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Do you call it kiszka or kaszanka?


Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
29 Oct 2009  #1
For whatever reason, Poland's black pudding (groat, blood & offal sausage) is mainly called kiszka across American Polonia and kaszanka in Poland. Anybody know why?
polkamaniac 1 | 482
29 Oct 2009  #3
kiszka-----I think it's a variation of ukrainian "kishka"
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
29 Oct 2009  #4
Is this possible? In some old 19th-century cookery books I have seen the term 'kiszka kaszana'. Could it have been that the émigrés too the 'kiszka kaszana' to America where it got shortend to just 'kiszka', whilst in the Old Country the second part was rejigged into 'kaszanka'. Just a guess. Sound plausible?
stevew 2 | 29
29 Oct 2009  #5
ohhhh I miss kaszanka :(

And czarny...

(In New Zealand, they do make some 'black pudding' which is an English recipe not unlike czarny, but its made with imported *powdered* blood. Why they can't use fresh local blood is ridiculous).
cheehaw 2 | 263
29 Oct 2009  #6
kiszka -kish-z-ka

dreadful stuff.
regionpolski 33 | 153
30 Oct 2009  #7
I was in Kurowski Sausage Shop in Chicago on Sunday. I asked for kiszka, and got a puzzled look. I then asked for kaszanka, and got my kiszka.
Babchie - | 1
31 Oct 2009  #8
Does anyone know of a butcher shop in Pennsylvania that sells kishka? (I found this website because I was searching for one!) I live in south-central PA.
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
1 Nov 2009  #9
Maybe one of these places offer kiszka/kaszanka to your liking:

Alfred's Deli Plus
3041 Brereton St., Pittsburgh PA 15219 USA

Anna Polish Deli
611 Scotrun Ave, # 611, Scotrun PA 18355 USA

Czerw's Polish Food
3370 Tilton St., Philadelphia PA 19134 USA

Elzbieta Polish Deli
215 Main Ave., Hawlay PA 18428 USA

Hank's Produce
2300 East Clearfield St., Philadelphia PA 19134 USA

Krakus Market
3150 Richmont Street, Philadelphia PA 19134 USA

Krystyna's Kitchen and Roman's Polish Food
2910 North 5th Street, Reading PA 19605 USA

Lachowicz Polish Market
4500 E. Thompson St., Philadelphia PA 19137 USA

Marian Bakery
2615 E. Allegheny Ave., Philadelphia PA 19134 USA

Mazury Deli
22 Sterling Rd., Droga 196, Mount Pocono PA 18344 USA

Orzeł Deli
207 N. 9th St., Stroudsburg PA 18360 USA

Piast Deli
2421 E. Allegheny Ave., Philadelphia PA 19134 USA

Piast International Delicatessen
2712 E. Allegheny Ave., Philadelphia PA 19134 USA

Piast International Delicatessen
2421 E. Allegheny Ave., Philadelphia PA 19134 USA

Pierogies Plus Inc.
342 Island Ave., McKees Rocks PA 15136 USA

Pocono Polka Deli
RR 3 Box 3266, East Stroudsburg PA 18301 USA

Polish Gourmet - European Market
1250 Bethlehem Pike, Hatfield PA 19440 USA

Polka Deli
2719 E. Allegheny Ave., Philadelphia PA 19134 USA

Robert Lachowicz Quality Foods
2582 Orthodox St., Philadelphia PA 19137 USA

S&D Polish Deli
2204 Penn Ave., Pittsburgh PA 15222 USA

Shop Rite Supermarket
3745 Aramingo Ave., Philadelphia PA 19134 USA

Smakosz Polish Deli
2653 Orthodox St., Philadelphia PA 19137 USA

Super Delikatesy
2625 E. Allegheny, Philadelphia PA 19134 USA

Szypula Bakery
3050 Richmond St., Philadelphia PA 19134 USA
yehudi 1 | 432
10 Nov 2009  #10
Just for general knowledge: Jews think kishka is a Jewish food. (I had no idea that Poles eat it.) But Jewish kishka is different because we don't eat blood. Our kishka is intestine (or a manmade substitute) stuffed with chopped meat, potato and fat. It's usually cooked together with Tsholent, which is a stew made of potatoes, chunks of meat, beans, barley, beef bones, and when we're lucky... kishka.
McCoy 27 | 1,276
10 Nov 2009  #11
Jews think kishka is a Jewish food

kiszka in polish means a bowel
mosiniak - | 4
11 Nov 2009  #12
Kaszanka is a more "modern" word, kiszka is still used in Eastern Poland and among older persons. In Silesia it's called krupniok.
Piorun - | 658
11 Nov 2009  #13
kiszka is still used in Eastern Poland

Perhaps you meant Western Poland because all the people from Eastern Poland were resettled there after the WWII or are we forgetting where we came from already? What are you trying to say? only people from western Poland are modern. Mosiek z kresów hence the nick, I suppose.

BTW you forgot to mention “żymlok”.
mosiniak - | 4
12 Nov 2009  #14
I meant my family coming and/or living in Eastern Poland use the word "kiszka", while all the people in Northwest Poland I know use "kaszanka". Both those who lived there before the WW2 and those who were forced to leave their houses by communists. As far as I know "kaszanka" is used more commonly, that's why I assumed it is more "modern". Of course I may be wrong.

Żymłok is made of bread rolls instead of kasza.
Leszczynski
24 Nov 2009  #15
Seems like you guys really need some tutoring in Polish cuisine...
and as a 1st gen Pollack (that's right...I said it!), from Silesia
I have to dispute over krupniok(krupnik-as it was called by non Silesian families*)
being same as kiszka(or kaszanka)
It's a great mistake to call the two the same dish
for the reason krupniok is a soup!

*Silesians have very strong accent that is very distinct among Polish speakers.
It is a Polish dialect called 'gwara Slaska'....and it's pretty intimidating if not familiar with.
Olaf 6 | 956
2 Mar 2010  #16
Kiszka or rather kicha in Poznań lingo means almost all sort of smoked sausages etc. (kiełbasa)
skysoulmate 14 | 1,297
2 Mar 2010  #17
...But Jewish kishka is different because we don't eat blood...

So does "kosher" mean "no blood" or does it have to do with how the food is made? Friend of mine (non-Jewish) always tries to buy kosher food (not easy to find where we live) because she says it's healthier - is it?
jwojcie 2 | 763
2 Mar 2010  #18
in central Poland definitely kaszanka, as for kiszka, wiki says that it is used mainly in Cracow region...
mafketis 20 | 7,243
2 Mar 2010  #19
If I remember right (no guarantee that I do) in Wrocław, kiszka refers to a kind of kebab. I seem to remember a ton of kiszka stands in and around the train station.
polkamaniac 1 | 482
3 Mar 2010  #20
hERE IS WHAT I FOUND OUT ON THIS SUBJECT-----
"Polish blood sausage is called kiszka. (More accurately, it's called kaszanka, which is a type of kiszka, or sausage. But in the US, kiszka seems to have become an accepted nickname for kaszanka.)



Olaf 6 | 956
3 Mar 2010  #21
Yes, but bear in mind that when a guy from Poznań says kicha he means usually any sausage. It depends though...
polkamaniac 1 | 482
6 Mar 2010  #22
I guess it depends if he says kicha or kiszka
Eurola 4 | 1,906
6 Mar 2010  #23
kicha

on/ona kicha - he sneezes

krupniok - kaszanka made with kasza perlowa (pearl barley) - delicious. Mostly delicacy of southern Poland. It tastes great grilled. You should try it people.
polkamaniac 1 | 482
7 Mar 2010  #24
This is interesting---you can try " the Jewish version of kiszka which is made by stuffing a beef intestine with matzo meal and szmalec as well as spices (sounds yummy, can't wait to eat it! Not! Just kidding, it's really good in my opinion). Paprika is one of the spices used, and depending on the amount of paprika used, the color of kishka can range from grey-white to brownish-orange".



WOLNYDUCHOWO - | 2
2 Dec 2010  #25
When I lived in Poland we called it : KASZANKA
In my part of Poland( South) we called plain kefir a " kiszka"
Olaf 6 | 956
2 Dec 2010  #26
I guess it depends if he says kicha or kiszka

Not really, no.
smurf 39 | 1,981
2 Dec 2010  #27
Ino krupniok synki i dziolchi!

Yep, nobody calls it kaszanka or kiszka in Gorny Sląsk...they're gorole names for it :)
Teffle 22 | 1,321
2 Dec 2010  #28
You should try it people.

It's great!

I wonder how many Pol-Ams actually like kaszanka/kiszka?

Not many I'm guessing - I think blood sausage generally is almost unknown in the US.
delphiandomine 83 | 17,648
2 Dec 2010  #29
For whatever reason, Poland's black pudding (groat, blood & offal sausage) is mainly called kiszka across American Polonia and kaszanka in Poland. Anybody know why?

Because the American Polonia use words dating from the time when Pollock Johnny was a mere twinkle in his mother's eye.

Or they simply don't know Polish.


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