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Game - guess Polish idioms/sayings in direct English translation


Chemikiem 6 | 2,212
12 Jul 2020 #871
to horseradish sb.

To give someone a bollocking, to reprimand them?
OP pawian 171 | 12,080
12 Jul 2020 #872
Yes, very good. :)

Now, in direct translation it is: a roofer. Who or what?
Chemikiem 6 | 2,212
13 Jul 2020 #873
Not much idea about this presuming it's nothing to do with the job itself.
Someone with high aspirations? Someone who puts on airs and graces?
Lenka 3 | 1,999
13 Jul 2020 #874
Think cats :)
OP pawian 171 | 12,080
13 Jul 2020 #875
Yes.
Sorry, Chemikiem, it is about cats, mostly those independent ones (but not stray) which allegedly enjoy walking on roofs. Do Brits know that cats wander on roofs? I remember tens of pics of such cats, especially at night with the moon in the background, in my kid books.

I am not a roofer, I am a coucher/couch potato.



OP pawian 171 | 12,080
14 Jul 2020 #876
What abouit?:to not throw words onto the wind
Chemikiem 6 | 2,212
14 Jul 2020 #877
Sorry, Chemikiem, it is about cats,

I wouldn't have got that. When Lenka mentioned cats, I was thinking they might be chasing birds that perch on roofs.

Do Brits know that cats wander on roofs

Of course. They are putting their prey under surveillance, whilst at the same time risking their lives. Just as well they have nine :)

to not throw words onto the wind

To pay attention to what's being said? Don't say something unless you mean it?
OP pawian 171 | 12,080
14 Jul 2020 #878
Yes, correct guess.

They are putting their prey under surveillance,

Really? I had no idea about birds. I thought they climb onto roofs to meoaw to the moon.
Chemikiem 6 | 2,212
14 Jul 2020 #879
I think we are talking at cross purposes here. I didn't mean that cats are looking at birds necessarily as prey. They could be looking at anything from a position of height.

Or maybe they just like climbing.......
OP pawian 171 | 12,080
14 Jul 2020 #880
I think we are talking at cross purposes here.

hahaha Yes, indeed, a funny misunderstanding. I imagined you said cats go onto roofs to hunt for birds there.
Chemikiem 6 | 2,212
14 Jul 2020 #881
Every stick has two ends

The sycthe met the stone
OP pawian 171 | 12,080
16 Jul 2020 #882
Every stick means there are always two alternatives to a situation. good and bad.

The scythe (typo! haha) means one meets an unexpected resistance and has to withdraw.

Animals/pets are an important part of my life, so let`s focus on them for a while:

sb goes grouse
dolnoslask 5 | 2,878
16 Jul 2020 #883
Every stick means there are always two alternatives to a situation.

And with every stick with two ends , there is always a $hitty end, hence the saying getting the $hitty end of the stick.
OP pawian 171 | 12,080
18 Jul 2020 #884
to slice/chop sb
Chemikiem 6 | 2,212
20 Jul 2020 #885
Every stick means there are always two alternatives to a situation. good and bad.

Yes! Or two sides to every story.

The scythe (typo! haha) means one meets an unexpected resistance and has to withdraw.

How I understand it is that one has met one's match.

sb goes grouse

No idea! I thought it meant that somebody is complaining but this idiom is to do with the bird.......

to slice/chop sb

To cut someone down to size? To make someone realize they're not as smart as they think they are?
OP pawian 171 | 12,080
20 Jul 2020 #886
How I understand it is that one has met one's match.

Why not? Both are correct, meaning the same, only expressed differently - yours is more idiomatic, mine - descriptive. haha

to go grouse means to get really annoyed, like a male grouse.

to slice sb means to rip sb off. I just read about banks which are increasing service costs for clients.

Animals/pets are an important part of my life, so let`s focus on them for a while:

to have ostrich`s stomach/ like an ostrich
Chemikiem 6 | 2,212
21 Jul 2020 #887
yours is more idiomatic

In keeping with the thread :)
Thanks for the answers to the other idioms, I didn't do so well with those!

to have ostrich`s stomach/ like an ostrich

Someone who can eat anything with no ill effects? We would say that someone has a strong or cast iron stomach.
OP pawian 171 | 12,080
21 Jul 2020 #888
Thanks for the answers to the other idioms, I didn't do so well with those!

Come on, it is only a fun game, not a serious competition. Hey, you know Polish quite well. Why don`t you start a similar thread but reversed - English idioms in Polish translation. It could be fun, too.

someone has a strong or cast iron stomach.

Yes!

to climb up onto sb`s head
Chemikiem 6 | 2,212
22 Jul 2020 #889
Why don`t you start a similar thread but reversed - English idioms in Polish translation.

Your English is better than my Polish. I would end up up confusing everyone, and not everything translates well as you know. Add to that the fact that very few people bother with this thread as it is, I doubt a new one would be any different. Sad but true :(

to climb up onto sb`s head

To dominate and try to gain control over somebody?

it is only a fun game, not a serious competition

Of course! I can't win them all ;-)
mafketis 23 | 8,543
22 Jul 2020 #890
I'll start with an easy one (including a cultural substitution)

nb My cultural frame of reference is American.

Wypił oranżadę.
Ziemowit 13 | 4,038
22 Jul 2020 #891
Wypił oranżadę.

Experience the consequences of one's own actions?
mafketis 23 | 8,543
22 Jul 2020 #892
Experience the consequences of

that comes later, this is about the reason for drinking.
gumishu 11 | 5,326
22 Jul 2020 #893
drink one's cool aid?
mafketis 23 | 8,543
22 Jul 2020 #894
close, but what does it mean?
OP pawian 171 | 12,080
22 Jul 2020 #895
Wypił oranżadę.

I give up. Even googling didn`t help.

Or is it similar to Polish: drink the beer you have brewed - meaning you have to suffer consequences of your actions.
Ziemowit 13 | 4,038
22 Jul 2020 #896
meaning you have to suffer consequences of your actions

I said that before and he said "no". He said:

that comes later

One is preparing oneself for an action? Has decided to take a task on?
mafketis 23 | 8,543
22 Jul 2020 #897
I give up. Even googling didn`t help.

And I thought it would be too easy...

meaning you have to suffer consequences of your actions

Close, to drink the kool-aid means uncritically believe something in order to claim or maintain membership in a group with the strong implication that it will eventually do harm to the person. The drinking specifically refers to accepting the beliefs.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drinking_the_Kool-Aid

I'm pretty sure I've seen oranżada used as an equivalent in subtitles (variants of the phrase often occur in American scripts). I asked a friend once if he understood the reference and he had no idea....

Hopefully an easier one.... (the first google hits are references to the expression)

Kim jest rudy pasierb?
OP pawian 171 | 12,080
22 Jul 2020 #898
Drinking_the_Kool-Aid

hahaha It didn` t occur to me to look under kool aid, I was looking for orangeade/soda. I never saw Kool Aid in Poland, let alone trying it. I have a book with this word in the title but didn`t read it yet.

Kim jest rudy pasierb?

ha, that was easier - red headed stepchild. A child who is obviously not your own, Nie moje dziecko.
Lenka 3 | 1,999
22 Jul 2020 #899
red headed stepchild

In the Polish version I've heard it was 'rude znajda'
OP pawian 171 | 12,080
22 Jul 2020 #900
It must be a direct translation coz I have never heard it. Bękart seems popular, too.


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