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Game - guess Polish idioms/sayings in direct English translation


gumishu 11 | 5,495
22 Jul 2020 #901
@pawian

ginger stepchild? - urbandictionary says beaten like a ginger stepchild means soundly beaten, utterly defeated.. but redheaded stepchild means someone mistreated, neglected or unwanted
Ziemowit 13 | 4,204
22 Jul 2020 #902
What's the point in googling the answer? Wouldn't it be more fun if participants tried to guess the meaning with no assistance from Uncle google?
OP pawian 175 | 13,563
22 Jul 2020 #903
but redheaded stepchild means someone mistreated, neglected or unwanted

That was maf`s intention.

Wouldn't it be more fun if participants tried to guess the meaning with no assistance from Uncle google?

Yes, it would but you have to wait for days for an answer and very often you get none. What fun is there in waiting endlessly?
mafketis 24 | 8,944
22 Jul 2020 #904
redheaded stepchild means someone mistreated, neglected or unwanted

Close, it's more like someone who isn't accepted by other members of a group they belong to (usually but not necessarily family). Harry Potter is treated like a redheaded stepchild by the muggle family he's living with at the beginning of the first book.

Mieli kiedyś pieniądze. (very regional - Southern US)
OP pawian 175 | 13,563
22 Jul 2020 #905
I have no idea. I only passed through Southern US in a sealed truck with a dozen of Mexicans so I had no chance to learn local idioms.
Lenka 3 | 2,231
22 Jul 2020 #906
to have hay in one's head

The American ones are pure mystery to me
OP pawian 175 | 13,563
22 Jul 2020 #907
Ha, the same as to have gudgeons (small fish) in the head. Or - more vulgar - to have shitt in one`s head. hahaha
gumishu 11 | 5,495
22 Jul 2020 #908
Mieli kiedyś pieniądze.

searching for money idioms I found this pun: I used to be a banker, but then I lost interest - heh a good one
OP pawian 175 | 13,563
22 Jul 2020 #909
I know, Morawiecki said it. hahahaha
mafketis 24 | 8,944
22 Jul 2020 #910
Okay, "they had money once" is a way of referring to people who are the opposite of nouveau riche, that is they don't have money now but they still have the manners and refined sensibilities of the upper classes (it's an especially beloved category of people in the traditional Old South - anyone can make money, but _class_ ....that's an accomplishment).
Lenka 3 | 2,231
22 Jul 2020 #911
"they had money once"

Aaa, old south pride after the war... The North could take their slaves but they couldn't take their pride... Thanks Maf, cool to learn that
Ziemowit 13 | 4,204
22 Jul 2020 #912
referring to people who are the opposite of nouveau riche

A very refined idiom, I'd say, and one which praises accomplishments in an intelligent and friendly way. This said, having read Lenka's opinion:

The North could take their slaves but they couldn't take their pride

I should add that pride doesn't go well with slavery (or does it)?

Actually, there is a Polish idiom describing a somewhat reverse situation to that shown in Maf's idiom.
OP pawian 175 | 13,563
22 Jul 2020 #913
I should add that pride doesn't go well with slavery (or does it)?

Yes, they used to beat those blacks.

A new one: sprzedać kogoś w dół rzeki.
mafketis 24 | 8,944
22 Jul 2020 #914
The North could take their slaves

Only a very small percentage of people (even of rich people) ever had slaves in the South. The non-slaving wealthy were just as likely to lose their money after the war (maybe more likely it's a complicated question).
OP pawian 175 | 13,563
22 Jul 2020 #915
Only a very small percentage of people (even of rich people) ever had slaves in the South.

Hmm, one third isn`t such a small percentage. :):) In two States, one half.

To avoid further discussion, read this site:

faculty.weber.edu/kmackay/selected_statistics_on_slavery_i.htm
Chemikiem 6 | 2,319
23 Jul 2020 #916
Wow, this thread has suddenly got busy :)

sprzedać kogoś w dół rzeki.

Sell someone down the river. To betray someone in some way, usually for personal gain.
The origins of this phrase lie in slavery.
mafketis 24 | 8,944
23 Jul 2020 #917
To avoid further discussion

There's a difference between families and households and individuals.... but enough of that.
Lenka 3 | 2,231
23 Jul 2020 #918
I should add that pride doesn't go well with slavery (or does it)?

Only a very small percentage of people (even of rich people) ever had slaves

I should explain that my comment was inspired by 'Gone with the wind' that I re read not long ago and which Maf's saying brought to life.

In the book it's described how Yankee women wanted to socialise with the old south families but of course are not permitted..

Since we are in the class division area:
'Hay sticking out of one's shoes'
Chemikiem 6 | 2,319
23 Jul 2020 #919
'Hay sticking out of one's shoes'

Someone who behaves in a primitive and crude manner? Does it apply to lower classes who might behave boorishly?
Lenka 3 | 2,231
23 Jul 2020 #920
No, it's someone who pretends to be all posh but in reality his lower class/rural nature shows.
When I use it I have a picture in my head of someone in super smart clothes with a bit of hay with dunk stuck to the sole of the shoe
mafketis 24 | 8,944
23 Jul 2020 #921
pretends to be all posh but in reality his lower class/rural nature shows

Since you mentioned GWTW it may interest you to know that one of Margaret Mitchell's working titles was "Mules in Horses' Harness" referencing Mammy's description of Rhett and Scarlett (with the same meaning as sticking out of one's shows)

Jak struga nie podnosi się...
OP pawian 175 | 13,563
23 Jul 2020 #922
The origins of this phrase lie in slavery.

Yes, of course.

How about: and you beat black people.

Jak struga nie podnosi się...

The squirt doesn`t increase. Hmm, I have no idea.
mafketis 24 | 8,944
23 Jul 2020 #923
The squirt

wrong meaning..... (I looked in google images and struga was the closes to my mental image)

and you beat Negroos.

The Polish version is so much softer than the Russian version (А у вас негров линчуют - And in your country they lynch Blacks!)
OP pawian 175 | 13,563
23 Jul 2020 #924
wrong meaning..... (I looked in google images and struga was the closes to my mental image)

Sorry, but struga isn`t creek. If you meant the creek don`t rise idiom

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_creek_don%27t_rise
an American slang expression implying strong intentions subject to complete frustration by uncommon but not unforeseeable events.

it should be strumień, potok, strumyk, rzeczka. Never mind. :)
mafketis 24 | 8,944
23 Jul 2020 #925
Sorry, but struga isn`t creek. If you meant the creek don`t rise idiom

the picture in the wikipedia entry for struga is far closer to what creeks look like where I'm from.... streams are to small and clear and potok is too... babbling...

pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Struga_(hydrologia)

The way my mother used to say if (she said it often) was "Good Lord willin' and the cricks don't rise" apart from that the word was rhymed with Greek....
OP pawian 175 | 13,563
23 Jul 2020 #926
the picture in the wikipedia entry for struga is far closer to what creeks look like where I'm from

aaah, I checked that entry and I know why we differ now! Struga is an official expression for streams, but it is seldom used in everyday language. :) Funny. Thanks, I have just learnt sth new.
OP pawian 175 | 13,563
27 Jul 2020 #927
I just read a Polish idiom I had never seen/heard before:
to keep your cards next to your medals.

Is it a copy from English?
Lenka 3 | 2,231
27 Jul 2020 #928
I had never seen/heard before:

Seriously? Wow! Very popular in my family
mafketis 24 | 8,944
27 Jul 2020 #929
Is it a copy from English?

Not quite, the English is to keep your cards close to your chest with no mention of medals there.... on google I also see 'vest' but have never heard that.... it might be British in which case I'm not sure what it refers to... probably not kamizelka... if Hyacinth Bucket can be believed it refers to a wifebeater t-shirt.
OP pawian 175 | 13,563
27 Jul 2020 #930
Seriously? Wow! Very popular in my family

Well, it means Poland is such a big country that, living in one part, I haven`t had a chance to get to know some phrases from other parts. :)

the English is to keep your cards close to your chest with no mention of medals there..

Yes, those medals are quite unnecessary here. It is obvious they are on one`s chest but still they complicate the message.

I just read another title with this:
soda rushes into sb`s head.


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