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Polish versions for English words? !


FInol
8 May 2011 #1
Maybe instead of using wherever possible English words, sometimes to the limit of stupidity, we should find some Polish replacement?

At the beginning i propose "pisemko" or "smyk" instead SMS

What are your proposals? show imagination ! : D
Lyzko
8 May 2011 #2
I'd tend to agree. The Russians seem to have far fewer such Anglicisms in common use. They have for instance their own Slavic root words for 'literatura', 'filozofia' and 'filologia', I simply can't recall what they are-:)
Bartolome 2 | 1,085
9 May 2011 #3
'literatura', 'filozofia' and 'filologia'

Since when these are Anglicisms?
Maaarysia
9 May 2011 #5
SMS

KWT = krótka wiadomość tekstowa
Magdalena 3 | 1,837
9 May 2011 #6
They have for instance their own Slavic root words for 'literatura', 'filozofia' and 'filologia', I simply can't recall what they are-:)

You can't recall them because they don't exist.

Use Google translate to check how wrong you are.
alexw68
9 May 2011 #7
Yesterday evening in the hotel, we were offered 'kolesław' with the pierogi, as the restaurant had run out of grated carrot.

Thought it was the name of our waiter for the evening, or something ...
Antek_Stalich 5 | 997
9 May 2011 #8
FInol

At the beginning i propose "pisemko" or "smyk" instead SMS

Some of us say "esesman" ;-)

I don't think anglicisms are wrong. English itself is based on so many languages, why Polish should be different?

There are at least four nations attempting to make their own words for everything. This is why the French say "ordinateur", the Swedes say "dator", the Czech say "pocitac", and the Hungarian say "szamitosgep", while the words "komputer" or "pecet" are so simple...

I like Hungarian words very much. It is so simple to guess that "szamitosgepgazda" means the PC administrator. Szamitos is a digit, gep is a device, the gazda is the Tatra landlord ;-)
OP FInol
9 May 2011 #9
Antek_Stalich
Polish versions can not be simply ? :)
Ziemowit 13 | 4,038
9 May 2011 #10
They have for instance their own Slavic root words for 'literatura', 'filozofia' and 'filologia', I simply can't recall what they are-:)

The Polish language has "piśmiennictwo", but this can be only applied in the context of writing on science and research, so what it means is in fact 'literatura naukowa', such a term being in use as well. The Russian has 'obrazowaniye' for 'education' which is what 'wykształcenie' is in Polish. All in all, 'edukacja' still seems to be a somewhat 'auxillary' term to the original Slavic term 'wykszałcenie'.
Antek_Stalich 5 | 997
9 May 2011 #11
My personal (not scientific) opinion is the invented words are really needed for nations afraid of dissolving their identity. Old, mature languages are developing by merging foreign words. Just consider:

1. Metal (it should be kowo)
2. Stal (it should be ocel)
3. Butelka (it should be łagiew)
4. Dach (it should be strzecha)
5. Pech (it should be nieszczęście (?))
6. Giermek (actually it is a child in Hungarian)
...

If by chance Magdalena is reading this thread, I'd like to know her opinion on how it is in the formal and the folk Czech. It could be interesting. I was very happy to buy "camelky" (Camel cigarettes), listening to "cedecky" (CDs) and paying with "kreditka" (credit card) on my stays in the Czech Republic.
Magdalena 3 | 1,837
9 May 2011 #12
If by chance Magdalena is reading this thread, I'd like to know her opinion on how it is in the formal and the folk Czech.

Informal Czech loves borrowings and generally uses them in a humorous or light-hearted context. Also for exaggeration. E.g. "ksicht" (Gesicht) is slang for an ugly mug; "frajle" (Fraulein) is a slightly dated informal word for an ugly and / or old lady, etc. Cédéèko or kreditka are diminutives with an affectionate overtone (as opposed to humorous). ;-)

While informal Czech (not to be confused with folk Czech, that's another kettle of fish altogether!) incorporates a ton of borrowings, formal Czech is very much a "pure" language in that it had gotten rid of lots of Latin, German, Greek, etc. loanwords in the 19th century, but at the same time acquired lots of Polish, Russian, and other Slavonic borrowings to compensate. ;-)

Can you guess what these mean?

Dějepis
Pravopis
Krasopis
Životopis
Zeměpis
Divadlo
Spisovatel
Těsnopis
Kolo

:-)
Antek_Stalich 5 | 997
9 May 2011 #13
I will try and swear I do not look to any dictionary or any translator now:
Pravopis - prawodawca
Krasopis - not sure
Životopis - autor biografii
Zeměpis - autor książek o różnych krajach? Not sure here
Divadlo - teatr
Spisovatel - pisarz
Těsnopis - no idea
Kolo - rower. The Czech word is very logical. I don't know why Polish kolarz rides a rower ;-)

What I would like to get the most would be "cena divaku" and the introduction to a seminar "Vazeny Damy a Panove" is just fantastic!

You must know this, I experienced this myself:

A Polish leads the Czech to sklep but the Czech thinks it would be a pivnice. No, but wine is stored in a Polish piwnica, and the Czech buys at sklad. We Polish store coal at skład. The shop sells "smiseny zbozi" in the Czech Republic, same shop offers "ruzny tovar" in Slovakia, and the Polish goes to "sklep spożywczo-przemysłowy. A Pole parks his car at a parking, the Czech uses parkoviste and teh Slovak parkovisko. If I wanted to say do widzenia to you Magdalena, I'd start with dovid... then bite my tongue and say nashledanou! ;-)

It's at least good I can buy struny both in your country and in Poland, although I'd better know they could be motane or hladke ;)))

Nice thing you told me about the difference between the informal and folk Czech. I was not aware of that.

Ahoj!
Magdalena 3 | 1,837
9 May 2011 #14
Pravopis - spelling, orthography / ortografia
Krasopis - calligraphy / kaligrafia
Životopis - a biography / biografia
Zeměpis - geography / geografia
Těsnopis - shorthand, stenography / stenografia

Some more to guess:
Mluvnice
Zákon
Přírodopis
Vlastenec

;-)

BTW - sklad is not "shop" in Czech. Obchod is. Sklad is pretty much the same as "skład".
Antek_Stalich 5 | 997
9 May 2011 #15
Tough language! My feeling is using words borrowed from Latin/Greek makes life somewhat easier, still I understand the idea behind the formal Czech.

Mluvnice - Mównica/rostrum? Rzeczniczka/speaker?
Zákon - prawo/law
Přírodopis - biology! Now I get it!
Vlastenec - I saw this word somewhere in Svejk... Vlast would be the power, government. No idea, I would guess from context.
Magdalena 3 | 1,837
9 May 2011 #16
Mluvnice - grammar / gramatyka
Vlastenec - patriot / patriota
Vlast - homeland / ojczyzna
Antek_Stalich 5 | 997
9 May 2011 #17
I need go back to the blackboard ;-)))))))))))))

"Past za vlast"... sure!
--
The post exchange between me and Magdalena could help the original poster understand how difficult a language with no borrowed words is. Just to extinguish the Czech debate, I'd like to ask Magdalena if a native Warsawer could master Czech.

What you think about the language here? What proficiency can you hear?

nk.art.pl/makenzen/makenzen_zatimco.mp3
Magdalena 3 | 1,837
9 May 2011 #18
...surely you mean "padnout za vlast"?
Antek_Stalich 5 | 997
9 May 2011 #19
Aaaarrrrgh! ;-))
Look up the edited post above.
Magdalena 3 | 1,837
9 May 2011 #20
What you think about the language here? What proficiency can you hear?

The long and short vowels are not quite right, the ř š è sounds are not that accurate, I can hear a distinction between "i" and "y" which is non-existent in spoken Czech. In short, I doubt it is a Czech singing - all the clues tell me it's a Polish person with a good knowledge of Czech, a Czech philologist perhaps?
Koala 1 | 332
9 May 2011 #22
I think there are very few (relatively) natively Polish words in Polish language, most of them were borrowed at some point. Which is not a bigdeal, the world around us evolves, so should the language and the simplest way for that is to import words along with technologies/phenomena that they are described with.


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