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Posts by landora  

Joined: 14 Oct 2009 / Female ♀
Last Post: 19 Jan 2016
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Posts: Total: 199 / Live: 193 / Archived: 6

Displayed posts: 193 / page 1 of 7
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landora   
19 Jan 2016
Polonia / Polonia outraged by EU interference [196]

In many countries you lose your right to vote if you don't live in the said country. These are democratic countries as well. It's absolutely immoral to live abroad and vote without bearing any consequences. This especially applies to American Polonia - those people very often have never been in Poland, don't even speak the language and yet, they seem to think they are "patriots". Makes me so mad.
landora   
19 Jan 2016
Polonia / Polonia outraged by EU interference [196]

I sincerely urge Polonia to bugger off from the affairs that don't concern them.
Dear Polonia! If you feel our new government is so great, you're welcome to come back and pay taxes in Poland, and THAN you can vote/protest/have an opinion. Before that, please kindly shut up.
landora   
27 Nov 2015
Life / Moving to Poland and not drinking vodka [26]

I must say that I witnessed much more heavy drinking among the Brits in the UK, then in Poland.
Many of my friends rarely drink, or only drink beer.
So really, stop panicking.
landora   
7 Nov 2015
Language / "Pan" or "Ty" - how people address each other in Poland? [55]

Poles are very formal and love to use titles "Pani Magister" to the pharmacist, for instance, which cracks me up

In all my 33 years of life in Poland I've never heard anyone doing this. I think it's a very outdated habit, maybe still present in some villages, but definitely not in the cities. After all, who doesn't have "magister" title right now?
landora   
4 Nov 2015
History / POLAND: EASTERN or CENTRAL European country? [1071]

nope, check where the centre of Europe is on the map. I will help you: according to current measurements, it's "located in Lithuania, specifically 26 kilometres (16 mi) north of its capital city, Vilnius, near the village of Purnuškės." And Poland is West of Lithuania...
landora   
14 Oct 2015
Travel / I'm so bored in Poland! [129]

Dougpol, it's not like British (or American) small towns have so many attractions and places to go. Compare like for like...
landora   
14 Oct 2015
Food / Supermarket or small corner shop for grocery shopping in Poland? [23]

Why would you say that UHT milk is unhealthy? It has slightly less nutrients, that's true (slightly less vitamins B, C and folic acid), and no bacteria, but it's not unhealthy.

In Poznań and in Wrocław there is plenty of "mlekomaty" to be found and they don't disappear.
mlekomaty.org/swieze-mleko/2.190.lista-mlekomatow

They seem to be more popular in Czech Republic.
landora   
10 Oct 2015
Life / Surgery for a cat in hospital in Poland? [12]

I hope no vet agrees to such an "operation". Cats scratch, that's normal - either learn t olive with this, or give your cat to someone who actually likes animals. As far as I can see, it's illegal in Poland.
landora   
14 Sep 2015
News / Should Poland exit the EU immediately? [375]

No, Ironside, the fact that someone votes for PO doesn't mean they are "post-commies" or "post-Poles" (what does it even mean??).

You might not have noticed, but PiS has much more socialist economic views than PO. PiS is a right wing party only by name, and maybe by their social views (abortion etc.). In any other countries parties that want to give people handouts are left parties!

So anyway, no, we wouldn't be better off outside of EU. We'd be outcasts. And yes, we do need EU money. And I don't know how about you, but I enjoy being able to travel and work wherever I want within EU. As do many other Poles. Leaving EU would be the most idiotic move ever.
landora   
11 Sep 2015
News / Poles v Tusk's school 'reform' [58]

G, have you ever studied at the Polish university? I have, at two of them, and than I went to study in the UK. The Polish university, unfortunately, can't even start to compete with the British one. And I studied at one of the best unis in Poland, and the uni in the UK was no Oxford. I'm sorry to say this, but our unis suck.
landora   
10 Sep 2015
News / Poles v Tusk's school 'reform' [58]

We are talking about Poland, not about US. In Poland, the system without gimnasiums was slowly introduced AFTER 1945, by communists. Yes, at the beginning there were 7 classes of primary school, finally, in 1961, whole Poland was switched to 8 + 4 system. Before the II WW there were gymnasiums with so called "small matura", than high school and normal matura. It's not propaganda, it's facts. My grandparents went to school in this system.

So, right now people are terrified of having their "tiny" first graders together with the kids from 6th grade, and PiS wants to put much older teenagers back into primary schools? I must congratulate them on their logical thinking...
landora   
10 Sep 2015
News / Poles v Tusk's school 'reform' [58]

Traditional school system in Poland is not 8+4. The primary school lasting for 8 years it was introduced in 1961 by the Communist Party. So basically PiS is supporting communist solutions :D

Between the wars we had system consisting of primary school, gimnasium and high school, similar to the current system.

Many people failed their "matura" because of the fact that everyone now goes to high school. It's very good they failed - not everyone should have matura, not everyone should study.
landora   
3 Dec 2013
Study / Looking for 'reviews' of schools for expat kids in Poland [28]

As you will have seen from the web pages, the co-located Gimnazjum (nr 24) runs a MYP program and both schools provide general "bi-lingual" teaching possibilities.

The kids are 5 and 8, they are hardly going to go to gimnazjum, let alone to liceum.
She needs a primary school.

Really, 5 and 8 year old will pick up the language quickly, a good Polish school should be fine.
landora   
2 Sep 2013
Travel / Poles the worst-dressed tourists in the world? [22]

Exactly, I was showing a group of elderly Swedish people round Poznań and all the men were wearing socks and sandals. It's not just a Polish thing.
landora   
1 Sep 2013
Life / Why is cheating at schools in Poland accepted?! [155]

Where did I say I or my parents studied law?
Nowhere, because we didn't - we all studied a branch of science at UAM. Majority of exams were written.
No, my parents were not teenagers when they had me, but what does it matter anyway?

You know exactly that it's true, cheating is ingrained in our culture. I know that because I'm Polish, I went to school here m I studied here. Why are you pretending otherwise?

Have a look at the posts from WPiA UAM forum:

forum-prawo.pl/viewtopic.php?t=4553&start=45
forum-prawo.pl/viewtopic.php?f=56&t=4396&start=40
forum-prawo.pl/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=1147

I wonder why those students are discussing cheating if NO ONE cheats in Poland. :D And if these are the students from one of the best unis in the country, then I don't want to know how the ones from worse schools behave...
landora   
1 Sep 2013
Life / Why is cheating at schools in Poland accepted?! [155]

Oh Monia, how you made me laugh! I'm sorry to disappoint you, but I know exactly what I'm talking about.
I'm Polish, I studied at two different Polish universities, both public, both full time, including UAM, which is much much better than your UMCS (UMCS came 31st according to Rzeczpospolita ranking).

You had only oral exams? You must be really old, when I studied ( I started in 2001), most exams were already written. Even when my parents studied many exams were written! And yes, people were cheating; it's not seen as something wrong by most people in Poland.

No one would cheat where I studied in the UK... But in Poland I'm not surprised, as half of the subjects were not connected to the course, taught by people whose knowledge and mentality was stuck somewhere in the 70s.

So, dear Monia, I'm an educated woman too. But, unlike you, I have experienced both education systems and I can compare them.
landora   
31 Aug 2013
Study / MBA in Poland for 40+ and older? [62]

Through your statement I just made quick assumption like everybody else here about low requirements to get into courses of law and administration . After that when you hooked people on your twisted rod you revealed that it was not law but european studies .

Everyone knows that you can study different courses in one faculty - Law, Administration, European Studies and whatever else... It was like this for years, when did you study that you don't know this??

In your first post you claimed that it's difficult to get into tuition free courses in Poland. He proved you wrong, that's why you're so angry? I know people from my primary who were barely getting a pass, who went to the worst high school in the city - and who graduated from the university with MA degree. Of course, it wasn't law or medicine that they studied, but nevertheless, they wouldn't have gotten into any uni in the UK. That's just ridiculous.

I studied in Poland (on two different universities) and in the UK. I'm sorry, but there's just no comparison - the course in Poland was old-fashioned, many subjects were completely irrelevant to the chosen degree, the course was utter ********. The British uni was really teaching what it should be teaching. There was no cheating, the teachers were interested in their students and the exams were fair and relevant to the subject. Polish course was heavy on theory, that's true - but I learnt within 1 year in the UK more than in 3 years in Poland. Sorry to burst your bubble...

If I could choose again I would never, ever choose a Polish university.
landora   
24 Aug 2013
UK, Ireland / Advice on child support (Irish with my Polish husband) [106]

If you want child support, let there be a child for the father to support. She doesn't even want the kid to call his father "dad" for chrissakes.

You don't know if it's true, that's merely what the OP is claiming. I would be upset if my father left us and started a new family - and I probably would not want to stay in touch much. And I'm 31, not 8. My cousin calls her mother "pani", she's so upset about her leaving. My cousin was 7 when her mother left, now she's 20 - she still hasn't forgiven her.

If father wanted the contact so much, he would have fought for it, instead he just cut the payment. If you really want to see your child, you don't move to another country, you stay close so that you can see your kid - if it's more important to you than a new relationship. You go to the court and fight, if the mother is denying access. Cutting the money doesn't achieve anything and is completely illogical.

No, he was angry at the mother for doing everything to make his own child hate him.

Very much depends on a village. Some villages are really poor. Others are only villages by name, in reality most of the people there work in the cities. It depends in which part of Poland it is.

I doubt if she had to make the child hate him, he left the mother and the kid and started a new family, of course the child is upset, who wouldn't be?? The OP said they cut the money because this abandoned 8 year old was cold towards his father. My God...
landora   
24 Aug 2013
UK, Ireland / Advice on child support (Irish with my Polish husband) [106]

And presumably spend any money he might have on the move, right? That's a very smart suggestion. :-/
In the current economic climate the most one can do is try to keep the job they do have. Also, if he pays 350 PLN the ex-wife should pay the same, I think spending 700 PLN a month in total on a child under 10 is more than enough.

It doesn't work like that.
If they shared childcare 50-50, than yes, they should be spending an equal amount of money each. But here, because the ex wife is putting in hours actually spent on bringing up the child, he has to pay more money than her. I think anything less than 500zł a month is ridiculous.

Also, from what I can see, the ex wife was not "money crazy", as the OP put it, before they lowered the payment to 150zł per month, which is just insulting. Also, it's illegal, you can't just decide that from now on you're paying less without the court order.

The fact she lives with her parents is neither here nor there, none of the OP's business. Life in a village is not that much cheaper than in the city - you don't have Tesco there with own brands, village shops may be quite expensive. And the fact that the OP doesn't take her kids to the zoo, cinema or swiming pool is her own problem. As far as I'm concerned, if you can't afford children, you shouldn't have them.
landora   
29 Jun 2013
Life / Wedding venues in Lodz or Zgierz?? [15]

How are you planning to sort all this out, if you don't speak Polish? Some places will speak English, of course, but not everyone, and certainly not in the offices (also, the priest is more likely to speak Latin than English, we had a massive problem in finding one in one of the biggest Polsih cities).

And the guys are right about the prices, they will give you a higher price just because they think you might pay more.
Plus, your fiance doesn't seem like a very nice guy, forgive me for saying this...
landora   
29 Jun 2013
Law / Getting married in Poland (documentation, church) [42]

Another occasion where our priest insisted on "Catholic witnesses" was during the baptism of our son.

It's a completly different story. The godparents have to be Catholic, because they swear during the ceremony that they will help to bring the child up in the Catholic faith. So they have to be Catholic, go to confession and be confirmed.

The wedding witnesses don't swear anything such, they just have to be 18 or over and sane. They don't have to provide any certificates of baptism or go to confession. I believe you that the preiest demended it, however, he was simply wrong.

My partner did say a lot of poles hire a fire station hall to have the after party?? However we are going to a polish wedding in September that's going to be in a palace

Yes, in villages. Is your partner from a village?

In short...its massively bureaucratic and from what people told me, more work than doing the religious route!

You have to have the paperwork for the registry office if you get married in a church just as well - the office sorts out the "official" part, you take the paper from the office to the church, the priest fills the rest in, you and your witnesses sign it and it's sent back to the registry office. Then you can pick up your certificate from the office - not from the church! Without the paperwork from the office you'd only be married in the eyes of the Church, not legally - for example, you wouldn't be seen as a married couple for the tax purposes. It would have as much legal meaning as saying your vows in front of your friend in the forest. Anyway, the Church only agrees to do that in very rare cases - usually it has to have the legal meaning too.
landora   
27 Jun 2013
Law / Getting married in Poland (documentation, church) [42]

We gave the Certificate to the registry office (USC), not to the priest.
You have to have the documents sorted in the registry office in order to allow the priest to marry you both legally and in the eyes of the Church. After the ceremony he sends the paperwork to the registry office and that's where you pick up your marriage certificate from.
landora   
27 Jun 2013
Law / Getting married in Poland (documentation, church) [42]

We paid after the wedding, the priest didn't even ask.
The witnesses don't have to be Catholic!!! It's a common myth. If your priest says that, ask him where it is stated in the Canon Law.

The interview with the bishop will be about you as a non Catholic and your acceptance and tolerance for the Catholic way of life.

We did not have to have any interviews with a bishop, and my husband is not Catholic (although Christian).
We were supposed to bring the witnesses that he's not married, but we got away with it and finally didn't have to.

The important part is to get the Certificate of No Impediment - my husband got it from the British Embassy, but you can probably obtain it in the UK.
landora   
12 Jun 2013
Love / Asking her family for permission to propose to my Polish girlfriend? [28]

So having a best man or brides maid at a wedding is sexist, should it not be best person or brides friend in your world?

We don't have bridesmaids or bestmen in Poland, just witnesses - and we had two girls.
Also, don't you see a difference between having bridesmaids and having to ask woman's father for a permission to marry her? Come on, i was 28 when we got married, why would I need my daddy's permission??
landora   
12 Jun 2013
Love / Asking her family for permission to propose to my Polish girlfriend? [28]

Don't worry about it, some very traditional families might still do it (although noone I know, and I'm Polish), but this tradition is - to me - incredibly sexist. An adult woman can surely decide herself whether she wants to marry someone or not? Ask her, not her daddy.