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Harmless old-fashioned Polish swear words/phrases



quaggy    
9 Jan 2017  #61

My aunt would pronounce it "shok-crensh" (or something approximating that).


DominicB - | 1,822    
9 Jan 2017  #62

"shok-crensh"

Almost certainly "psia krew", which mean's "dog's blood". A rather common swear word in Poland.
johnny reb 11 | 1,812    
9 Jan 2017  #63

"Psia Krew" cross referenced to English in my Polish/English up bringing meant "son of a B."
DominicB - | 1,822    
9 Jan 2017  #64

@johnny reb

It literally means "dog's blood". It can be sometimes used like we use SOB in English, but it does not mean SOB. That would literally be "sukinsyn" in Polish. Your dictionary is not providing a literal translation, just a equivalent English phrase that sometimes, but not always, be used to convey approximately the same level of intensity and vulgarity are the Polish phrase. Sometimes other English phrases can or should be used instead, like GD, F or $hit or JC. It depends on the context.
Lyzko 13 | 2,708    
9 Jan 2017  #65

Or what about "Psia krew bydło!", if you're really *******-)
mafketis 16 | 4,022    
9 Jan 2017  #66

It can be sometimes used like we use SOB in English

I've never heard it used about a person, usually it's generalized frustration/rage, more like GD it! Sh1t! Mother!Fvck! (maybe not as strong as the last)
DominicB - | 1,822    
9 Jan 2017  #67

@mafketis

That's why I said "sometimes". It's never used for people, just as an exclamation for like when your internet connection stops working. There are many ways to "translate" it, as I said. It's never used to say anything like "He's an SOB" or "You SOB you".
johnny reb 11 | 1,812    
9 Jan 2017  #68

I know that my Polish elders had no problem saying G.D. this or J.C. that as they walked down the steps of the Catholic church right after mass.

I cured most of them when they did it by asking them if that was the same Jesus that died for them on the Cross.

There is nothing harmless about those words being used for swear words if you believe in the Ten Commandments.
NoToForeigners 5 | 583    :-(
9 Jan 2017  #69

Psia krew bydło

Never ever heard it.

What about "do diaska!"

And my all time favourite one: A niech to dunder ¶wi¶nie!!!

:)
Lyzko 13 | 2,708    
9 Jan 2017  #70

The woman from whom I'd learned this expression was hovering round about seventy in change, furthermore was an Austrian-born transplant to Lwów before WWII. Her Polish may have either been colored by local dialect speech or is/was simply a little antiquated:-))
Peter-M    
10 Jan 2017  #71

"Psia krew bydło!"..."
means: Dammit, beasts!

psia krew - (dog's blood) idiom: "dammit' or similar expression of anger, frustration
bydło - ( cattle) , idiom: 'beasts', 'brutes'

====
Do diaska! (Do diabła!) idiom and means Damn!
diasko = devil
Lyzko 13 | 2,708    
10 Jan 2017  #72

Makes perfect sense.




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