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Polish sayings


krysia 23 | 3,057
22 Nov 2006 #31
I think he made that one up.
Babylon 16 | 192
27 Nov 2006 #32
found another polish saying love this 1. were the devil cant go he sends a woman lol thats so true

GDZIE DIABE£ NIE MOŻE TAM BABE POŚLE (in Polish)

so he sent Renata Beger to one room in sejm and she recordered the "type"

-Trzasnąłeś jak łysy grzywką o kant kuli.
-Zabłysłeś jak kropla moczu na desce klozeteowej.
-Trzasnąłeś jak łysy jajami o beton.
-Śmiejesz się jakby koń na blachę szczał.
-Gość w dom, Bóg w dom- żona w ciąży

they are not "sayings" but powiedzionka
dziadek 3 | 64
4 Dec 2006 #33
"powiedzinko", "przysłowie" or in English "saying" are quite the same

most of what i written above are just a funny insults like

You shine like a pitchfork in manure

err... i'll correct myself.
It should be "powiedzonko".
dmip
22 Dec 2006 #34
how do you say 'cheers' (when toasting someone with a drink in Polish.
Nazdadrowia? I need spelling and correct way to pronounce.
Stupidwelsh
22 Dec 2006 #35
I might get shot down here, I’m not a Polish speaker, but it’s Nazdrovia phonetically, and you kind of roll the ‘r’
dziadek 3 | 64
22 Dec 2006 #36
It's "na zdrowie"
also used as post-sneeze "bless you"
Eurola 4 | 1,906
23 Dec 2006 #37
Wiedza sasiedzi jak kto siedzi - Your neighbors know you (really)

Nie widziala dupa slonca i zgorzala od goraca - like, arse who never saw the sun and got burned (usually said to people amused - seeing something for the first time)
Amathyst 19 | 2,702
23 Dec 2006 #38
a rolling stone gathers no moss

a bird in the bush is worth 12 in the hand
Tom_Poland 1 | 17
23 Dec 2006 #39
The best one - "Kto pije i pali ten nie ma robali" so in English it goes in this way "The one who both smokes and drinks doesn't get roundworms" :) Cheers!
Stupidwelsh
23 Dec 2006 #40
a rolling stone gathers no moss

a bird in the bush is worth 12 in the hand

Are they Polish sayings?
Eurola 4 | 1,906
23 Dec 2006 #41
Na Boze Narodzenie przybywa dnia na kurze stapienie, a na Nowy Rok na barani skok - At X-mas we gain light at the size of chicken's step, at New Year the size of ram's jump.

Boze Narodzenie po wodzie, Wielkanoc po lodzie - Rainy X-mas, frosty Easter.
(can be reversed, it's a way of forecasting the spring)

Are they Polish sayings?

Yes, I heard them all :)

Modli sie pod figura a diabla ma za skora - he(she) prays but has a devil under the skin.

Pan Bogu swieczke, a diablu ogarek - A candle for God, a stump for the devil (said about two faced people)

Jakby suka nie dala to by pies nie wzial - if the ***** did not put out the dog would not hump her.
shabone
4 Jan 2007 #42
I would like to paint a saying in my kitchen i belive it is similar to ...Bsume Dupa ?? Meaning Kiss My Ass - Can Anyone help me?
Eurola 4 | 1,906
4 Jan 2007 #43
You're funny, :) you don't really want the words on the wall!

But, in case you do "pocaluj mnie w dupe"
BialaPolska 1 | 116
5 Jan 2007 #44
When i was a kid and i told my mom i was bored or had nothing to do she would say "rozbiersz sie i bron ubranie" Which means take off your clothes and guard them.
krysia 23 | 3,057
5 Jan 2007 #45
"pocaluj mnie w dupe"

If you want the Polish letters it's:
"pocałuj mnie w dupę"
Brownie
7 Jan 2007 #46
My great aunt is looking for the Polish characters for a phrase -- "Zeby cie kaczka kopla."

And I'm wondering what people have heard as the origins and usage of this phrase. More than ten years ago, a Slavic Languages prof said she believed it was an insult -- like, you're so low only a waddling duck *could* kick you. My aunt originally heard it was a wish of good luck, but that didn't make seem to make sense. She asked me, because I was dabbling in Polish at the time ... I've seen it a few places, but never with Polish characters.

Thanks!
krysia 23 | 3,057
7 Jan 2007 #47
"Żeby Cię kaczka kopła"
The proper Polish word for "kopła" is "kopnęła"
I think it's an insult.
Brownie
7 Jan 2007 #48
Thanks, Krysia!

Am I remembering right? Does it translate to roughly "May a duck kick you?" I haven't found my old Polish texts and dictionary yet -- too many books!
krysia 23 | 3,057
7 Jan 2007 #49
It really means: "Get kicked by a duck"
dziadek 3 | 64
9 Jan 2007 #50
And it's addresed to someone when he wants to do something risky or stupid and you can't
convince him to throw away that idea. Also can be used when he already did something crazy.
Brownie
9 Jan 2007 #51
Thanks, Dziadek -- but any idea why it's used in this context? I'd love the history on this. Unfortunately, my family is a few generations removed from Poland. My older relatives don't know or remember much of the language, and I'm the only "youngster" interested in digging ...

Krysia, Did you cap the "C" on purpose? Another bit of grammar I don't remember from college, perhaps?

Thanks again.
krysia 23 | 3,057
9 Jan 2007 #52
when you write a letter to someone you like in Polish you usually capitalize words pertaining to that person: You, Your's, Twoja, Ciebie.
It does not need to be capitalized in this sentence.
Sunsi
18 Jan 2007 #53
"Szczescie jest pomiedzy ustami i brzegiem kielicha"
"happiness is between the lips and the rim of a glass"

:)
dobermankid
21 Jan 2007 #54
This is how my grandma used to say it:

Lepszy wróbel w garści niż gołąb na dachu.
(A sparrow in your hand is better than a pigeon on the roof).

I guess there are many different ways it could be said.
Kamyk 2 | 61
22 Jan 2007 #55
"Skonczyla sie poloweczka, ale na szczescie jest jeszcze czwiarteczka"

a to opisuje realia dzisiejszych wielu slubow:
"Dzisiaj wesele i dziś zmówiny, a za poł roku chrzciny"
miranda
22 Jan 2007 #56
nie przesadzaj, bo Ci doniczek zabraknie:)
miranda
23 Jan 2007 #57
that was a Polish saying I heard a long time ago - I wasn't referring to your comment Kamyk:)
Kamyk 2 | 61
24 Jan 2007 #58
ok miranda .. this one took me a while to figure out, my bet :) ... that was a good one by the way! not sure how to translate it so it still makes the Polish sense though :(
miranda
24 Jan 2007 #59
unfortunately it cannot be done
polishcanuck 7 | 462
11 Feb 2007 #60
Co wolno wojewodzie to nie tobie smordzie!

My dad always says this, its hard to translate though. Maybe someone can help.

Basically when someone does something (ie: eat dinner on the couch) and then you try doing the same, the person will tell you this. Maybe translates to something like this: What i can do you can't. Or just because i can do it doesnt mean u can. Bah i dunno.


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