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Game - guess Polish idioms/sayings in direct English translation


Feniks 1 | 249
27 May 2024 #1,681
A new one:

'Like aunt in Czechia' - what does it mean?
jon357 75 | 22,608
27 May 2024 #1,682
I've an idea that it's about wandering over the Czech border by mistake, getting lost. That happened to me once.

And I've heard something similar used in Warsaw ironically about women making a discreet visit to a clinic.
Feniks 1 | 249
28 May 2024 #1,683
I've an idea that it's about wandering over the Czech border by mistake, getting lost.

You're right, it means that someone got completely lost. Apparently, the origins of the idiom are unknown but I think it stands to reason that somewhere down the line someone wandered over that border.....
Lenka 5 | 3,504
28 May 2024 #1,684
Wow, interesting. Didn't know that even though I live close to the border. Great riddle!
Feniks 1 | 249
29 May 2024 #1,685
Didn't know that even though I live close to the border.

That's probably a first then! I just presume the Polish members will know all the riddles.

Onto the next one and this is easy:

What is meant by 'hands are dropping'?
mafketis 37 | 10,916
29 May 2024 #1,686
What is meant by 'hands are dropping'?

IME it means someone has said something so unrealistic that there's no answering it.... (closest in English might be 'to throw one's hand's up/in the air')
OP pawian 223 | 24,560
30 May 2024 #1,687
'Like aunt in Czechia

Sth completely unknown to me. :):)

But close in meaning to another Czech expression in Polish - Czech film is the one whose plot makes viewers acquire the feeling of being lost. :):):
Feniks 1 | 249
30 May 2024 #1,688
it means someone has said something so unrealistic that there's no answering it..

It's almost right but your English definition is spot on. It means 'I give up'. Feeling hopeless and despairing or conveying disbelief and resignation at the same time.
Lenka 5 | 3,504
30 May 2024 #1,689
To me the word 'exasperation' comes to mind
OP pawian 223 | 24,560
9 Jun 2024 #1,690
What is to give the leg ?
Alien 20 | 5,207
9 Jun 2024 #1,691
to give the leg

wash off/zmyć się
OP pawian 223 | 24,560
9 Jun 2024 #1,692
And in proper English used by intellectuals???
mafketis 37 | 10,916
9 Jun 2024 #1,693
to flee, to run away I like the British expression 'to do a runner' though I probably wouldn't use it.....
jon357 75 | 22,608
9 Jun 2024 #1,694
to do a runner'

Also "to leg it" and "to nash".
mafketis 37 | 10,916
9 Jun 2024 #1,695
Yeah... don't like those.... I kind of like 'do a Houdini' but it's a bit dated....

A novel I read set in Ireland with some traveler characters the term 'crush' was used which I like a lot, but I don't know how widely that's used.....
Korvinus 3 | 557
9 Jun 2024 #1,696
This reminds me of cuckold simulator

ng
jon357 75 | 22,608
9 Jun 2024 #1,697
'crush

I've not heard it but would probably understand it in context without thinking.

I'd probably say leg it, though nash was popular a few years ago. Some people say scarper which is a bit classier. Do a runner started as London slang but has become more widely acceptable since boomers picked it up from the TV. It wouldn't offend or sound coarse. Leg it sounds cruder nd nash sounds like drug dealer talk..

Aussies say "to shoot through".
OP pawian 223 | 24,560
9 Jun 2024 #1,698
to flee, to run away

Yes!

What about to go in the long one???
jon357 75 | 22,608
9 Jun 2024 #1,699
to go in the long one???

Much the same, isn't it?

Run away, escape, go out quickly or for a short while.
OP pawian 223 | 24,560
2 days ago #1,700
Run away, escape,

Exactly!

What about :it doesn`t overflow to sb.
Feniks 1 | 249
2 days ago #1,701
it doesn`t overflow to sb.

Keeping quiet about something?
gumishu 15 | 6,272
2 days ago #1,702
jemu/jej/im(etc) się nie przelewa (sorry for spoiling your fun, pawian :P)
OP pawian 223 | 24,560
2 days ago #1,703
Keeping quiet

Sorry, no.

przelewa

You should provide an answer in English.

spoiling your fun

?????
Feniks 1 | 249
1 day ago #1,704
Someone's not doing too well?
OP pawian 223 | 24,560
1 day ago #1,705
not doing too well

Yes, but provide the context which is quite narrow here.
Feniks 1 | 249
1 day ago #1,706
Someone is just getting by, lacking the means to survive? To have nothing in reserve?
gumishu 15 | 6,272
1 day ago #1,707
Someone is just getting by

I would go with this one, yes
OP pawian 223 | 24,560
1 day ago #1,708
lacking the means to survive?

Yes, the context is strictly financial.

Can you guess the origin of this idiom?
jon357 75 | 22,608
1 day ago #1,709
Can you guess the origin of this idiom?

His cup doesn't runneth over, his crock of gold isn't overflowing with money, his wallet's not brimming with cash.

Understandable in English.
OP pawian 223 | 24,560
1 day ago #1,710
his crock of gold isn't overflowing with money

I will accept it as close and eventually correct although in my opinion it takes its origin from eating or drinking. When you exaggerate with consumption coz you are so rich and can easily afford it, food or liquid overflows from your mouth.


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