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Game - guess Polish idioms/sayings in direct English translation


OP pawian 153 | 8,460
7 Apr 2019  #241
Are you even Polish pawian?

No, głuptasku, I have dropped from the moon. :) Why?
jon357 64 | 14,382
7 Apr 2019  #242
Indeed. Damski bokser sounds better than wife-beater.
mafketis 17 | 6,910
7 Apr 2019  #243
Well a woman attacked by a damski bokser is not necessarily his wife...
OP pawian 153 | 8,460
7 Apr 2019  #244
a man who is physically violent toward women (clear in Polish but ambiguous in English

I was thinking about lady`s boxer but somehow I had doubts if it was better than a female boxer.
jon357 64 | 14,382
7 Apr 2019  #245
A wife-beater's partner generally gets the brunt of it.
OP pawian 153 | 8,460
7 Apr 2019  #246
Before I forget: to jiggle sth like a priest jiggles an envelope. :):)
Chemikiem 5 | 1,605
10 Apr 2019  #247
With the expectancy of ready cash but I'm sure that's not quite what it means ;)
OP pawian 153 | 8,460
10 Apr 2019  #248
The cash is the priest`s expectancy but he serves as a metaphor, so the whole saying isn`t about cash but.......
Chemikiem 5 | 1,605
11 Apr 2019  #249
Some sort of other reward? The idiom seems to be similar to dangling a carrot in front of someone. To try to entice someone to do something by offering a reward, not necessarily monetary.
OP pawian 153 | 8,460
11 Apr 2019  #250
Yes, it is about any reward which is supposed to fulfill your impatient expectancy. Sometimes used in lewd contexts. There is a long list of funny I would.......like..... expressions:

I would knock like Jehova`s witnesses at the deaf man`s door.
zapytaj.onet.pl/Category/001,002/2,26374217,Lista_tekstow_z_serii_quotbralbymquot_Znacie_je_.html

Sth is sewn with thick threads
jon357 64 | 14,382
11 Apr 2019  #251
Someone just wrote this in a message to me while saying goodnight: "cmokam w lewą skroń"

The literal meaning about kissing the left temple is obvious, however does it have an idiomatic meaning as well? I don't remember every hearing it.

I don't really think she wants to give me a smacker on the left temple....
Chemikiem 5 | 1,605
12 Apr 2019  #252
Sth is sewn with thick threads

At a guess it means something that is easy to see through and expose? A tale that is very economical with the truth perhaps?
OP pawian 153 | 8,460
12 Apr 2019  #253
kissing the left temple is obvious, however does it have an idiomatic meaning as well?

Kissing on the temple reveals a really deep affection. Somebody is hitting on you. Why left is a mystery to me.

At a guess it means something that is easy to see through and expose?

Yes, exactly!

To pull up sleeves (and do sth)
jon357 64 | 14,382
12 Apr 2019  #254
Kissing on the temple reveals a really deep affection. Somebody is hitting on you.

Thanks. She is a bit full on, to say the least.
Chemikiem 5 | 1,605
14 Apr 2019  #255
o pull up sleeves (and do sth)

To get on with e.g the job at hand ? In the UK we would roll up our sleeves and get on with the job.
OP pawian 153 | 8,460
16 Apr 2019  #256
Yes, it is the same thing.

What does this comment mean?: - it`s a pip.
Chemikiem 5 | 1,605
17 Apr 2019  #257
Really not sure about this one. Does it mean something very good, pleasing? Similar to it's a gem as we would say in the UK perhaps? Or a defeat by a narrow margin?
OP pawian 153 | 8,460
17 Apr 2019  #258
Sorry, no. The pip means that seed inside fruit. You say so when. e.g., you are going to somehow take part in an approaching situation.
Chemikiem 5 | 1,605
18 Apr 2019  #259
I wouldn't have got that one.

My turn, although mine are always too easy for you....

Pears on a willow
OP pawian 153 | 8,460
18 Apr 2019  #260
I wouldn't have got that one.

Hey, I provided a clue but the riddle with that pip is still unsolved! :):) When is it used exactly?

Pears on a willow

It is about false promises which can`t be fulfilled and you fully realise they are false. Was it originated in 1940-1050s when the Soviet pseudo scientist Lysenko played tricks with plants genetics?
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,727
18 Apr 2019  #261
You say so when. e.g., you are going to somehow take part in an approaching situation.

to be honest, Pawian, I have never heard of such a phrase, using 'pip'.
the only one I can think of is 'it gives me the pip'
en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/give_someone_the_pip
OP pawian 153 | 8,460
18 Apr 2019  #262
Do you mean it doesn`t exist and I made it up? :))
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,727
18 Apr 2019  #263
er...no, , perhaps you got it mixed up with something else?
OP pawian 153 | 8,460
18 Apr 2019  #264
:):) No, rather not, I checked it twice. Pip is the seed inside some fruit, e..g, plums, cherries, right? So I got it right. You say: it is a pip for/to me.
jon357 64 | 14,382
18 Apr 2019  #265
Pip is the seed inside some fruit,

Apples, pears, raspberries etc have pips. Plums, cherries, peaches have stones.

I tried to answer quickly, in case somebody pipped me to the post...
OP pawian 153 | 8,460
18 Apr 2019  #266
Apples, pears, raspberries etc have pips. Plums, cherries, peaches have stones.

I see. But it is still the same, whether a pip or a stone, it is one word in Polish.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,727
18 Apr 2019  #267
"it is a pip for me" - never heard that - maybe it is American?

isn't it interesting that Amerecan hooey is really chuj

pipped me to the post.

good one jon -
mafketis 17 | 6,910
18 Apr 2019  #268
: it is a pip for/to me.

It's very easy! (or something very minor) (was blanking on the Polish word until you added the 'for/to me')

isn't it interesting that Amerecan hooey is really chuj

Is it? the meaning is different enough (the American meaning is 'nonsense' which is not how it's used in Polish, where in addition to the literal meaning it can mean something like 'rotten jerk' or 'worthless'...
Ziemowit 12 | 3,393
18 Apr 2019  #269
American meaning is 'nonsense' which is not how it's used in Polish, where in addition to the literal meaning

This double meaning is well reflected in an old joke going back to the time when they were starting to build the first railway line in Russia.

The construction team went to tsar Alexander and asked him if the gauge (rozstaw torów) in Russia should be the same as in Europe or wider (szerszy). Tsar Alexander listened to their plea and told them the verdict in the form of a question: A na chuj szerszy? But the problem, however, was that they had a different grasp of the phrase than what tsar Alexander meant.
jon357 64 | 14,382
18 Apr 2019  #270
isn't it interesting that Amerecan hooey is really chuj

I always wondered about that, as soon as I heard the Polish word (or asked someone what this HWDP is that seemed to be written on every wall in Warsaw)

it can mean something like 'rotten jerk' or 'worthless'...

"A heap of hooey", roughly cognate to the well-known English language expession "bunch of arse".


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