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Game - guess Polish idioms/sayings in direct English translation


mafketis 17 | 6,510    
  20 Feb 2019  #61
"Did you fall from a Christmas tree"

An American version might be "Did you just fall off the turnip truck?" or more generally "Were you born yesterday?" (though both of those are usually used negatively "I didn't just fall off the turnip truck" or "I wasn't born yesterday".

What about "Mustard after dinner"?
Chemikiem 5 | 1,323    
20 Feb 2019  #62
Here the penguin`s beak is bending

Now I do know this one. If I gave you the middle finger you would know what I mean. I first encountered this working in France where it's called Bras d'honneur.

"I wasn't born yesterday".

Yep, that's about right. Haven't heard that expression for years though!

Mustard after dinner?

I always thought it meant too late to be of any use as mustard's always served with the meat.
mafketis 17 | 6,510    
20 Feb 2019  #63
Yep, or as my mother used to say "a day late and a dollar short"... (or closing the barn door after the horse has gotten out)
Lyzko 19 | 5,753    
20 Feb 2019  #64
Mine too, Maf! Actually, as my own mother worked for an unusually miserly soul before striking out on her own, she preferred instead "a day late and fifty cents short"LOL
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
20 Feb 2019  #65
Now, two about fingers.

Two more about fingers:

To lick one`s fingers

To refuse to bend a finger

Rich Mazur 5 | 2,304    
20 Feb 2019  #66
and He gave me a finger
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
20 Feb 2019  #67
That`s not a Polish idiom, I am afraid.

If you want to make it Polish, you should complete it with a few more words.
Or change give into show.
mafketis 17 | 6,510    
21 Feb 2019  #68
not a Polish idiom, I am afraid

how would rich know any Polish idioms? he didn't know mortadella or that hitchiking was common in the PRL...
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
21 Feb 2019  #69
No, he was only yanking out chains. :):)
Chemikiem 5 | 1,323    
22 Feb 2019  #70
To lick one`s fingers

Would this mean to eagerly anticipate something, as in licking one's lips?

To refuse to bend a finger

I don't know if it's the same but in the UK we have a saying ' to not give/budge an inch', which means that a person is not changing their opinion on something, their mind is made up.

yanking out chains. :):)

FYI, an American term, not really used in the UK :)
Ironside 47 | 9,328    
22 Feb 2019  #71
I don't know if it's the same

Nope, 'refuse to do anything'.

to eagerly anticipate something,

to indicate how delicious it was as referred to food, drink, snack anything eatable really.
Chemikiem 5 | 1,323    
22 Feb 2019  #72
Nope, 'refuse to do anything'

That strikes me as having virtually the same meaning then. If a person is not going to budge an inch, then they're not going to do anything on the grounds that their mind is made up. How does it differ?

to indicate how delicious it was as referred to food, drink, snack anything eatable really.

To be honest that was my first thought, but it seemed a bit too obvious to be an idiom.
mafketis 17 | 6,510    
22 Feb 2019  #73
To lick one`s fingers

finger lickin' good! (original slogan of KFC when it was kentucky fried chicken and not a weird sandwich and milkshake place...) (assuming that's palce lizańá)

To refuse to bend a finger

to not lift a finger?
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
22 Feb 2019  #74
Would this mean to eagerly anticipate something, as in licking one's lips?

Yes, but primarily it refers to tasty food anticipation.

to not lift a finger?

Yes, exactly.

That strikes me as having virtually the same meaning then. If a person is not going to budge an inch,

Not quite. This inch idiom suggests obstinacy, stubborness. While finger idiom means the refusal to take action. e..g, I won`t bend a finger to defend you, you little rascal!

Another one: My mum often said (in imperative style but addressing nobody in particular): Be wise and write poems
Chemikiem 5 | 1,323    
24 Feb 2019  #75
While finger idiom means the refusal to take action

Ok, thanks, I can see the difference now.

Be wise and write poems

Not sure about this one. I'm inclined to think it's something along the lines of find something worthwhile to do? Do something beneficial/constructive with your time? Not sure about the relevance to poems though.
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
  24 Feb 2019  #76
something along the lines of find something worthwhile to do? Do something beneficial/constructive with your time?

No, it is an expression of helplessness when you jave no idea whatsoever how to deal with sth.

You should know this one: the scythe hit the rock. (actually, ran into)
Chemikiem 5 | 1,323    
  24 Feb 2019  #77
Is it the equivalent of 'to hit a brick wall?' To run into some sort of problem that makes you stop what you're doing? An insurmountable obstacle as such.

it is an expression of helplessness when you jave no idea whatsoever how to deal with sth.

I wouldn't have got that one!
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
24 Feb 2019  #78
Is it the equivalent of 'to hit a brick wall?'

Yes! But it involves some active resistance which blocks the progress as well as an element of surprise because the resistance wasn`t expected.

To go out of (one`s) skin (to do sth).
Chemikiem 5 | 1,323    
24 Feb 2019  #79
We have a saying ' to get under one's skin' which means to try and find out what a person thinks and feels, or that someone is very irritating, but I don't think this is it. To 'jump out of one's skin' is to be scared or surprised by something, but I don't think it means that either. I'll have to think some more.......
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
24 Feb 2019  #80
To go out of one`s skin means to do your best, to strive to do sth. Similar expressions are to stand on your eyelashes/ stand on your head.

To 'jump out of one's skin' is to be scared or surprised by something,

This one is the same in Polish.

Now, nouns. What kind of a husband is slipper man?
Chemikiem 5 | 1,323    
24 Feb 2019  #81
One that doesn't leave the house too often ;)

Does it mean a husband that does what he's told, and the wife is in charge? In the UK we have a phrase ' to wear the trousers', and generally it refers to a woman who is the one in control of the relationship.
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
24 Feb 2019  #82
Does it mean a husband that does what he's told, and the wife is in charge?

Yes, exactly.

What does it mean sheet metal lover about a woman, but mostly young one.
Chemikiem 5 | 1,323    
26 Feb 2019  #83
No idea at all about this one :-(
mafketis 17 | 6,510    
27 Feb 2019  #84
sheet metal lover about a woman, but mostly young one

I understand this (the word is 'blachara' )but AFAIK there's no equivalent in (American) English...

It refers to a young woman who wants a guy with a hot car and/or likes to pose for pictures with cars...

joemonster.org/i/d/laskisamochodyaq005.jpg
Ziemowit 12 | 3,201    
27 Feb 2019  #85
He gave me a finger

That`s not a Polish idiom, I am afraid.

Actually, something very similar to that is a Polish idiom: give him a finger and he'll take the whole hand.
Chemikiem 5 | 1,323    
27 Feb 2019  #86
It refers to a young woman who wants a guy with a hot car and/or likes to pose for pictures with cars...

Aha...I can see that now.

give him a finger and he'll take the whole hand.

We would say ' give him an inch and he'll take a mile'.
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
27 Feb 2019  #87
I understand this (the word is 'blachara' )

Exactly, once I didn`t know it but students explained it to me. :) We talked about our likes and dislikes and one of them used that word.

Actually, something very similar to that is a Polish idiom:

When you quoted another poster, one idiom came to my mind: to mix sb with mud.
Chemikiem 5 | 1,323    
27 Feb 2019  #88
Is that to blacken a person's reputation?
OP pawian 143 | 7,217    
27 Feb 2019  #89
Yes, in a nasty way.
Chemikiem 5 | 1,323    
27 Feb 2019  #90
That is the only way that can be meant.

Looking for a hole in the whole.


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