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Mixed English Grammar Thread


Lyzko
13 Jun 2011 #121
Best analogy is: Which is more proper vs. which is generally acceptable? "It is I.." is technically grammatically correct, but most everyone says "It's me.", without losing a moment's sleep over it-:)
teflcat 5 | 1,032
13 Jun 2011 #122
Little Johnny made a mistake in his English homework. The exercise was on the past perfect. See if you can punctuate this:

Where Johnny had had had had had had been the right answer.
Marynka11 4 | 676
13 Jun 2011 #123
Where Johnny had had had, had had had been the right answer.
More or less?
OP Antek_Stalich 5 | 997
13 Jun 2011 #124
Where Johnny had had "had had", "had" had been the right answer.
Maaarysia
13 Jun 2011 #125
Where Johny had had "had", "had had" had been the right answer.

Antek_Stalich

You forgot one had ;>
OP Antek_Stalich 5 | 997
13 Jun 2011 #126
Girls were better than I ;-)

ou forgot one had ;>

No, all of us had 6 "had", count, please.
teflcat 5 | 1,032
13 Jun 2011 #127
When I was at school we were told to avoid ending sentences with a preposition. How about this one. Dad goes downstairs to get a book for his daughter's bedtime story. Unfortunately, his choice was met with disapproval:

Daddy, why did you bring that book I don't want to be read to out of up for?

Makes sense to me.
Maaarysia
13 Jun 2011 #128
to my mind one too many x had

I thought that the sense is that he should had "had had" instead of one "had". Everything sums up :)
teflcat 5 | 1,032
13 Jun 2011 #129
Where Johny had had "had", "had had" had been the right answer.

Sorry Maaarysia. There are two Ns in Johnny.
Maaarysia
13 Jun 2011 #130
Daddy, why did you bring that book I don't want to be read to out of up for?

Can someone translate it?

Sorry Maaarysia. There are two Js in Johnny.

So Marynka won... but she hadn't had the "" ;)
Wroclaw 44 | 5,384
13 Jun 2011 #131
I thought that the sense is that he should had "had, had" instead of one "had". Everything sums up :)

i edited and binned my reply when i realized i might be wrong.
Maaarysia
13 Jun 2011 #132
clever move, but you wasn't enough fast ;)

No, all of us had 6 "had", count, please.

because you edited it you little cheater ;)
Marynka11 4 | 676
13 Jun 2011 #133
So Marynka won... but she hadn't had the "" ;)

I think italic looks more elegant.
OP Antek_Stalich 5 | 997
13 Jun 2011 #134
I understand the "book" sentence but after having sorted it out in 50%, I was still left with too many words.

Antek_Stalich: No, all of us had 6 "had", count, please.

because you edited it you little cheater ;)

No, pay attention: My "had" sentence was different from yours, probably wrong, still makes sense to me.
teflcat 5 | 1,032
13 Jun 2011 #135
I think italic looks more elegant.

Excellent, Maaarysia! Italics are fine, of course, but how do you write them in longhand?
Marynka11 4 | 676
13 Jun 2011 #136
I understand the "book" sentence but after having it sorted out in 50%, I was still left with too many words.

All of the words are needed. I don't know how to punctuate it though. I have no idea about it in English.

Here is the sense
Daddy, why did you bring that book up(stairs) for?
I don't want to be read to (by you=daddy) out of (the book).
Maaarysia
13 Jun 2011 #137
No, pay attention: My "had" sentence was different from yours, probably wrong, still makes sense to me.

Ok, so you also won :)
Marynka11 4 | 676
13 Jun 2011 #138
Excellent, Maaarysia! Italics are fine, of course, but how do you write them in longhand?

Maarysia and Marynka are 2 different female specimens. I have the number 11 at the end.

If I wrote by hand I would have used the quotation marks of course.
teflcat 5 | 1,032
13 Jun 2011 #139
I don't know how to punctuate it though.

No punctuation needed.
OP Antek_Stalich 5 | 997
13 Jun 2011 #140
Ok, so you also won :)

There are no winners, them are all losers... :D

The sentences of yours and Marynka were probably correct by the author's intention.
Marynka got the "book" sentence right! I though it should be a single sentence? Ay, a comma and we are there! Bravo!
Perfectdad
13 Jun 2011 #141
When I was at school we were told to avoid ending sentences with a preposition.

Why did you bring that book I don't want to be read to out of up for, Daddy?
Seanus 15 | 19,706
13 Jun 2011 #142
Ziemowit, what do you mean? If I were is 'if + subject + past simple' in grammatical form.

Post 126 is almost perfect. He 'had had' had (meaning he selected had as his answer) but 'had had' WAS the right answer.

He 'had had' had implies that he changed it to sth else (from had) but let's not complicate it.
OP Antek_Stalich 5 | 997
14 Jun 2011 #143
Seanus, could it be we had had some language-barrier in the "food" thread? It seems to me when you say the adjective "Polish" you only mean the original concepts or products of Poland. In Polish, we use the adjective "polski" for anything that is made in Poland, too, despite of the origin of the idea of the product. If I say, "Polski Fiat", I'm not saying Fiat cars were conceived or designed in Poland, If I said "Polish Fiat" you would probably correct me and said Fiat cars were Italian. Am I right? If yes, I should say: "Heinz here is Polish-made ketchup" and there would be no confusion, right?

The question is vital since the use of such adjectives appears to me one of the major "translator's false friends", so I'd better be assured.

Then:
Where Johnny had had had had, had had been the right answer.
Is such sentence wrong? Johnny had had selected had had while had had been the right answer...
Isn't the problem ambiguous here?

Finally: Are we being discouraged to use prepositions at the end of sentences? Make me sure of it.
teflhead
14 Jun 2011 #144
When I was at school we were told to avoid ending sentences with a preposition.

So were we. I told the teacher, "This is bull.shit of the highest order, up with which I will not put"
delphiandomine 88 | 18,455
14 Jun 2011 #145
In Polish, we use the adjective "polski" for anything that is made in Poland, too, despite of the origin of the idea of the product.

You'd be better to say "Heinz products are made in Poland for the Polish market" to avoid confusion.

But yes, you're right - in English, just because it's made in Poland, doesn't make it Polish. For instance, VW cars are most definitely German - Polish-built, but the products themselves are German.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
14 Jun 2011 #146
Exactly, delph. It's an important distinction.
Ziemowit 13 | 4,431
14 Jun 2011 #147
Ziemowit, what do you mean? If I were is 'if + subject + past simple' in grammatical form.

If 'if I were' is 'if + subject + past simple', it should be 'If I was' as an affirmative sentence in past simple should use "was" rather than "were" with the first person singular. How would you expalain that you used "If I were taller..." rather than "If I was taller.." ?
Seanus 15 | 19,706
14 Jun 2011 #148
Personal preference but I think was is far more to the point and correct.
Maaarysia
14 Jun 2011 #149
Possession in questions

Ok, now I found a sentences like below:

- How much of the money is Adam's?
- How much of the money is yours?

How would you form a similar sentence using the word bank?
Seanus 15 | 19,706
14 Jun 2011 #150
the bank's

theirs


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