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Game - guess Polish idioms/sayings in direct English translation


Lyzko 20 | 6,152    
18 Apr 2019  #271
"Bzdura" is the expression with which I'm most familiar. I remind myself of that high school slogan from several years ago MATURA BZDURA! This helps me to recall the word.
Chemikiem 5 | 1,449    
20 Apr 2019  #272
false promises which can`t be fulfilled and you fully realise they are false.

Yes, I knew it would be easy for you :) As to the origin of the idiom, I have no idea.

it is a pip for/to me.

Now as maf indicated earlier, adding those last couple of words made all the difference. If it's right it means the same as ' It's a cinch', a very easy task, something simple to do.
mafketis 17 | 6,752    
20 Apr 2019  #273
Now as maf indicated earlier, adding those last couple of words made all the difference

I think it was also the translation of pestka as 'pip' that made it hard for me... there used to be different words for different kinds of seeds but for many/most modern speakers they've disappeared... I still say peach pit and maybe cherry pit but use 'seed' for everything else... even mango (where pit might also fit)

Do British speakers still use words like pip and stone for different kinds of seeds?
Chemikiem 5 | 1,449    
21 Apr 2019  #274
Yes we do. Apples, oranges and lemons have pips, while peaches, cherries,plums and mangoes have stones for exampe. I'm guessing 'pit' must be more of an American term, I've never heard it used in the UK.
OP pawian 150 | 7,905    
27 Apr 2019  #275
Now as maf indicated earlier, adding those last couple of words made all the difference.

I added it after seeing it was a problem to guess that sole "pip", but normally we don`t say them, pip is enough.

I think it was also the translation of pestka as 'pip' that made it hard for me...

Yes, I was looking for and hesitating over a proper word for about 5 minutes.

Apples, oranges and lemons have pips, while peaches, cherries,plums and mangoes have stones for exampe.

Very interesting, I will surely remember it now. The beneficial effect of the forums. :)
PS. I must know vocabulary because students constantly enquire how to say sth in English. Rarely am I at a loss. :) Fortunately, they haven`t asked about seeds in fruit yet.

to be salt in sb`s eye
mafketis 17 | 6,752    
27 Apr 2019  #276
they haven`t asked about seeds in fruit yet.

In my (US) dialect they're all seeds except for peaches (pits), plums, cherries and mangoes can also have pits but I think seed is more common.

Speakers of monocentric languages (like Polish) who learn a polycentric language (like english or spanish) is they want a word/expression that works everywhere and... they often don't exist.
Chemikiem 5 | 1,449    
28 Apr 2019  #277
Fortunately, they haven`t asked about seeds in fruit yet.

Just to confuse the issue..............grapes are a bit of a strange one. These days most grapes sold seem to be of the seedless variety, but it was quite common a few years back to see signs in greengrocers' shops advertising seedless grapes. Personally, I would still refer to grape seeds as pips, but it's possible that some people may refer to them as seeds.

Generally, when talking about seeds in the UK, it's most often used in the context of sowing them.

to be salt in sb`s eye

I would say that it means to be very annoying and troublesome for somebody?
OP pawian 150 | 7,905    
28 Apr 2019  #278
seeds in the UK, it's most often used in the context of sowing them.

Yes, apart from my gardening hobby, I know it from primary school books which I use sometimes. :)

I would say that it means to be very annoying and troublesome for somebody?

Yes!

(to apply) the method of stick and carrot.
mafketis 17 | 6,752    
28 Apr 2019  #279
it's the same in English... although the order is usually carrot and stick (does the order say something?)

Has 'to have something in one's little finger' been here yet?
Chemikiem 5 | 1,449    
28 Apr 2019  #280
(to apply) the method of stick and carrot.

As maf said, in English it's carrot and stick. It's a reward or threat of punishment method.
OP pawian 150 | 7,905    
28 Apr 2019  #281
You are both right, it is the same one, and the order doesn`t matter.

'to have something in one's little finger'

To know sth very well.

it`s been sucked out of one`s finger.
OP pawian 150 | 7,905    
12 May 2019  #282
Sb/sth is in powder. ?
Chemikiem 5 | 1,449    
12 May 2019  #283
it`s been sucked out of one`s finger.

I think it's the equivalent of pulling something out of thin air, to imply that an answer is a wild guess without any evidence.

Sb/sth is in powder. ?

Sort of means to be in the sh!t being unprepared and not ready for something? e.g you're in the shower and suddenly realise you were meant to be somewhere 10 minutes ago?
OP pawian 150 | 7,905    
12 May 2019  #284
Yes, exactly, both guesses correct. Weclome back! :):)

To take sth off the ceiling/ it`s been taken off the ceiling.
mafketis 17 | 6,752    
12 May 2019  #285
pulling something out of thin air,

a lot more polite than my crude American version "he pulled that out of his @ss"....

which leads me to.... "it doesn't rip (one's) @ss"
OP pawian 150 | 7,905    
12 May 2019  #286
It is too poor/weak to impress anybody. :)
Chemikiem 5 | 1,449    
12 May 2019  #287
To take sth off the ceiling/ it`s been taken off the ceiling.

To take sth out of the equation? Something no longer relevant?

a lot more polite than my crude American version "he pulled that out of his @ss"..

I think there's a subtle difference. Pulling sth out of thin air means pretty much the same as a stab in the dark - a guess based on very little information, whereas " he pulled that out of his @ss" means someone who is talking bollox. Or maybe I'm just being pedantic......

"it doesn't rip (one's) @ss"

Something unimpressive.
OP pawian 150 | 7,905    
12 May 2019  #288
To take sth out of the equation? Something no longer relevant?

Sorry. But I might offer a hint - it is very close to another idiom which appeared on this page. And it often refers to calculations, figures and data.
Chemikiem 5 | 1,449    
14 May 2019  #289
Something is over budget, too expensive? Not financially viable?
Not sure which idiom is close to it, but for some reason I am leaning towards carrot and stick.....
OP pawian 150 | 7,905    
14 May 2019  #290
Nope. Taken off the ceiling is close to sucked from the finger. About calculations, it means sth taken off the top of your head.

to plane/whittle a madman.
Chemikiem 5 | 1,449    
15 May 2019  #291
To pretend not to know about something or pretend to be a bit dim?
OP pawian 150 | 7,905    
15 May 2019  #292
Yes, exactly!

to do/make/turn sb into grey.
Chemikiem 5 | 1,449    
15 May 2019  #293
To pull a fast one? To trick or deceive?
OP pawian 150 | 7,905    
15 May 2019  #294
Yes!

on/into the cross
Chemikiem 5 | 1,449    
16 May 2019  #295
I'm afraid I'm a bit stumped by this one. I can only think of UK idiom 'to nail someone to the wall', but I really don't think it's this.
OP pawian 150 | 7,905    
16 May 2019  #296
The idiom doesn`t imply the cross as a real item, let alone of religious meaning. Only its graphic representation, like in a drawing - X.
Chemikiem 5 | 1,449    
1 day ago  #297
I can only think of 'X' marks the spot to show the exact location of something, but I don't think that's right either.
OP pawian 150 | 7,905    
17 hours ago  #298
Well, it also means very few/little of sth. It comes from a small village context: it is so small there are only two streets into the cross. - dwie ulice na krzy┼╝ (i.e. crossing). But you can also use it in other contexts.

What has shot into your head/napper?
Chemikiem 5 | 1,449    
4 hours ago  #299
it also means very few/little of sth.

Ok, thanks for that. Quite a sweet little idiom, two roads on the cross.

I presume that napper is another word for head? I have never heard this word before.
Does it refer to someone who has crazy thoughts?


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