times.
Wroclaw 44 | 5,388
17 Sep 2011  #109
The German language also influenced Polish and other Slavic languages

Polish sign language comes directly from German sign language. not that it helps me as i have limited use of ASL.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
17 Sep 2011  #110
So you feel that those words somehow filled a hole in the Polish language, pawian?
OP pawian 159 | 9,553
17 Sep 2011  #111
=Wroclaw]Polish sign language comes directly from German sign language. not that it helps me as i have limited use of ASL.

Very interesting.

=Seanus]So you feel that those words somehow filled a hole in the Polish language, pawian?

Sean, it doesn`t matter what I feel or not. What matters is that each language is a living creature which thinks and acts on its own. If Polish deemed it necessary to adopt German words, it must have felt right to do so.
sascha 1 | 826
17 Sep 2011  #112
What matters is that each language is a living creature which thinks and acts on its own

that means by ur logic that each language 'by its own' integrates english words in its fund? thats bs.

If Polish deemed it necessary to adopt German words, it must have felt right to do so.

language simply refelects the situation in the society. anglo culture is now dominant and so is english language thats why we have that crap in our vocabulary.
OP pawian 159 | 9,553
17 Sep 2011  #113
=sascha]that means by ur logic that each language 'by its own' integrates english words in its fund?

Exactly.

Or maybe you know of a secret English Language Worldwide Adoption Comittee that orchestrates the transfer of anglicisms into world languages?
:):):):)

=sascha]thats bs.

Let me remain sceptical about your views. :):):):)
sascha 1 | 826
18 Sep 2011  #114
hahahha. ur even more funny than i thought. :)

the language reflects the political power. thats it. if polish has many german words, that very well just reflect who dominated then. nothing else. same bs with english now, what i honestly very much regret. almost every language has its own words for theirs.

Let me remain sceptical about your views. :):):):)

gerne.
OP pawian 159 | 9,553
18 Sep 2011  #115
hahahha. ur even more funny than i thought. :)

Thank you, You also aren`t as stiff as I previously thought.

the language reflects the political power. thats it. if polish has many german words, that very well just reflect who dominated then. nothing else. same bs with english now, what i honestly very much regret. almost every language has its own words for theirs.

Exactly. That`s what I meant when I said that a language is a living creature and it does what it wants or deems neccessary. Polish borrowed heavily from German in the Middle Ages because German law dominated Poland at the time.

gerne.

Are you German?
:):):)

Did you know that in 1241 Polish, Czech and German knights fought together against Mongols? The first case of Polish German brotherhood in arms:

The Battle of Legnica (Polish: Bitwa pod Legnicą), also known as the Battle of Liegnitz (German: Schlacht von Liegnitz) or Battle of Wahlstatt (German: Schlacht bei Wahlstatt), was a battle between the Mongol Empire and the combined defending forces of European fighters that took place at Legnickie Pole (Wahlstatt) near the city of Legnica (German: Liegnitz) in Silesia on 9 April 1241.

A combined force of Poles, Czechs and Germans under the command of the Polish duke Henry II the Pious of Silesia, supported by feudal nobility and a few knights from military orders sent by the Pope, attempted to halt the Mongol invasion of Europe. The battle came two days before the Mongol victory over the Hungarians at the much larger Battle of Mohi.


en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Legnica
sascha 1 | 826
18 Sep 2011  #116
Are you German?

yes. 100%

Polish borrowed heavily from German in the Middle Ages because German law dominated Poland at the time.

nicely formulated. ;) maybe germanics 'ordered' to use their language to leave even more traces.... :)
OP pawian 159 | 9,553
18 Sep 2011  #117
=pawian]Did you know that in 1241 Polish, Czech and German knights fought together against Mongols? The first case of Polish German brotherhood in arms:

Unfortunately, we, Europeans, lost against Asian hordes.

The Polish commander of European forces, duke Henry the Pious, was beheaded.

Today`s re-enactments focus on infantry instead of on horse-riders.

s
beckski 12 | 1,617
18 Sep 2011  #118
yes. 100%

I tend to think of Sascha usually as a Russian name.
OP pawian 159 | 9,553
18 Sep 2011  #119
I also thought so. But it is a stereotype that 50% Russian males are called Sasha.
Also, it is a stereotype that Germans and Russians get along very well with one another when it comes to Poland. :):):):)
sascha 1 | 826
18 Sep 2011  #120
I tend to think of Sascha usually as a Russian name.

here some info about my name. ;)

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sascha

i am still 100% german and in my generation in gymnasium the only one with that 'strange' name. ;)

Germans and Russians get along very well with one another

they do. they have fear and respect for oneanother. :)


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