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Game - guess Polish idioms/sayings in direct English translation


jon357 74 | 22,395
30 Apr 2024 #1,651
Is it a high-wheeled carriage?

Something fixed to something. Can sort of resemble a spider. A clue is that the term originates in a very non-standard form of Polish that has its own name for things. Including another name for a door peeohole, not Judas...

Hmmmmm

collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/judas-hole
Feniks - | 221
2 May 2024 #1,652
How did the idiom come into being ????

I have no idea.

A clue is that the term originates in a very non-standard form of Polish that has its own name for things.

I have no idea about this either. I thought maybe you meant Lechitic languages but I don't think you do. Still can't get the 'spider' either.
OP pawian 223 | 24,583
2 May 2024 #1,653
I have no idea.

That`s what a proud and courageous Brit says! With such people like you Churchill defeated Nazis (in alliance with Poles and Ams, of course). You are a guessing role model for other posters. :):):)

Coz you are such, I will tell you that it came into being in 1960s when youngsters started playing big beat on their electric guitars. Before the rehearsal or actual concert, they had to connect their instruments to amplifiers. And then they checked on each other if everything was well connected.

Your guitar plays??
Yes, everything`s OK!!
Good!

jon357 74 | 22,395
2 May 2024 #1,654
Lechitic languages but I don't think you do

No. A way of speaking used by a very specific group of people, all of them with chequered histories.

Think of a spider's web made of metal.

Poles and Ams

People always forget the Canadians and Indians.
Feniks - | 221
3 May 2024 #1,655
And then they checked on each other if everything was well connected.

OK, thanks for the explanation.

A way of speaking used by a very specific group of people, all of them with chequered histories.

Prison slang?
Feniks - | 221
3 May 2024 #1,657
Think of a spider's web made of metal.

A wheel? I keep thinking this is some kind of transport.
jon357 74 | 22,395
3 May 2024 #1,658
Poles and Ams

Grypsera?

Yes! Though more often nowadays it's just called gryps. At least it is in Warsaw; the language (and even the name for the language) varies from place to place.

wheel

Something fixed and immobile.

Edit. It's a metal grill fixed on the outside of a cell window.
mafketis 37 | 10,852
3 May 2024 #1,659
Though more often nowadays it's just called gryps.

I first heard it called 'gryps' (in a very non-Warsaw part of Poland) long before I knew the name 'grypsera'.... so that's not new at all.

One online dictionary gives 'złodziej strychowy' for 'pająk' though I'm not sure what that is... maybe a cat burglar?

There was an early 90s movie with a gymnast who became a cat burglar (for a good cause) called 'pajęczarki' so....
OP pawian 223 | 24,583
4 May 2024 #1,660
I first heard it called 'gryps' (in a very non-Warsaw part of Poland) long before I knew the name 'grypsera'.

Gryps is a secret message on a little piece of paper that an inmate sends out of prison, usually through a mate who leaves.

Grypsera is the jargon of inmates. E.g,, what is anchor in inmates` language??
jon357 74 | 22,395
4 May 2024 #1,661
maybe a cat burglar?

Sort of. More people who burgle the top floor flat in apartment buildings. The reason some top floor flats have a pająk over the window.

a secret message on a little piece of paper

It can be, however the language is usually called gryps rather than grypsera by insiders nowadays. A very fast evolving language and with distinct variants from prison to prison.
mafketis 37 | 10,852
4 May 2024 #1,662
Gryps is a secret message on a little piece of paper

When I heard it the person (not a prisoner but someone who was visiting for work reasons) referred to some words they had learned as 'gryps'... I've heard similar usage over the years....
Feniks - | 221
4 May 2024 #1,663
It's a metal grill fixed on the outside of a cell window.

I'd never have got that one!

The reason some top floor flats have a pająk over the window.

Not just confined to cells then.
jon357 74 | 22,395
4 May 2024 #1,664
Not just confined to cells then.

A big thing in Polish cities where people don't generally have contents insurance.

Another gryps word is "Cadillac" (a single bed in a cell), and one of the better known ones is "kosa"; can you guess what it means?

Sometimes prisoners say "nie zarzucać, idę na krótko" or "nie zarzucać, idę na ostro". When do they say this?
Feniks - | 221
4 May 2024 #1,665
kosa"

Knife?

When do they say this?

Does this have anything to do with eating?
jon357 74 | 22,395
4 May 2024 #1,666
Knife?

Yes.

Does this have anything to do with eating?

Yes. Zarzucać is about eating.

They aren't the most delicate of sentences.
Feniks - | 221
5 May 2024 #1,667
Another easy one.

To hold two magpies by the tail. What does it mean?
gumishu 15 | 6,186
6 May 2024 #1,668
To hold two magpies by the tail.

I'm far from being an expert, but shouldn't that read: "To catch(grab?) two magpies by one tail"
mafketis 37 | 10,852
6 May 2024 #1,669
hold two magpies by the tail. What does it mean?

two birds, one stone....
Feniks - | 221
7 May 2024 #1,670
shouldn't that read: "To catch(grab?) two magpies by one tail"

In Polish the idiom is: trzymać dwie sroki za ogon

I think the translation is correct? I think there are other versions of this idiom though.

two birds, one stone.

Yep :) Or to deal with several matters at the same time.
gumishu 15 | 6,186
7 May 2024 #1,671
trzymać dwie sroki za ogon

well, maybe you know something that I do not, but I never encountered it in this form, but rather this form: "Złapać dwie sroki za jeden ogon"
OP pawian 223 | 24,583
7 May 2024 #1,672
but I never encountered it in this form,

Catch or hold, both are correct.

pl.wiktionary.org/wiki/trzyma%C4%87_dwie_sroki_za_ogon
Feniks - | 221
14 May 2024 #1,673
Another easy one.

' Where dogs bark with their asses' - what does it mean?
Alien 21 | 5,197
16 May 2024 #1,674
Where dogs bark with their asses

This doesn't mean anything to me.
Feniks - | 221
16 May 2024 #1,675
That does surprise me unless it's not commonly used these days.

In Polish:

'Tam gdzie psy dupami szczekają'

If no-one else has a go I'll post the meaning.
gumishu 15 | 6,186
16 May 2024 #1,676
'Tam gdzie psy dupami szczekają'

it means more or less the same thing as "Tam gdzie diabeł mówi dobranoc" (Where the devil says good night")
jon357 74 | 22,395
17 May 2024 #1,677
diabeł mówi dobranoc

Where the crows don't fly...
Feniks - | 221
20 May 2024 #1,678
it means more or less the same thing as "Tam gdzie diabeł mówi dobranoc" (

Correct! A remote backwater. Somewhere in the ass end of nowhere.
Lyzko 45 | 9,508
2 days ago #1,679
A similar expression exists in German, lit. "A place where the hares and the foxes bid each other a good night".
OP pawian 223 | 24,583
1 day ago #1,680
' Where dogs bark with their asses'

I see it has become trendy in the forum to exploit ass topics.... :):):):)

A famous Pole said once - it all starts with an ass and ends with it too. I don`t remember who said it without googling.


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