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Short Polish<->English translations


Lyzko 36 | 8,457
28 May 2022 #991
Great! My, what an excellent source of useful info!!
I take it you are an educated Polish native speaker, yes?
Trust my constant queries don't irk you:-)
mafketis 34 | 12,491
5 Jun 2022 #992
Weird question that occasionally comes to mind.

During the PRL the Soviet Union was officially Związek Radziecki (occasionally Kraj Rad) a Polish translation of the original meaning of Russian sovet (rada).

But now Sowiecki seems to be far more common.... anyone know when/why/how this happened?
Alien 12 | 1,962
5 Jun 2022 #993
"Soviet/sowjecki/Sowjeci" has a negative meaning in Polish language. Therefore it was not used during the PRL. Now is different.
Cojestdocholery 2 | 1,833
5 Jun 2022 #994
But now Sowiecki seems to be far more common.... anyone know when/why/how this happened?

It was used before 1939 (sowiecki) only after 1945 in PRL they started using radziecki for same reason.
pawian 194 | 19,828
6 Jun 2022 #995
Therefore it was not used during the PRL.

It was but by Polish exile emigration in the West, the opposition in Poland and other people rejecting the regime. We sang Rota with changed words in 1980s - Soviet instead of German - aż się rozleci w proch i pył, sowiecka zawierucha. I also read general Ander`s book about Katyń - he used Soviet, not radziecki.

But now Sowiecki seems to be far more common..

Because it is more patriotic to say so. :):)
Daisy Szafranska - | 1
21 Jun 2022 #996
Hello all. I am wanting to translate a verse from Walt Whitman's "O Me, O Life" poem to honor my great grandmother. I feel this poem describes her outlook on life and I would be very grateful if someone can help me. I really want the translation to speak and read as it would be spoken in Polish, and not just what Google Translate thinks it should be.

The quote from the poem I need help with is:

That you are here - that life exists and identy,
That the powerful play goes on, and you may contribute a verse.
Lyzko 36 | 8,457
21 Jun 2022 #997
Walt Whitman in Polish. Just about as tantalizing as Mickiewicz in English. Oh, it's been done, but it's almost like reading a different author, no?
GefreiterKania 15 | 1,690
21 Jun 2022 #998
That you are here - that life exists and identy,
That the powerful play goes on, and you may contribute a verse.

"Że tu jesteś - że istnieje życie i tożsamość
Że sztuka trwa i także Ty dopisać możesz wers."

lubimyczytac.pl/cytat/286022
Lyzko 36 | 8,457
21 Jun 2022 #999
Interesting here that "sztuka" can mean both art as well as drama or play, depending solely on the respective context.
jon357 71 | 21,060
21 Jun 2022 #1,000
play

And and of course "a play" (for something) doubtless also in Whitman's mind.
jon357 71 | 21,060
21 Jun 2022 #1,002
Trwa for goes on isn't perfect either since it doesn't capture progress and vitality.
Lyzko 36 | 8,457
22 Jun 2022 #1,003
It does though capture the sense of duration.
kie 13 | 42
4 Jul 2022 #1,004
Dzien Dobry, when would you use 'nadziej umiera ostatnia'? Obviously it translates `hope dies last', but what does that mean? Is it positive (like dont give up) or negative (it's all in vain)? Dziękuję bardzo.
pawian 194 | 19,828
4 Jul 2022 #1,005
Is it positive (like dont give up) or negative (it's all in vain)?

It depends on the intonation you apply. If you say it enthusiastically, then it is positive. If in a morose tone coz you know all is lost, it is negative.

what does that mean?

We are in a hopeless situation but still fight on and wait for a miracle.
kie 13 | 42
4 Jul 2022 #1,006
@pawian
super, dziekuję bardzo
kie 13 | 42
22 Jul 2022 #1,007
Czesc, how do you say 'he wipes the floor with them'? as in, he beats them with ease. Dziękuję.
ForumUser
23 Jul 2022 #1,008
@kie

"Wycierać podłogę nim/nią/nimi" (Imperfective) or "Wytrzeć..." (Perfective, no present tense)

"Nim" = Masculine/neuter singular object, "Nią" = Feminine singular object, and "Nimi" = Plural objects

"(On/Ona/Ono) Wyciera..." = Imperfective present tense, 3rd-person singular Masculine/Feminine/Neuter subject

"(On/Ona/Ono) Wytrze..." = Perfective future tense, also 3rd-person singular Masculine/Feminine/Neuter subject

Oops my bad, the slang form might instead be in the format of "Wycierać or Wytrzeć nim/nią/nimi podłogę"
kie 13 | 42
18 Aug 2022 #1,009
@ForumUser
thank you very much
pawian 194 | 19,828
19 Aug 2022 #1,010
super, dziekuję bardzo

Not at all. It was my pleasure to help you. Poles are like that - helpful and supportive.
Lyzko 36 | 8,457
19 Aug 2022 #1,011
In English too, there's "Hope springs eternal."
EnglishFolkie
19 Sep 2022 #1,012
Merged:

"Hej sokoły" translation



Hi, I'm an Englishman trying to translate 'Hej sokoły' for fun. (I'm sure there are many other beautiful Polish songs but It has such an addictive melody, and refrain)

I'm finding it difficult to translate the chorus. I think Sokoly tranlates to Falcon, however 'Falcon' sound wrong, it needs to be a three syllable word. I'm thinking of changing it to another bird of prey, but I don't want to mess with any meaning or cultural symbolism that I don't know about. I'm a folk singer so preserving the symbolism is important to me.

So...
1. Does the falcon have any particular significance in Polish culture/symbolism.
2. Are there any other birds of prey in Poland that have a strong cultural resonance.

If anyone can help me out, I promise I'll try and learn the song in Polish!
pawian 194 | 19,828
19 Sep 2022 #1,013
Does the falcon have any particular significance in Polish culture/symbolism.

Yes, Polish hunters used falcons quite extensively in the past. Royal falcon keepers earned a fortune.
Falcons are still used at airports today.
ptaki.akcjalokalna.org/spotkania/sokoly-na-lotnisku/

Falcon is the name of a Polish helicopter.





EnglishFolkie
20 Sep 2022 #1,014
Thank you very much.
Having delved a little deeper, falconry seems to have quite rich history within Poland, as does the connection between bird hunting and the Steppe (which features heavily in the song.)

To be honest It's a little too much to faithfully reflect in translation, especially for an amateur like me who doesn't speak the language. So I'm tempted to do what folkies do, steal the tune and use different lyrics! There should be something in the Childe Ballads (the archive of traditional English folk music) that fits the tune (sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/child/index.htm)

1. Would it be appropriate for me run completely different lyrics to the tune? I don't want step on anyone's toes.
2. Is there an archive of traditional music in Poland, like the Childe Ballads?
3. Does anyone know an accessible pronunciation guide that helps with phonics? so that I can learn the song in Polish?
pawian 194 | 19,828
20 Sep 2022 #1,015
Would it be appropriate for me run completely different lyrics to the tune?

Yes, as long as you don`t change the topic completely. e.g, describing how you failed as a lover at your last date. etc.

accessible pronunciation guide that helps with phonics?

Google translate and press the sound icon.

falconry seems to have quite rich history within Poland,

Yes!
As a child, one of the books in our home library I extremely liked due to its colourful illustrations was the book on hunting in the past Poland. This picture was on the cover:



pawian 194 | 19,828
20 Sep 2022 #1,016
Are there any other birds of prey in Poland that have a strong cultural resonance.

Probably an eagle. It is quite popular in Poland. Even used as the national emblem. :):)

Here, carried by hussaria winged riders:





Kashub1410 4 | 460
21 Sep 2022 #1,017
@pawian
Have anyone commented your decision making skills before by any chance?
pawian 194 | 19,828
22 Sep 2022 #1,018
anyone commented your decision making skills

I don`t remember now coz I am too busy. But I suppose my students comment on those skills each time I assign a big or small test to them. And those comments aren`t too favourable, I suppose.

Is it what you meant????
EnglishFolkie
22 Sep 2022 #1,019
Yes, as long as you don`t change the topic completely. e.g, describing how you failed as a lover at your last date. etc.

Don't worry, I wouldn't want to memorialise that kind of experience in song.

The Eagle is a good but still two syllables. I was able to reverse image search the picture and look more the artist work, which I found helpful. Thank you
pawian 194 | 19,828
22 Sep 2022 #1,020
it needs to be a three syllable word

Oops, I somehow skipped that one.
My proposition:
krogulec - sparrow hawk. It isn`t as popular as a hawk, falcon or eagle but is still recognizable. It is small but crazy, as the saying goes.


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