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Game - guess Polish idioms/sayings in direct English translation


Chemikiem 5 | 1,323    
  3 Mar 2019  #121
(do sth) till sh.itty death

I'm wondering if this is the same as the English expression ' to do something to death'. It means to overdo something to the extent that the 'something' becomes boring. E.g to play the same record or watch the same film over and over again.

I will have to ponder over the other idiom......
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
3 Mar 2019  #122
Yes, that vulgar addition (zasrany - perfectly known to Pol Ams, as I heard: Obama zasrana) strengthens the aspect of boredom and hopelesness.

In another thread there is a lot of guessing and instead of saying closer closer, Poles say warm, warmer... even more warmer. :):)
Chemikiem 5 | 1,323    
3 Mar 2019  #123
The English also say getting warmer in relation to the guesses getting closer and closer to the answer :) But, I feel I am so close and yet so far away..
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
3 Mar 2019  #124
The English also say getting warmer

Really? I thought it was typically Polish.
Chemikiem 5 | 1,323    
4 Mar 2019  #125
Really?

englishidiomsblog.blogspot.com/2011/06/getting-warmer.html

equal boy/man/chap/guy

I can only think of ' all men are created equal ', but not sure I'm right.
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
  4 Mar 2019  #126
Hey, when I asked Really, it didn`t mean I disbelieved you. I was just surprised. :)

Equal guy is the same as a cool guy. A bit outmoded today, youngsters prefer cool and the like.

This one sounds nice, though also outdated, still used here and there:

To wrap pasta/macaroni on ears.
mafketis 17 | 6,510    
5 Mar 2019  #127
Equal guy is the same as a cool guy.

równy gość?

FWIW most guys that would qualify as 'równy gość' in Polish wouldn't necessarily be 'cool guy' in (American) English
Dirk diggler 8 | 4,064    :-(
5 Mar 2019  #128
Rowny gosc means a straight up dude, also implies kindness or generosity.
Lyzko 19 | 5,753    
5 Mar 2019  #129
Recall once hearing the expression "dobry gosc", meaning "a good egg" aka "good guy".
mafketis 17 | 6,510    
5 Mar 2019  #130
"dobry gosc"

sounds like a loan translation from English 'good guy'.... not very Polish sounding (to me, could be wrong of course)
Lyzko 19 | 5,753    
6 Mar 2019  #131
Probably right, Maf.
Chemikiem 5 | 1,323    
6 Mar 2019  #132
To wrap pasta/macaroni on ears.

I'm not listening? To fall on deaf ears?
Or to tell a tall story? ( one that is implausible or far-fetched? )
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
  7 Mar 2019  #134
FWIW most guys that would qualify as 'równy gość' in Polish wouldn't necessarily be 'cool guy' in (American) English

Yes, but only if you think of position No 7 in urban dictionary. While I meant position No 1.

Or to tell a tall story? ( one that is implausible or far-fetched? )

Yes, exactly.

Sth outdated :): who did you mean by gorilla 2,3 decades ago?
Chemikiem 5 | 1,323    
7 Mar 2019  #135
Not sure if this is an idiom or factual question? Mighty Joe Young?
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
8 Mar 2019  #136
It is a factual question about an idiomatic expression. Who was called a gorrilla in the past? A hint - it always referred to males.
mafketis 17 | 6,510    
9 Mar 2019  #137
Who was called a gorrilla in the past? A hint - it always referred to males.

Bodyguard goon types?
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
9 Mar 2019  #138
Perfect! I was always amused when I heard it as a boy.

Again, forum activity made me think of this one: to take it on the chest (chestie)
Chemikiem 5 | 1,323    
10 Mar 2019  #139
I think that this is the equivalent of the English 'to take it on the chin'. It means to take an unpleasant or difficult situation without complaining and making a fuss. In other words, don't be a snowflake :)
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
10 Mar 2019  #140
Yes, exactly. But it sounds a bit chauvinistic (especially with the original ending: like a man which is mostly skipped today), I suppose females should say: take it on the breast. :):)

How about: make sb go with bags.
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
  11 Mar 2019  #141
Before I forget, this one just came to my mind while having a funny exchange: A horse would laugh at that.
Ziemowit 12 | 3,201    
11 Mar 2019  #142
How about: make sb go with bags.

Wouldn't it sound better as 'Let sb go with bags'?

A horse would laugh at that.

What about: they know each other like bald horses.
Chemikiem 5 | 1,323    
12 Mar 2019  #143
make sb go with bags.

I am still in pondering mode...........

A horse would laugh at that.

Laughing at something so absurd that it doesn't make any sense?

they know each other like bald horses.

Been there, done that in post # 31 :)
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
12 Mar 2019  #144
Wouldn't it sound better as 'Let sb go with bags'?

No, I thought about it, too, make is better as it implies forcing sb to do sth, most often against their will. Letting is too mild.

Laughing at something so absurd that it doesn't make any sense?

Yes!
Chemikiem 5 | 1,323    
12 Mar 2019  #145
make is better as it implies forcing sb to do sth, most often against their will

Is this the equivalent of the English phrase, cutting out the dead wood, e.g getting rid of someone who is no longer useful and has served their purpose? In this case along with their baggage?
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
  12 Mar 2019  #146
I will show mercy with this one: it means to deprive sb of their money/property, either legally or not. Bags mean you have to leave the place which you owned/run business at etc. :)

Today I used it a few times on students who couldn`t read sth properly:
It is written like an oxen.
mafketis 17 | 6,510    
  13 Mar 2019  #147
It's written clear as day..... right here in black and white... big as life

nb oxen is plural, singular ox
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
  13 Mar 2019  #148
Yes, very good, and thanks for correction. I really need to sleep more. Fekking fora.........

Next:
To wring a cat by its tail.
Lyzko 19 | 5,753    
13 Mar 2019  #149
We also say here in the States "plain as day" (jasno = literally, "clear").
:-)
Dirk diggler 8 | 4,064    :-(
  13 Mar 2019  #150
Two of my favorites off the top of my head: ciemno jak w dupie u murzyna (dark as black man's ass) also 'krecisz sie jak zyd w pustym sklepie' (you're roaming/wandering like a jew in an empty store)

Some Poles will refer to low quality items or improvisations or shortcut as being Russian - ruskie, Ruska, po rusku etc.


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