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Mixed English Grammar Thread


rozumiemnic 8 | 3,846
11 Jun 2011 #61
Most Brits say "If I was..." vs. "If I were.."

no we do not...:) Even my kid says "If I were you" AND he knows its the "subjunctive"..:)))... mind you he has got a pedantic old bat for a mum...;)
Maaarysia
11 Jun 2011 #62
Byłbym obywatelem polskim, mógłbym właścicielem swojego domu we Warszawie.

Gdybym był polskim obywatelem, to byłbym (or mógłbym być) właścicielem swojego domu w Warszawie.

'If only I hadn't invested' is correct but I think you just made a typo.

Yeah, a typo :)
Lyzko
11 Jun 2011 #63
Granted, the English DO tend to their grammar more assiduously then we do in the States))

Uj, Maaryśiuczku!!!! Straszne moje błędy....Dzięki-:)
Maaarysia
11 Jun 2011 #64
EVERYBODY, NOBODY, NO ONE, SOMEONE - verb with or without "S"?

Ok, call me a lazy because probably I can check it in a grammar book, but I always have problem with it.

If somebody want(s) to be famous
Nobody want(s) to be famous
Do (does) anybody want to be famous?
Everybody want(s) to be famous

So with "s" or without?
Seanus 15 | 19,706
11 Jun 2011 #66
'Call me a lazy person' or 'call me lazy'. Lazy is an adjective, Maaarysia, so we don't count it.

Sb wants, correct
Nobody wants, correct
Does anybody want, correct
Everybody wants, correct
ItsAllAboutME 3 | 270
11 Jun 2011 #67
a person is countable.
a lazy person is perfectly correct grammatically. most people would say, call me lazy, though.
Maaarysia
11 Jun 2011 #68
Everybody wants, correct

And never Everybody want?

Btw. how do we spell no one: no one or no-one?

a lazy person is perfectly correct grammatically. most people would say, call me lazy, though.

I have written call me a lazy... but it also was a typo ;)
Seanus 15 | 19,706
11 Jun 2011 #69
All (people) present want.... is good :) :)

English has some tough ones. For example, Maaarysia, this is to you specifically. Which of the following sentences is correct:

The police is fully capable of handling the problem

The police are fully capable of handling the problem??

Be prepared to justify your answer, please.

Oh, it's no-one or nobody :) :)

Maaarysia, 'I wrote' and not 'I have written' ;) ;)
Lyzko
11 Jun 2011 #70
Noone NOT "no one"!!!

As follows:

Noone knowS....
Everyone knowS.....
None of us knowS the truth....

Some of us know...
All of us know.....
Both of us know....
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,846
11 Jun 2011 #71
no-one..:)
Or it looks as though it rhymes with Lorna Doone.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
11 Jun 2011 #72
Lyzko, neither of us knows or neither of us know? Why?
OP Antek_Stalich 5 | 997
11 Jun 2011 #73
Btw. how do we spell no one: no one or no-one?

I think it is just a matter or personal taste.
..

I have written call me a lazy... but it also was a typo ;)

I'm A Lazy Sod:
youtube.com/watch?v=qj4nYKVK044 ;-)

The police is fully capable of handling the problem

The organization, the force.

The police are fully capable of handling the problem??

Policemen.
Maaarysia
11 Jun 2011 #74
The police are fully capable of handling the problem??

Above is correct. I already know this one tricky ;)

Maaarysia, 'I wrote' and not 'I have written' ;) ;)

Why?
I've just written that sentence.

The organization, the force.

What about the army then? Or goverment?
It's just a silly expetion.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
11 Jun 2011 #75
Why 'are', Maaarysia? The police is a collective unit, right? It's one group, no? It's a singular entity in the eyes of people, true?

You had already written that sentence when It'sallaboutMe asked you. The action is finished and the time is finished so it's past simple.
OP Antek_Stalich 5 | 997
11 Jun 2011 #76
What about the army then? Or goverment?
It's just a silly expetion.

I don't know. I learned about the police at school.
Maaarysia
11 Jun 2011 #77
Why 'are', Maaarysia? The police is a collective unit, right? It's one group, no? It's a singular entity in the eyes of people, true?

Yes but I can swear that I've seen it somewhere as a tricky mistake. In Polish it's policja jest so you wouldn't ask me if there was no catch ;)

You had already written that sentence when It'sallaboutMe asked you. The action is finished and the time is finished so it's past simple.

But the result of the sentence is still visible and we're disccussing it... I will never get it when we use present perfect :(
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,846
11 Jun 2011 #78
Yes but Seanus 90 per cent of native speakers of English would say "the Police are", wouldn't they?
Therefore that one is correct.
I keep reminding everyone here that there is no academy of the English language and its beauty and strength lie in its flexibility and ability to adapt. ...:)
Seanus 15 | 19,706
11 Jun 2011 #79
Isn't the police one group just like the army or the govt? It's 'the' police :) Are the actions of the police any less integrated or collective than that of the army or govt, Maaarysia?
Maaarysia
11 Jun 2011 #80
No. So you say that police is investigating is correct? Generally it sounds more natural for Polish speakers, does anyone have a problem with that in Poland? Why?
Seanus 15 | 19,706
11 Jun 2011 #81
Oh, don't confuse an unravelling of logic with a declaration of position ;)

The police are is correct but I wanted you to tell me why :)
Maaarysia
11 Jun 2011 #82
I have no idea.
normalnyfacet - | 31
11 Jun 2011 #83
Isn't the police one group

one defunct pop group (if we're talking pop groups I believe the is/are depends on whether you're using British/American English, but I'm not sure which way round)
OP Antek_Stalich 5 | 997
11 Jun 2011 #84
I'd like to know for sure.

They'd called in the police. The police were in every room.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
11 Jun 2011 #85
For some odd reason, we think of the police as 'them'. It could refer to a broader scope of activities but that wouldn't stand up in court as a definitive difference. Some reverse logic. What is wrong with saying 'the army are conducting raids?'
OP Antek_Stalich 5 | 997
11 Jun 2011 #86
Only by feeling: The army operates by units, the police operates by individuals.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
11 Jun 2011 #87
Not true, AS. The police have many units and groups too. Nonetheless, they are still seen as a collective entity.
isthatu2 4 | 2,703
11 Jun 2011 #88
The police is fully capable of handling the problem

The police are fully capable of handling the problem??

Neither. When was the last time they were capable of handling anything? ;)
Serious answer, to a native speaker rather than an expert linguist it can often come down to rythem ,if I added "force",ie Police force,then there would be no problem with either sentence.

I'll leave the complicated extra info to seanus as frankly who needs a Grammar lesson from a dyslexic actor :)
strzyga 2 | 993
11 Jun 2011 #89
SINGULAR OR PLURAL
copied from the article thread

which one is better:
the initial sound in show and strength is not the same
or
the initial sounds in show and strength are not the same?

I mean, there are two words, show and strength, and each of them has its own initial sound, so logically there are two initial sounds. However, they may be identical or different.

I always get confused with sentences like this one.
Maaarysia
11 Jun 2011 #90
For some odd reason, we think of the police as 'them'.

In Poland we also say they even though Police is of a feminine gender. Ta Policja but I've never heard anyone saying ona ma teraz nabór na funcjonarszy... rather oni mają teraz nabór

What is wrong with saying 'the army are conducting raids?'

Army is more perceived as a unit.


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