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Mixed English Grammar Thread


Maaarysia
14 Jun 2011 #151
How much of the money is the bank's? Ok...
How about: How many of the guns is the police's????
Seanus 15 | 19,706
14 Jun 2011 #152
How many of the guns belong to the police? :)
Maaarysia
14 Jun 2011 #153
Ok, I must admit it was a stupid question... Thanks anyway :)
Seanus 15 | 19,706
14 Jun 2011 #154
It's always worth being sure :)
zetigrek
17 Jan 2013 #155
Should it be "Anything to do with that" or "Nothing to do with that" if I mean "Nothing of that sort"?
Wroclaw 44 | 5,384
17 Jan 2013 #156
"Nothing to do with that"

it has nothing to do with that

it doesn't have anything to do with that
zetigrek
17 Jan 2013 #157
Thanks Wroclaw :)

it has nothing to do with thatit doesn't have anything to do with that

Can use here have got as well?
Wroclaw 44 | 5,384
17 Jan 2013 #158
I have got nothing to do with that. ... I haven't got anything to do with that

I have got nothing to do with it .... It has got

Careful: the above doesn't quite fit with your original ..... "Nothing of that sort"

'got' makes have/possession stronger.
pam
17 Jan 2013 #159
Can use here have got as well?

No.
You could say ' It hasn't got anything to do with that', but you can't say ' It hasn't got nothing to do with that', because the latter sentence is a double negative.
zetigrek
23 Jan 2013 #160
How should I understand this phrase: "the world is too much with me"?
Wroclaw 44 | 5,384
24 Jan 2013 #161
try this or similar: sparknotes.com/poetry/wordsworth/section4.rhtml
Vincent 9 | 848 Moderator
24 Jan 2013 #162
How should I understand this phrase: "the world is too much with me"?

At first glance, it doesn't look right or sound right. Here is an old poem called "The world is too much for us" which may help to explain your query.

shmoop.com/world-is-too-much-with-us/lines-1-8-summary.html
zetigrek
24 Jan 2013 #163
It's not from the poem, it's from an interview. What does it mean to be too much with somebody. I understand to be too much for somebody = too much to handle. Does using "with" change the meaning?

At first glance, it doesn't look right or sound right. Here is an old poem called "The world is too much for us"

Ok, to be precise it goes: "I think the world was possibly too much with me"
Vincent 9 | 848 Moderator
24 Jan 2013 #164
Ok, to be precise it goes: "I think the world was possibly too much with me"

I would say "for me" is correct, and "with" just doesn't sound right. Maybe one of our English teachers on PF will give a proper answer soon.
zetigrek
27 Jan 2013 #165
Is there a difference between can't have done and couldn't have done?
pawian 178 | 15,558
6 Jun 2021 #166
When can we say nobody knows nothing? . I saw it several times but doesn`t it conflict with the rule of avoiding the double negation in a sentence?

I would use nobody knows anything but the exercise requires nothing.
Or is it possible to say: anybody knows nothing?
Eurola 4 | 1,909
6 Jun 2021 #167
can't ha

can't have donesounds better can't have it done (needs a reason why it can't be done)
Couldn't have done it - might be a form of regret
Vincent 9 | 848 Moderator
6 Jun 2021 #168
When can we say nobody knows nothing?

"Nobody knows nothing" is colloquial language in the UK, so I guess the double negation wouldn't matter. "Nobody knows anything" is formal and correct.
pawian 178 | 15,558
6 Jun 2021 #169
Oh, thanks, I suspected it but wasn`t sure. I was doing English Olympic competition test with the kid and I had a problem how to wiggle out of what I had said earlier about double negation.
pawian 178 | 15,558
9 Jun 2021 #171
This triple negation is possible coz only double negation isn`t.
mafketis 25 | 9,327
9 Jun 2021 #172
double negation isn`t.

double negation (technically 'negative concord') is frowned upon in formal usage but quite common and unambiguous in spoken English

US version:

He didn't say nothing. (stressing both didn't and nothing) = he said something

He didn't say nothing. (only stressing nothing usually pronounced nothin' ) = he didn't say anything (and he should have or I was expecting him to say something).
pawian 178 | 15,558
9 Jun 2021 #173
but quite common and unambiguous in spoken English

Somehow, I can`t get no satisfaction from common English, I feel the need to speak like the Queen.
mafketis 25 | 9,327
9 Jun 2021 #174
I feel the need to speak like the Queen.

Ready for your close up?

paw
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,846
9 Jun 2021 #175
You won't never do that Pawian....luckily for you.....nobody speaks like the Queen except....the Queen.
pawian 178 | 15,558
9 Jun 2021 #176
I have done better stunts in my life. You would be surprised.... :):)
pawian 178 | 15,558
9 Jun 2021 #178
First I got shocked reading your description of the queen coz I read it too fast and somehow imagined the first letters are rearranged. Phew!

Exactly, anybody is a stunt at the age of 99.
pawian 178 | 15,558
9 Jun 2021 #180
It was a trap!!


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