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Short Polish<->English translations


OnHereRightNow    
24 Apr 2018  #601
Merged:

------Poluś--------



Poluś is the shortening of ''Polanski'' or ''Paluch''? Im curious about that.
Looker - | 987    
25 Apr 2018  #602
POLUŚ

I don't think it's from Paluch.
Nickidewbear 20 | 555    
18 Jun 2018  #603
Merged:

Translation Help With Marriage Document



szukajwarchiwach.pl/63/167/0/1/26/skan/full/46G676RGbzEs27jTBRGsnw - The marriage document of "Wojciech" Danilowicz and Maryanna Krusinska

PS Keep in mind that we were Anusim, too.
kaprys 1 | 1,355    
19 Jun 2018  #604
The handwriting is really difficult to read and I can't really find these names on that page. Which entry is it?
All I know for sure is that the entries come from November 1819.
Do the entries mention forced conversion? Perhaps they were frankists - assuming they were of Jewish origin.
Looker - | 987    
19 Jun 2018  #605
I see different names on this document. Mr Szymanski - groom, and Maryanna Izbicka (?), family name Maciszewska - bride.
There are also different names too (another couple?), but no Danilowicz or Krusinska, as far as I can see.
Nickidewbear 20 | 555    
21 Jun 2018  #606
(To Kaprys, too)

They did give me the wrong image, then. Let me see if I can pull up the right one. And we were Jews. I even subsequently found that Great-Granddad's grandmother "Katarzyna" had siblings with very-Jewish names, Shoshanna and Mattityahu (their Polish equivalents in the secular records being Zuzanna and Mateusz), and her father's name was Abram with the secular "Wojciech" (which was used for Adalbert or Avraham). She had a brother named Mendel whom died in 1841 in Filipow.

geneteka.genealodzy.pl/index.php?op=gt&lang=eng&bdm=B&w=10pl&rid=B&search_lastname=Danilowicz&search_name=Wojciech&search_lastname2=&search_name2=&from_date=1793&to_date=1913&rpp1=&ordertable=

PS Here's the correct image. They put it as Record 30, giving a mislead that it was Image 30.
szukajwarchiwach.pl/63/167/0/1/26/skan/full/-wWZeCQNyvqm49RylXPqjg

PPS I'm pretty sure that my great-granduncle "Susi" was not named for his grandaunt, as "Susi" is a Yiddish form of Joseph or Yosef. Also, keep in mind that we were Anusim at least by 1843. Remember that the baptism certificate did talk about "neglect of the parents" as the excuse for why "Katarzyna" was not baptized until she was four.
kaprys 1 | 1,355    
21 Jun 2018  #607
They might have been frankists (roughly the time mentioned- you can google them) or just converts. I doubt they were forced to do it.
I won't be able to see much on my mobile. I will check it later.
BTW, they often used Latin names in church records that's why Wojciech-Adalbert, Zofia-Sophia.
Nickidewbear 20 | 555    
21 Jun 2018  #608
The issue is a little more complicated than that. See the Jewish Virtual Library's article on it.
jewishvirtuallibrary.org/anusim-jewish-virtual-library
PS Ashkenazi Anusim aren't discussed enough, and we ("Anusim" including B'nei Anusim here) get (so to speak) the shaft or short end of the stick on that one.

PS I looked up the equivalent for "Wojciech" and then used the JewishGen given names reference to find what was his Hebrew name. Also, someone actually sent me a picture of my great-great-grandfather Julian's grave, and I can tell that it is in total disrepair partly because we don't have relatives whom maintained it, unlike some others (including other sides of the family) whom either had relatives or other loved ones whom were willing to maintain their graves (whether openly Jewish or Anusim, regardless of their belief in Jesus or lack thereof) or were gentiles (e.g., for example, apparently, my grandaunt Helen Wojnar's husband's family. Incidentally, her granddaughter Ashley took umbrage when I mentioned that her grandfather, my in-law granduncle Leo Wojnar, looks Iraqi Jewish. I can't help that she hates her possible Jewish heritage on that side that much.).

This is all from the same cemetery, by the way.

1) Here, a (believe or not) rapist cousin's grave was maintained.
drive.google.com/file/d/0B5QWcgxMPFoGN1JJZ1lHT1RTSzg/view
PS I was very surprised when I found the record on Ancestry. I have no idea whether his wife was his and his accomplice's victim, by the way.

2) drive.google.com/file/d/0B5QWcgxMPFoGcXk3YVFJREk3V00/view
Great-Great-Granddad's grave in part, and this even despite that he donated to the Free Poland fund that was being collected at the time. It sadly goes to show what at least some of them in that area think of whom they even suspect to be Jewish.

3) drive.google.com/file/d/0B5QWcgxMPFoGWWlYV3NRVVZabzA/view
Another picture
drive.google.com/file/d/0B5QWcgxMPFoGbzNlcU1WbzJIRmM/view
and another

4) drive.google.com/file/d/0B5QWcgxMPFoGNjFSZVExVV8yV1U/view
Some of the graves near his are nice, clean, polished, or at least relatively so.

5) drive.google.com/file/d/0B5QWcgxMPFoGZEhsQVFHcUhaWnc/view
A gravestone put up only 22 years later, and it's in a lot better condition. He was probably a relative of another in-law granduncle, by the way.
kaprys 1 | 1,355    
21 Jun 2018  #609
It's really difficult to decipher and I'm not sure of certain things. Perhaps others will fill in the blanks. The handwriting is hard to read, the sentences are long and complicated and the language is old-fashioned. The translation will be very clumsy, I'm afraid.

In Krasne [?] on 25th November 1819 (?) in the afternoon (?). Wojciech Daniłowicz aged 35 (??), a farmer, assisted by his mother Katarzyna (maiden name Hołubowicz(?)) and Maryanna Krasińska/Krusińska (?) appeared in front of the civil clerks of Gmina Wigierska (?) Office in Powiat Dombrowski (original spelling) in Augustów Voivodoship. (Krusińska) showed a record from the Wigry Church confirming she was 28 (?) and lived with her parents Jan Krusiński (?) {...............?}. Parties stated that they wanted to get married confirming that banns of marriage done in front of our office on the 14th and 21st November.

I find it hard to decipher the rest of the entry but as I understand it, the couple were married then assisted by witnesses (?)Szymon (?) Jaroszewski, aged 50, Jan Jaroszewski(?), aged 47 Franciszek Daniłowicz, aged 54(?) and Dominik Daniłowicz, aged 44. The act was read to the people involved as they were illiterate.

As far as I can tell, nothing in the record says they were of Jewish origin. So basically that part of your family was Christian about 200 years ago.

What makes you think they were Jewish?

I know who were Anusim but I doubt Jews were forced to convert to Christianity in Poland. One of the reasons why there were so many Jews in Poland was that they were free to practice their religion. There were conversions of course. For example, if they wanted to marry a Christian. There were also frankists - the followers of Jacob Frank. In 1759 Jacob Frank and about two thousand of his followers were baptised. I think there were more conversions like that among them, although from what I have read they didn't exactly treat Christianity as the bishops would have wanted. The last frankist was baptised around 1820 so as you can see we're talking about the time period your church records come from.

As for the graves, well, they're not in Poland, are they?
I don't know how it works in the US but here you need to make a payment every 20 years at the cementary. Also it's up to the family to maintain the grave in a good condition. The quality of stone used for the tombstone also varies so some get worn out earlier. As for your greatgrandfather's grave, it's about 100 years old so it's been through tens of summers and winters that might have influenced its condition. If it bothers you, why don't you visit and take care of it. I mean, even if he had donated to Free Poland Fund, that was over 100 years ago ... All the people involved are long dead and they can't take care of his grave.

As for your cousin, I don't know how likely she is to be Jewish or not, but I don't think making comments about her father's looks will win her heart :)
Nickidewbear 20 | 555    
30 Jun 2018  #610
Merged:

Translation Help With A Death Document



familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-91J1-77L?i=8&cc=1807365 (membership required) - The death document of Osip Yuriev Andrulevich. I could only translate the index, etc. with Google Translate. He apparently was buried at the Polish Cathedral, or at least that's where they noted the death and kept the record.
Nickidewbear 20 | 555    
30 Jun 2018  #611
...In Krasne [?] on 25th November 1819 (?)...

They didn't know Polish as a written language at all. In fact, their granddaughter-in-law Alexandria's first (or at least) primary language was Yiddish. BTW, the banns a week apart reflect a Jewish tradition of not seeing each other for a week.

chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/465164/jewish/Separation-of-Bride-and-Groom.htm
BTW, I notice that he did not show a record, and they appeared before the civil office in the church. There was no synagogue in Wigry, Krasne, etc.. The closest one was in Krasnopol.

What makes you think they were Jewish?

I know who were Anusim but I doubt Jews were forced to convert to Christianity in Poland.

They were in the Pale and under psychological duress. See, e.g., "Poles In the USA" as well.

sp24tarnow.pl/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Gabriela-Poros%C5%82o-Wiktoria-Fila.pdf

As for the graves, well, they're not in Poland, are they?
I don't know how it works in the US but here you need to make a payment every 20 years at the cementary. Also it's up to the family to maintain the grave in a good condition. The quality of stone used for the tombstone also varies so some get worn out earlier. As for your greatgrandfather's grave, it's about 100 years old so it's been through tens of summers and winters that might have influenced its condition. If it bothers you, why don't you visit and take care of it. I mean, even if he had donated to Free Poland Fund, that was over 100 years ago ... All the people involved are long dead and they can't take care of his grave.

I don't think making comments about her father's looks will win her heart :)

I meant it as a compliment.
kaprys 1 | 1,355    
30 Jun 2018  #612
I'm not registered. Do you want to download it or make a print screen to let me have a look?
As for the previous record - nothing seems to confirm they were Jewish. No mention of wyznanie mojzeszowe/starozakonne.
None of these first or last names sound Jewish/Yiddish. And they were illiterate as farmers/peasants back then were.
Banns of marriage were a normal thing really.
And then you have your ancestors' graves at Catholic cementaries. Do you have any records confirming their ancestors were Jewish? And even if they were, they and their descendants would have married people of other religions (assuming they converted to Catholicism, most likely other Catholics).

Well, you might have Jewish ancestors. But also Catholic, Protestant or Christian Orthodox ones (even Muslim!) - we're talking about 19th century partitioned Poland. Ethnically there are even more possibilities.
Nickidewbear 20 | 555    
2 Jul 2018  #613
As for the previous record - nothing seems to confirm they were Jewish...

Certainly, we were ethnically Jewish; and especially Ashkenazi Anusim have a complicated history among Anusim. I could go into all the reasons, too (and remember, e.g., how "Katarzyna" was not baptized until she was four due to "neglect of the parents"?). PS I downloaded it. Meanwhile, there are multiple Anduleviches, etc., noted on JewishGen, and one of Great-Great-Grandma's brothers(?) was confirmed to have been a Jew by his Burgess descendants (The Andruleviches, etc. are kohanim.). I should mention, too, that Wojciech's father was deceased at the time and his in-law father ill (He died in 1820; Michal Danilowicz in 1810), thus why his mother had to help him (The fathers walk the groom down the aisle, the mothers the bride, at Jewish weddings.

Well, you might have Jewish ancestors.

PS: Wow! I just found more proof that the Andruleviches are Jews! (Literally, my reaction was "Oh, my God! Wow!" I did not expect to find that when I went to look up info about Osip!).

svrt.ru/1914/suvalk/1914-suvalk-a.pdf

Google Translate:

"Arrow. Andrulevich Ant. Fr. Jude. Female Suwalki wounds. 08/29/1914. 61 976"


  • The original image, cropped and resized to attach here.

  • The image cropped and resized as well as with noise reduction, etc..
chicster1964 - | 2    
13 Jul 2018  #614
Merged:

Translation for Polish family list



Can anyone translate the names, dates, and other information on this family list? Having special trouble with the first line, 2nd column and name #4. Thank you.

Family

Family 2
Chemikiem 5 | 1,200    
15 Jul 2018  #615
names, dates, and other information

I will give it a go but the writing is pretty bad.

1) I cannot read the surname but the christian name in the far left column is Jan ( John ). The second column I presume are the parents' names. I can only make out Szymon ( Simon ), with the surname possibly being Rutkowskich. The third column on the right I am presumng gives information about Jan. He was born 11th January 1841 and died 12 November 1919.

2) All I can read here is that one of the parents in the second column is called Andrzej, possible surname Jurkowskich. Whatever the name in the first column is, birthdate is 19th February 1851.

3) In the first column, 2 names are mentioned, Josef and Jan. He was born 12th March 1876 and died 30th July 1898.

4) All I can make out is the name Jan and a date, 25th July 1878.

5) Part of a date. 8th ? 1880.

6) Christian name appears to be Miłosz, born 30th July 1885.

7) Possible christian name Halina, born 23rd January 1889.

8) Two people with the name Jan, one is the parent, the other the son. Birthdate 20th June ? 1889.

9) Possible christian name Bronisława. Born 15th April 1892, died 8th September 1892. Definitely a female if my guess at the name is wrong due to use of zmarła.

10) I can only make out the name Zygmunt, born 28th May 1894.

Hopefully someone else may be able to add more to this.
Looker - | 987    
15 Jul 2018  #616
I cannot read the surname

If I should be guessing, that would be Cichowicz.

surname possibly being Rutkowskich

Jurkowskich

z Jurkowskich / z Rutkowskich means from Jurkowski/Rutkowski family
2) maybe Cichowicz Marzenna / surname in the 2nd column Jankowski
6) not Miłosz, I see Wacław more
10) like Cichowicz (?) Józef, Zygmunt
Chemikiem 5 | 1,200    
16 Jul 2018  #617
Yes, I think you're right regarding Wacław. The surnames are puzzling though. It looks like there are two of them, possibly Cichowicz as you said, but I don't think this is the case in number 2 where you mentioned Marzenna, as that surname appears to end with a 'g' or 'y'. The surnames in 2,3,4 and 5 appear to be the same, ending in 'g' or 'y', and there is a different surname in 1,6,7,8,9 and 10.
Nickidewbear 20 | 555    
22 Jul 2018  #618
Can someone translate Record 16 for me?
szukajwarchiwach.pl/63/167/0/1/7/str/1/1/15/BmI6c_3tRbCt4vKfa38kYw/#tabSkany
Thank you!
Nickidewbear 20 | 555    
3 Sep 2018  #619
Merged:

Translation Needed



I'm not exactly sure what the caption is saying. PS A(n apparently-)Jewish guy (who goes by the name "Jojne Cukermann" or "Yoyne Tzukermann" has the picture as his avatar on Twitter; so, I hope that it's not self hating.


  • The image in question. "Uj(?) bedzie fpierdoc(?)"
mafketis 16 | 6,290    
3 Sep 2018  #620
I read it as a misspelling of "chuj będzie wpierdol"

chuj = peener, d1ck
będzie = will be
wpierdol means roughly @ss kicking, beatdown

that gets no google hits so it's probably meant to represent poor grammar with a meaning like "d1ck's gonna get an @ss-kicking"

native speakers will probably be able to further elucidate....
Nickidewbear 20 | 555    
3 Sep 2018  #621
That unfortunately makes sense. Google Translate did keep asking, "Did you mean 'wpierdol'?"
mafketis 16 | 6,290    
3 Sep 2018  #622
I'm not sure what's going on with uj, whether it's supposed to be chuj or some interjection (Polish dictionaries only give it as an abbreviation of the university in Krakow)

The expression "uj z tym" (according to urban dictionary) means something like "fvck it!" (forget it)
Looker - | 987    
3 Sep 2018  #623
Regarding the "Uj" - I think it's just Oj, or Ojej in Polish - Gee in English.
mafketis 16 | 6,290    
3 Sep 2018  #624
"Uj" - I think it's just Oj

Or Yiddish "Oy"? In that case a translation might be "Oy! There's gonna be a beatdown"
Nickidewbear 20 | 555    
4 Sep 2018  #625
Could be. I am not liking what the meme seems to be saying (unless, of course, the person in question is saying that he'll defend himself against those whom make fun of him), and I glad that I asked for a translation.
Stacey124068    
4 Sep 2018  #626
Merged:

Looking for translation



Hi, trying to translate something my grandad always said.. I was always taught he was saying "I love you stacey my darling". The closest I can seem to get is "ya Ciebe Kocham stacey moi kochanie".. does this make any sense at all? My nan was polish but her language was broken as she left Poland early during the war..
mafketis 16 | 6,290    
4 Sep 2018  #627
"ya Ciebe Kocham stacey moi kochanie".

Ja ciebie kocham, Stacey, moje kochanie.

I love you, Stacey, my darling.

not necessarily the most idiomatic way to say it in modern Polish but quite recognizable
TomUK    
4 Sep 2018  #628
Merged:

Translation Needed - Proposal



Hello all,

I'm planning to ask for my girlfriend's hand in marriage...but first I wish to ask for her father's blessing. Only hitch is that he doesn't speak a word of English and I'm at 'idiot-beginner' stage of learning Polish. So can anyone help translate the below for me? I'll attempt to pronounce it all and failing that hand him a written note :)

I wish to ask him "I love Kasia very much and tomorrow I would like to ask for her hand in marriage. Clearly you care for her greatly too and so I very much hope that you will approve. Please let me know that my proposal will be with your blessing" or words to that effect.

It sounds a little clumsy but I want to be short because a) I'll need to find a short window alone with him to ask b) I wish to give him the chance to respond but it kinda of needs to be in a 'tak or nie' format.

Thanks so much for any help you can give me. I'm horribly nervous but it would mean a lot to me for him to give me his blessing.

thanks
Tom
mafketis 16 | 6,290    
4 Sep 2018  #629
I wish to ask him "I love Kasia very much and t

That'll just sound stupid in Polish. Ask a friend of Kasia's (or Kasia herself) to write something short and suitable that won't make you sound like a Harlequin romance novel come to life....
TomUK    
5 Sep 2018  #630
to be honest mafketis it sound stupid in English. I guess I'm trying to simplify what I'll say. I don't wish to ask Kasia for obvious reasons (I haven't proposed to her yet) and I don't really want to ask anyone we know as I want Kasia to be the first person to know my intention.



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