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Harmless old-fashioned Polish swear words/phrases


mafketis 35 | 11,212
18 May 2020 #121
especially since the Polish r will sound like a t between vowels to Americans (if jamiej is in fact American)

the American pronounciation of 'city' is close to syrij (using Polish spelling)
Kennyb
12 Jun 2020 #122
I remember my grandmother 'baci' saying psha nogga when flustered. I was told it means 'dogs foot'?
mafketis 35 | 11,212
12 Jun 2020 #123
I was told it means 'dogs foot'?

psianoga (as a single world) as two words, 'psia noga' it would mean 'dog's leg' or 'dog's foot' The two aren't distinguished much in everyday Polish and often 'noga' (leg) is used where (foot) might be more used in English. On the other hand dog's don't have legs (nogi) they have łapy (paws).

It's considered old fashioned and I can't say I've ever heard it...
pawian 197 | 19,921
22 Jun 2020 #124
saying psha nogga when flustered.

It must have been a century ago. Later development of the phrase was motyla noga - butterfly leg.

It's considered old fashioned and I can't say I've ever heard it...

Exactly. More common, though equally obsolete, is psiakość - dog`s bone.



mafketis 35 | 11,212
22 Jun 2020 #125
psiakość - dog`s bone.

I'm not sure if I've ever heard psiakrew (except maybe on tv) I've read it but do people really still say it?
pawian 197 | 19,921
22 Jun 2020 #126
No, it is as old fashioned as psiakość. Pity. Only k... and k.... everywhere.
mafketis 35 | 11,212
22 Jun 2020 #127
and d.... and (c)h...... too!
pawian 197 | 19,921
22 Jun 2020 #128
No, d... is quite OK, coz our President bears such surname.
TereniaBerwenia
13 Jun 2021 #129
@jon357
My mom used to say "guzik z petelka" (sorry about missing cedillas on the 1st e and a) - meaning you've gained nothing, just a useless button and the piece of cotton thread used to sew it on!
Alien
13 Jun 2021 #130
You can say also "guzik z tego masz", means the same.
MannyMansky
22 Jun 2021 #131
Sounds like chahpoosh
My father-in-law used to call our dogs that.
Can you help?
pawian 197 | 19,921
22 Jun 2021 #132
Super diminutive Ciapuś stems from diminutive Ciapek. Ciapek stems from Ciapa. Ciapa means a clumsy person - slowcoach.
Lyzko 37 | 8,557
22 Jun 2021 #133
...slow POKE, maybe? -:)
pawian 197 | 19,921
22 Jun 2021 #134
Yes, slow poke is also possible.
Novichok 3 | 6,786
22 Jun 2021 #135
Why don't you Poles switch to English as the official language and be done with diminutive and other nonsense? Like stol, krzeslo, and lawka being different genders.

I am sure that there is an explanation for this insanity.

Just curious...Can stol change his gender in Poland and call itself stola?
pawian 197 | 19,921
22 Jun 2021 #136
Why don't you Poles switch to English as the official language

Why don`t you emigrant switch to a forum where asking such questions won`t be considered utter lunacy? :):):)
mafketis 35 | 11,212
22 Jun 2021 #137
I am sure that there is an explanation for this insanity.

The same reason that you can't say 'three furnitures' or 'he cans sing well'.... languages have their own logic, but narcissists can't deal with anything foreign - it frightens and frustrates them to not be in control...
Novichok 3 | 6,786
22 Jun 2021 #138
but narcissists can't deal with anything foreign

If you mean me, I did deal with everything foreign more and better than you or anyone you know. Name one person who one sunny day left everybody behind, got on a train, and just left the country with no one waiting at the other end. No destination address, no job, and no money. You can't so why don't you drop the narcissist crap.

It's old.

languages have their own logic,

Logic and Polish language should never be used in the same sentence. There is a reason why English is everywhere and Polish nowhere. Even here, it's a me-too language.
Lyzko 37 | 8,557
22 Jun 2021 #139
Not only possible, Pawian, but the only choice in US vernacular!
Colorado Cook
11 Jul 2021 #140
@cecie
Oh yenna cohani just means "oh my dear"

Does anyone know what this expression means: Yak tam stare crioo? Is it "How the old whine?
pawian 197 | 19,921
12 Jul 2021 #141
Yak tam stare crioo?

How do you pronounce that crioo???
Oathbreaker 4 | 474
12 Jul 2021 #142
@pawian
My best guess: " Jak tam stara krowo"
Highly improper tho
pawian 197 | 19,921
12 Jul 2021 #143
Krowo? hahahaha

Yes, highly improper.
Do widzenia, Ślepa Gienia!
Oathbreaker 4 | 474
12 Jul 2021 #144
A co to Gienia?
No bo "ślepota" to ja znam
pawian 197 | 19,921
12 Jul 2021 #145
Gienia is a diminutive of Genowefa.
Polvisitor
3 Sep 2021 #146
My Babcia used to say, Ty glida, to any of us who wouldn't do as we were told. Anyone know what that means?
mafketis 35 | 11,212
3 Sep 2021 #147
Ty glid

maybe 'ty gnida' (or 'ty gnido' not much difference)

ty - you (Familiar)

literally, 'gnida' means 'nit' (egg stage of head lice)

but it's also a pretty strong insult, here defined as "scheming, two-faced malicious person"

The minister of education recently tried to get a university professor fired for calling a member of parliament 'gnida' in a (later deleted) tweet.
Alien 12 | 2,216
3 Sep 2021 #148
No grandma calls her grandchildren nits (gnidy). Never ever.
mafketis 35 | 11,212
3 Sep 2021 #149
Then what do you think it could have been?

One problem is no pronunciation is given (especially for -i- is the -i- in machine or the -i- in bite?

The only thing that comes to my mind could maybe be something based on German kleine (if 'glida' rhymes with Ida (english pronuncation)

Googling also turns up glajda an old poznanian word meaning 'mud' or 'messy woman/girl'...

Any ideas?
Alien 12 | 2,216
3 Sep 2021 #150
Ty glizdo; you little worm.


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