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Game - guess Polish idioms/sayings in direct English translation


Lyzko 19 | 5,753    
13 Mar 2019  #151
How indicative of what nationalities think of or picture foreigners!
In German, there was an expression before the end of WWII, roughly translated as follows:

The teacher walks into a particularly noise classroom and roars, "HEY, WHAT DO YOU THINK THIS IS, A YESHIVA?" (Ruhe, hier ist keine
Judenschule!). The Polish idiom implies Jews are rootless without a homeland, the German expression implies that Jews are noisy.
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
14 Mar 2019  #152
ciemno jak w dupie u murzyna

Yes, I have known this first one since my elementary school, But the other is new to me, I have never heard it.
Chemikiem 5 | 1,323    
14 Mar 2019  #153
it means to deprive sb of their money/property, either legally or not

Ok, thanks for the explanation.

To wring a cat by its tail.

Does it mean to twist or turn everything around?
mafketis 17 | 6,510    
  14 Mar 2019  #154
Staying with the bovine theme, what about "to punch/strike a bull"? synonyms include to 'shoot a bull' or 'make a bull' but the first was more common in one google test I did while 'shoot a bull' was more common in another....

hint: nothing to do with the (US?) expression 'to shoot the bull'
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
14 Mar 2019  #155
It still means to make a mistake., doesn`t it?

Bovine themes continued: what about strike sb like a bull ?
Chemikiem 5 | 1,323    
15 Mar 2019  #156
"to punch/strike a bull"

To shoot a bull was done on page 2, posts 51 and 53, presume this is the same thing.

strike sb like a bull ?

I will have to ponder again, but was my answer in post 153 about the cat's tail correct or not?
mafketis 17 | 6,510    
15 Mar 2019  #157
To shoot a bull was done on page 2,

oops.... have 'Czech mistake' and 'Czech movie' (two very different things) been done?
Ziemowit 12 | 3,201    
15 Mar 2019  #158
The teacher walks into a particularly noise classroom and roars: Ruhe, hier ist keine Judenschule!

I heard a similar one in my grammar school once (quite a long time ago). It was almost exactly the same as you have described. The history teacher walked into a class and said:

Proszę o ciszę! Żydowski porządek panuje w waszej klasie!

The class burst into laughter as no one ever heard such a phrase, so one can safely say the expression had already been outdated. [The teacher was known was using expressions which sounded weird to the class as for example: Niech mnie dunder świśnie! And to this very day I don't know what dunder is!]
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
15 Mar 2019  #159
I will have to ponder again, but was my answer in post 153 about the cat's tail correct or not?

Oops, sorry, I was going to reply to it but sb had me distracted. Yes, it means twisting things to make people believe your version. Similar to "try to wriggle out of sth," if I am correct.

The Polish idiom implies Jews are rootless without a homeland, the German expression implies that Jews are noisy.

No, Łyżko, the Polish version is actually more favourable for Jews, it means they are always busy looking after their business, whether customers come or not.

have 'Czech mistake' and 'Czech movie' (two very different things) been done?

No. Czech movie is hard to understand while a Czech mistake is a silly one made during writing..
Dirk diggler 8 | 4,064    :-(
  15 Mar 2019  #160
strike sb like a bull ?

Never heard of that.. but beating a horse on the other hand... Walic konia...

Byk aka bull is sometimes used to connotate a mistake like on an exam
Chemikiem 5 | 1,323    
16 Mar 2019  #161
Czech movie

Give us a clue then Maf :)

strike sb like a bull

Does it mean to show someone no mercy?

Similar to "try to wriggle out of sth," if I am correct.

No. To try to wriggle out of sth means to avoid doing something you don't want to do. The best comparison I can think of for twisting things to make people believe your version, is to ' put a spin on something' - to twist sth to one's advantage, bending the truth, although this does often refer to events. Politicians are very adept at putting a spin on something ;)

A couple more:

Not all flour turns into bread
If you brew your own beer drink it yourself
mafketis 17 | 6,510    
  16 Mar 2019  #162
Give us a clue then Maf :)

If you've seen a bunch of Czech movies (and I lurve Czech movies) the Polish idiom makes no sense.... (French movie or Korean soap opera might be more apt in my particular case, though maybe not for you...)

If you brew your own beer drink it yourself

As you make your bed so must you lie in it...

Not all flour turns into bread

All that glitters....
Lyzko 19 | 5,753    
16 Mar 2019  #163
Nonetheless, pawian, the image of the money-hungry Jew continued to haunt them, don't you understand? Who does "business" for free?
:-)
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
  16 Mar 2019  #164
Does it mean to show someone no mercy?

Nope, it is much simpler as it means to hit sb with your head.

Not all flour turns into bread

Be prepared to experience failure in life.

Who does "business" for free?

I see.

And to this very day I don't know what dunder is!]

Very easy,. It is thunder. :) The same as niech Cię/mnie piorun strzeli/trzaśnie.
Chemikiem 5 | 1,323    
17 Mar 2019  #165
As you make your bed so must you lie in it...

Yes!

All that glitters...

Be prepared to experience failure in life.

I like the different ways that both of you have interpreted this :)

it means to hit sb with your head.

I was looking for sth not quite so obvious! The meaning of most English idioms is not apparent e.g 'he kicked the bucket' means 'he died'.

This is an easy one, but I like it :)

What does gingerbread have to do with a windmill?
mafketis 17 | 6,510    
17 Mar 2019  #166
What does that have to do with the price of tea in China?

like the different ways that both of you have interpreted this

stereotypes... there's a reason they exist!

And Czech movie?
Chemikiem 5 | 1,323    
17 Mar 2019  #167
What does that have to do with the price of tea in China?

Or, What does that have to do with the price of fish?, which is what I would say. Too easy!!

And Czech movie?

Oops sorry Maf, I forgot to reply, but I'm afraid it's too hard for me to understand :(
mafketis 17 | 6,510    
17 Mar 2019  #168
Are you being meta? Because czeski film refers to a situation that doesn't make any sense....
Ironside 47 | 9,328    
17 Mar 2019  #169
I like the different ways that both of you have interpreted this :)

Yet both of them are wrong. I can understand maf's confusion. It is funny that pawian doesn't get it either. It makes sense he is a Soviet hence his grasp on the Polish culture is erratic at best.

That saying refers to something that is incompatible/ something they will not bring expected result. An example: a couple doesn't get along - insert saying - meaning : they will not get married i.e. they will spilt.
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
17 Mar 2019  #170
hahaha you seem to be fascinated with Polish pop music of 1960s. But that song about a relationship which can`t come off is only one of possible usages of the saying. So, my version, though from a different perspective, is also correct. So, s m a f o y (you know what it means - stop making a .. etc) again. :):)

youtube.com/watch?v=eeKI8KcPgBA

To match each other like in a basket of poppy seed.
Ironside 47 | 9,328    
  17 Mar 2019  #171
with Polish pop music of 1960s

Not really. I'm familiar with Polish culture unlike you.

can`t come off is only one of possible usages of the saying. So, my version, though from a different perspective,

Is not. You're making it up as you go. Perspective my foot. Something is compatible and gonna work together or not. that is the meaning of that saying.

So, s m a f o y (you know what it means

No, I don't speak Soviet.
mafketis 17 | 6,510    
17 Mar 2019  #172
refers to something that is incompatible/ something they will not bring expected result

you could use 'all that glitters' in that context in the US (esp if it had been a love-at-first-sight kind of couple).
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
17 Mar 2019  #173
Not really. I'm familiar with Polish culture unlike you.

Who knows?

Guys, before I forget, delph gave me this concept: To call sb onto the rug/mat.
mafketis 17 | 6,510    
  17 Mar 2019  #174
Is it like 'call someone on the carpet' (is that not used in the UK)? I
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
17 Mar 2019  #175
Yes, exactly. But Polish version makes this carpet quite little - dywanik.
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
  18 Mar 2019  #176
Everybody healthy at home?

Yes, that`s a good one.

And from another barrel: To make big eyes (at sb)
Ironside 47 | 9,328    
19 Mar 2019  #177
you could use 'all that glitters' in that context in the US (esp if it had been a love-at-first-sight kind of couple).

Sure, but if we concentrate that saying to its bare essence its says such and such thingy won't work, won't produce an expected/hoped for result. Whereas in 'all that glitters' is about recognizing a true value of things/people.

Not the same.
Chemikiem 5 | 1,323    
19 Mar 2019  #178
its says such and such thingy won't work, won't produce an expected/hoped for result.

Ok, my interpretation of that idiom is that 'not all efforts produce a result' - not all flour will turn into bread, but some will. It depends on interpretation. I interpret 'all that glitters' as not everything on close inspection, is how it appears to be on the surface. So, loosely, it could be argued that there is a similarity in meaning, which is why I said I liked their definitions.

To match each other like in a basket of poppy seed.

To be like two peas in a pod?
Chemikiem 5 | 1,323    
1 day ago  #179
from another barrel: To make big eyes (at sb)

I'm presuming this is one idiom? Is it flirting with somebody a person finds attractive?
mafketis 17 | 6,510    
1 day ago  #180
No, that's what it would be in English, in Polish it expresses disbelief or amazement, something like 'staring with [one's] mouth [hanging] open'

In my experience it often seems to imply the person is playing dumb... (feigning surprise)


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