The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered  |  Archives 
 
 
User: Guest

Home / Food  % width posts: 55

Do you call it kiszka or kaszanka?


hudsonspt - | 1
10 Mar 2011 #31
I had kiszka today

I had kiszka today. What is the one I think with rice starts with a H ???????
enkidu 7 | 623
10 Mar 2011 #32
Just for general knowledge: Jews think kishka is a Jewish food. (I had no idea that Poles eat it.)

That. This sounds delicious.

BTW - I know why the American Polonia call the "kaszanka" as "kiszka". But I think that nobody would like the answer.
pawian 176 | 13,997
23 Apr 2011 #33
I say kaszanka for thinner ones and kiszka for thicker.
Havok 10 | 912
23 Apr 2011 #34
it's called krupniok
alexw68
23 Apr 2011 #35
That's a soup, isn't it, mate?
Seanus 15 | 19,706
23 Apr 2011 #36
Krupniok is Silesian largely. It's basically the same as the thread foods :)
PennBoy 76 | 2,437
23 Apr 2011 #37
Do you call it kiszka or kaszanka?

kaszanka people who came from Poland call it that, I heard Polish Americans call in Kiszka sometimes.
Havok 10 | 912
23 Apr 2011 #38
That's a soup, isn't it, mate?

call me shipmate next time.

it's krupniok, good stuff, blood sausage... We all know that the British have a penchant for the disgusting and bizarre foods as well. In GB it's called the puddings. Stop being ignorant mate.
alexw68
23 Apr 2011 #39
We all know that the British have a penchant for the disgusting and bizarre foods as well.

I, Sir, call what you are referring to 'Marmite'.
JonnyM 11 | 2,620
24 Apr 2011 #40
'Marmite'.

I feel seasick already. Despite just having had tongue with artichokes for lunch.
tygrys 3 | 295
24 Apr 2011 #41
Do you call it kiszka or kaszanka?

I call it "duży chuj"
JonnyM 11 | 2,620
24 Apr 2011 #42
Sooner or later, that's the same thing, innit?

That's what they all say. That and "my wife doesn't understand me".

The head chef here seems to be Polish, and I noticed surówka had crept onto the menu yesterday. Maybe kiszka next.
Kowalskigirl
27 Apr 2011 #43
I love it and many others do too. We call it kiszka. My parents were first generation polamer's. In New England a brand called "Rosols" is very good.
landora - | 199
27 Apr 2011 #44
Definitely "kaszanka". My family from Lublin area called it "kaszanka" as well. "Kiszka" must be Kresy version? Never heard of it!

Polonia use it because most of them came from what is now Ukraine...
Kolega Lublin
12 Aug 2018 #45
The oldest recorded recipes for kiszki [Polish plural form for kiszka, meaning intestine] come from the cookbooks of noblemens' chefs. In the 17th century, the term kiszka was used to designate both animal intestines (used as a casing for sausages) and the actual sausage-like product.
Josepha
29 Oct 2018 #46
In the 1960s and 1970s the kiszka could be cut and friend in a skillet and hold it's form within it's ring of skin. Now there seems to just fall apart and turn into mush. Likely the recipe used has more fillers and less good stuff. Also the casing was much heavier in the 60s & 70s, less barley.
Lyzko 29 | 7,108
29 Oct 2018 #47
Sounds to me regrettably like low-fat "healthy" cooking has invaded the Polish kitchen as well:-)

Give me a good ol' Polish greasy spoon with lots of fatty dishes, kiszka prepared the traditional way, heaping portions of bigos, pirogi, red cabbage, potatoes, home-baked country bread ANY DAY OF THE WEEK!!! Can't get enough of it, even if someday I'll need a cardiac surgeon.

lol
mafketis 24 | 8,889
30 Oct 2018 #48
My family from Lublin area called it "kaszanka" as well. "Kiszka" must be Kresy version?

In modern standard Polish blood sausage is 'kaszanka' (krupniok in Silesia)

kiszka refers more to instestines filled with potatoes (and other stuff)

pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kiszka_ziemniaczana
Atch 16 | 3,204
30 Oct 2018 #49
That's spot on Maf. Kaszanka is the dark brown stuff made with cereal and blood, a bit like the English black pudding. The only time I've ever heard the term kiszka is for kiszka ziemniaczana which Mr Atch calls 'potato sausage' in English. It's actually quite hard to get now in the small Warsaw shops though I've seen it in Biedronka. It seems to be less popular than kaszanka. It sometimes has tiny bits of boczek chopped up and added to the mixture.
mafketis 24 | 8,889
30 Oct 2018 #50
It's actually quite hard to get now in the small Warsaw shops

It's never been a thing in western Poland where I am... so Biedronka was the first place I ever saw it on sale. Is kaszanka in Warsaw more with barley or buckwheat?

My favorite kaszanka though was in Hungary where they do two types, blood (veres hurka) and liver (majas hurka) the liver kaszanka is very yummy and the blood version has a hint of chilli and is almost but not quite sweet.

Stores here now have kaszanka with liver (combined with blood) but not just the liver..... : (
Lyzko 29 | 7,108
30 Oct 2018 #51
I'm there, maf, just serve it up and I'll come a-runnin'.
Miloslaw 8 | 2,425
30 Oct 2018 #52
It's pork mate......and pork blood to boot.....I thought you were Jewish...
Lyzko 29 | 7,108
31 Oct 2018 #53
I'm traif, sue me:-) He-he!

My tevilin-wearing grandfather was a pork-eating German Jew who LOVED bacon and pigs knuckles.
Estofellow
22 Dec 2020 #54
I looked on this site to become educated, but now I am more confused than ever. My local Polish deli people (Derby, CT) said kiszka and kaszanka are the same. Who am I to argue, except that the wikipedia pictures for kaszanka look more like our Estonian verivorst (blood sausage) than the pictures for kiszka. (Both pictures taste the same).
pawian 176 | 13,997
22 Dec 2020 #55
said kiszka and kaszanka are the same

Coz they are. Also krupniok is the same as kaszanka and kiszka.

dobrakielbasa.pl/krupniok/


Home / Food / Do you call it kiszka or kaszanka?
BoldItalic [quote]
 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary username or login and post as a member.