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I have Jewish DNA, but only know of Polish ancestry .


chessy    
5 May 2012  #1
Hello, I did a DNA test that reveals Askenazic Jewish DNA, but I alway thought I was Polish American. My Polish Family comes from Suwalki area. These are names in family tree Waszkiewicz, Alboszta, Turkiewicz, Fillpowicz and Pawlowske. Are any of these names Jewish? Also, did Jews and Catholics ever intermarry over a 100 years ago?

Thanks, E. Sinykin
Bieganski 17 | 907    
5 May 2012  #2
If you believe your DNA results are accurate then I'd say you answered your own questions.
pip 11 | 1,660    
5 May 2012  #3
just out of curiosity--where did you get this test done. I am interested in doing this also.
Gruffi_Gummi - | 106    
5 May 2012  #4
Also, did Jews and Catholics ever intermarry over a 100 years ago?

Intermarriage was uncommon (for religious reasons - non-Catholics could not marry within the Catholic faith, and, of course, interfaith marriages are even now an absolute no-no for religious Jews), but it wasn't necessary for mixing the DNA. :)
Hybrid_Tech    
5 May 2012  #5
Could you please be more specific about your DNA results? What was is it exactly about your DNA results that determined you had Ashkenazic ancestry? Was this a test based on Y-DNA or mitochondrial?
pawian 126 | 6,546    
6 May 2012  #6
I did a DNA test that reveals Askenazic Jewish DNA, but I alway thought I was Polish American.

Errare humanum est.

Take it easy.
jon357 65 | 13,406    
6 May 2012  #7
but it wasn't necessary for mixing the DNA. :)

Exactly ;-)

Though as well as just hanky panky, there were also thousands of families who converted over the years.

I did a DNA test that reveals Askenazic Jewish DNA, but I alway thought I was Polish American.

Swings and roundabouts - you shatter an illusion but gain an Israeli passport.
yehudi 1 | 434    
6 May 2012  #8
Waszkiewicz, Alboszta, Turkiewicz, Fillpowicz and Pawlowske

Not one name sounds Jewish to me. Your Jewish ancestors, if there were any, probably converted and then changed their names to keep you from finding out about your roots.
Nickidewbear 20 | 550    
10 Jul 2012  #9
Hello, I did a DNA test that reveals Askenazic Jewish DNA, but I alway thought I was Polish American. My Polish Family comes from Suwalki area. These are names in family tree Waszkiewicz, Alboszta, Turkiewicz, Fillpowicz and Pawlowske. Are any of these names Jewish? Also, did Jews and Catholics ever intermarry over a 100 years ago?
Thanks, E. Sinykin

Your story is similar to mine. The Andrulewiczes (Andruleviches), Morgiewiczes (Margiewiczes), Daniłowiczes, and Chernetskis were and are Jews. The Chernetskis from a farm in Lipsk nad Biebrzą married into the Daniłowicz family from Krasne when "Antoni" (real name unknown) Chernetski married "Katarzyna" Daniłowicz (real name unknown). Aleksjondria Andrulewicz Chernetski, when she married "Antoni"'s and "Katarzyna"'s son Julian, concocted the names for both sets of parents (that is, "Antoni Czarniecki" and "Antoni" Andrulewicz, and "Katarzyna Margiewicz" and "Katarzyna" Daniłowicz). She concocted these for at least their (that is, her and Julian's) respective death certificates and because they converted to Catholicism. Whether Aleksjondria and Julian were also concocted because of their conversion, I do not know. However, she also certainly concocted "Antoni" (Anthony) for my great-granddad born in Cumań, Wołyń on October 23 or 24, 1904--Saint Anthony Mary Claret has his feast day on October 24, and she was smart and perhaps even literate enough at the time to know about him. Besides, her cousin Vil'gel'm Andrulevich was able to vote.

They converted to Catholicism and were swiftly kicked off of the family farm in Lipsk. Living as Crypto-Jewish Catholics in America, they established a new life. So, to answer your question, it had less to do with (if any) intermarriage and more about Crypto Judaism.
gjene 13 | 194    
12 Jul 2012  #10
Here is another theory that might be more plausible then marriage. Could be that one of your ancestors could have been an orphan Jew and was adopted out of sympathy because of one of the many wars that happened over the centuries. Maybe or maybe not, but it is something else to consider if there might not have been any known immediate family. of the orphan.
Magdalena 3 | 1,837    
13 Jul 2012  #11
The Andrulewiczes (Andruleviches), Morgiewiczes (Margiewiczes), Daniłowiczes, and Chernetskis were and are Jews.

I still don't know how you came to the conclusion. I'm not saying they aren't, I have read your story here on PF, and I cannot find a logical link between the fact that your family comes from Poland and the fact that they are (all!) Jewish. Have you seen any documents to prove this? Like baptismal certificates or documents showing their previous, Jewish identities or origin?

They converted to Catholicism and were swiftly kicked off of the family farm in Lipsk.

Why would they be kicked off their farm once they became Catholic? Doesn't make sense, unless, it was other (unconverted) family members who kicked them out... Who did that? I'm just curious, because your story is quite interesting and detailed in some places, but in other places I cannot logically piece the info together.
ZIMMY 7 | 1,607    
13 Jul 2012  #12
II have Jewish DNA, but only know of Polish ancestry .

Have you found yourself involuntarily eating kosher food? :)
Nickidewbear 20 | 550    
13 Jul 2012  #13
Why would they be kicked off their farm once they became Catholic? Doesn't make sense, unless, it was other (unconverted) family members who kicked them out... Who did that? I'm just curious, because your story is quite interesting and detailed in some places, but in other places I cannot logically piece the info together.

Who else would kick them off? And anyway, that's not the point of this thread.
yehudi 1 | 434    
15 Jul 2012  #14
They converted to Catholicism and were swiftly kicked off of the family farm in Lipsk. Living as Crypto-Jewish Catholics in America, they established a new life. So, to answer your question, it had less to do with (if any) intermarriage and more about Crypto Judaism.

When you say "crypto-jewish catholics" do you mean they posed as catholics but were really Jews or that they posed as jews but were really catholics? This was in America? Sounds odd. In America I think it's not dangerous to be either a catholic or a jew.
delphiandomine 86 | 16,396    
15 Jul 2012  #15
Sounds odd.

I'm surely not the only one who thinks that her entire story seems to be completely made up, right?
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,586    
15 Jul 2012  #16
bit harsh DD, seems to be someone desperately seeking some identity and grasping at vague stories and making a history out of them.
I think it's an American thing.
One thing for sure, Jewish DNA is not enough to make aaliyah.
yehudi 1 | 434    
15 Jul 2012  #17
Have you found yourself involuntarily eating kosher food? :)

I find myself doing that every morning. Can't stop.
ZIMMY 7 | 1,607    
15 Jul 2012  #18
ZIMMY: Have you found yourself involuntarily eating kosher food? :)
I find myself doing that every morning. Can't stop.

This morning my breakfast consisted of coffee, a cigar, and Lindt Chocolates. I blessed these God given treats myself.
Nickidewbear 20 | 550    
15 Jul 2012  #19
When you say "crypto-jewish catholics" do you mean they posed as catholics but were really Jews or that they posed as jews but were really catholics? This was in America? Sounds odd. In America I think it's not dangerous to be either a catholic or a jew.

It was back then. And they were Jews who posed as Catholics. And I did not make any of this up.
yehudi 1 | 434    
15 Jul 2012  #20
First they were kicked off the farm in poland by their jewish relatives. Then they went to America and continued to pretend they were catholics, even though this was not the dominant religion in America at any time, and even though they didn't believe in it. They really picked a difficult solution. I wonder why they didn't simply move to a Jewish neighborhood and revert to their Jewishness. No wonder you have identification issues. Good luck. I hope you work it out to your satisfaction.
Nickidewbear 20 | 550    
15 Jul 2012  #21
Thanks. They figured that being Catholic in an Anti-Semitic and Anti-Catholic America was (if you will) what would bring them less evil or tsores. They brought nothing from and sent nothing back to Poland. As Granduncle Tony stated:

I never seen nor did anyone mention anything special brought from Poland. A friend from Sugar Notch, Mrs. Bertha Wawrzyn, visited Poland every few years to see her family and would visit the family while there. All she ever brought back were photos that she took of the Polish Czarnecki's (see earlier comments).

Note how "[t]his DID NOT happen in our family" and "[t]here was not very much correspondence with the Polish family. Only an infrequent letter." Also note "All she ever brought back were photos that she took of the Polish Czarnecki's". They didn't mind the Wawrzyns, Catholics in of themselves; but Anusim like my family were better off considered dead as the meshumadim that they were.
Andrew5    
28 Feb 2013  #22
This is very similar to what I found out recently. I got a DNA test and it shows my Y DNA matches are all Jewish. But I only know of Ukrainian and Polish ancestry. My last name is Mac but derives from the Ukrainian Matz ("Мац"). My father left the Ukrainian- Polish region as a young boy right after World War Two. His family (father, uncles and brothers) died during the war and we always suspected there maybe some Jewish roots as our last name can obviously be Jewish, but this was mere speculation until my DNA tests. A couple years ago I went to my father's native village and records show that the Matz male line was baptized Catholic for almost two centuries. Yet my Y DNA results indicates that I likely had a Jewish great-grandfather within 4 generations. Can anyone help resolve this mystery ?
Nickidewbear 20 | 550    
28 Feb 2013  #23
My post above may help you.
Nacjonalista 4 | 98    
28 Feb 2013  #24
Where can you have this test done?
Nickidewbear 20 | 550    
28 Feb 2013  #25
Don't do it on Ancestry. Try 23andMe or FamilyTree DNA.
TommyG 2 | 368    
28 Feb 2013  #26
I'm not being a sceptic... but can DNA show whether someone is an atheist, Muslim, Hindu, Sikh, Catholic, Mormon, Protestant, Pagan or does is just work for worshippers of Judaism?

Or did a 'Jewish' gene develop out of nowhere.... ? Just interested to know...
jasondmzk    
28 Feb 2013  #27
To demonstrate Jewish ancestry, two elements are necessary:
 A robust comparative database of known Jews complete enough to be considered representative
of all members of that Jewish group, that is,
Ashkenazi, Sephardi or Mizrachi.

Excerpted from familytreedna.
Nacjonalista 4 | 98    
28 Feb 2013  #28
Jews are a race not just a religion.
Nickidewbear 20 | 550    
28 Feb 2013  #29
Amein.
jasondmzk    
28 Feb 2013  #30
For more on this, here's an old thread of mine, from just over a year ago:

polishforums.com/off-topic-lounge-47/guys-aware-judaism-religion-not-race-right-56588/





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