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Kaszanka and haggis?



Polonius3 1,019 | 12,923    
8 Jul 2011  #1

How, in your view, does haggis compare with kaszanka? In objective terms (cost, ingredients, preparation) and subjectively (appetising appearance, aroma, flavourfulness)? Do either or both rank amongst your favourites? How and when (which meal) do you eat them?


isthatu2 4 | 2,712    
8 Jul 2011  #2

Haggis,sorry,Im a stereotype,at least once or twice a fortnight :):)
JonnyM 12 | 2,634    
8 Jul 2011  #3

cost, ingredients, preparation

Kaszanka is cheaper and contains fewer ingredients. People tend to buy haggis rather than make it. Kaszanka the same - it's cheap to buy and shop bought is no different to home made.

appetising appearance, aroma, flavourfulness

Both look good, but haggis has the offal and spices which make it a richer food. Black Pudding is much closer to kaszanka. There is a sausage-shaped haggis, but this tends to be sold in fish and chip shops in some parts of Scotland. I sometimes serve haggis for dinner - Polish guests usually love it.
Seanus 15 | 19,750    
8 Jul 2011  #4

Haggis, for me, is a world apart from kaszanka which is gross black pudding. I had haggis quite often as a kid so it was sth of a tradition to eat it with turnips and tatties. Kaszanka is a food for those who wish for an early grave.
dtaylor5632 18 | 2,015    
8 Jul 2011  #5

Kaszanka is a food for those who wish for an early grave.

Kaszanka is all right, hit or miss for me. You need to cover the lot with a tonne of pepper to get any true favour. With Haggis you know you are getting something yummy. Must be stated that Haggis(lamb or mutton) and Kaszanka(pig) are 2 totally different things, closest you will get to kaszanka is black pudding but with big differences in flavour.
Seanus 15 | 19,750    
8 Jul 2011  #6

Haggis is a food to be served as a meal, IMHO. It's not a stand-alone food and most definitely isn't a snack. The Burns Night dinner is lovely :)
dtaylor5632 18 | 2,015    
8 Jul 2011  #7

Haggis and cheddar cheese sandwich! I love it!
Seanus 15 | 19,750    
8 Jul 2011  #8

An interesting combo but I'm traditional when it comes to haggis :)
dtaylor5632 18 | 2,015    
8 Jul 2011  #9

Can also pick up a braveheart pizza from the local chip shop, lovely and a deep fried haggis mars bar is a must!
Seanus 15 | 19,750    
8 Jul 2011  #10

A braveheart pizza? Oh, Arbroath was the first to start that nonsense. It quickly spread to Montrose and then all around Scotland. I guess some Poles there have tried it and taken 10 years off of their lives.
dtaylor5632 18 | 2,015    
8 Jul 2011  #11

Arbroath was the first to start that nonsense.

Not that you needed to give me any excuses never to visit that junkie filled hell hole :D

I guess some Poles there have tried it and taken 10 years off of their lives.

It's quite interesting looking at some of the Polish lassies I know who come here skinny as a rake then suddenly get addicted to the chippy crap... doesn't take em long to plump up :D
Seanus 15 | 19,750    
8 Jul 2011  #12

Any coastal area is like that. They get the munchies and pig out on that garbage passed off as food.

Plumpish, maybe. Many Polish girls like their meat (no pun intended) but still seem to keep their weight down. Scotland is the capital of coronary heart disease in the world so good luck to them.
JonnyM 12 | 2,634    
8 Jul 2011  #13

Any coastal area is like that. They get the munchies and pig out on that garbage passed off as food.

Bloody hell, you've just defined Scarborough Woof. Whitby Woof is much the same.
Seanus 15 | 19,750    
8 Jul 2011  #14

I don't think haggis would be so popular there.
hythorn 3 | 581    
25 Jan 2012  #15

here is a recipe for vegetarian haggis which I found on The Guardian

guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/wordofmouth/2012/jan/25/burns-night-supper-vegetarian-haggis

it looks half decent but more importantly it incorporates ingredients which are readily available in Poland

I am going to give it a bash and will let you know how I get on
pawian 127 | 6,581    
25 Jan 2012  #16

here is a recipe for vegetarian haggis which I found on The Guardian

Reminds me of artificial caviar made of seaweed. I never tried it but suppose it tastes like shyte.
hythorn 3 | 581    
25 Jan 2012  #17

I never tried it but suppose it tastes like shyte.

you have left yourself wide open to a stinging retort

luckily I am feeling magnaminous
Trevek 27 | 1,703    
25 Jan 2012  #18

I think chip-shop haggis is nearer to kaszanka, but the better haggis is a lot different.

happy Burns Night, chaps!
ShAlEyNsTfOh 4 | 162    
26 Jan 2012  #19

I eat both regularly here... both are money WELL SPENT! :)
murdowski    
19 Oct 2016  #20

Can I buy haggis anywhere in Poland?

murdowski@gmail.com
Wulkan - | 3,201    
19 Oct 2016  #21

haggis

Definitely not like those you can have in Glasgow.
Chris Th - | 1    
26 May 2017  #22

You can buy tinned haggis in Poland I think. Not the same admittedly but can be nice to make haggis-stuffed mushrooms with a bit of parmesan on top



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