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Differences in Polish and English idioms


Teffle 22 | 1,321
12 Jan 2011 #31
I use it, but only if I am trying to be amusing by using an out of date idiom...

; )

Plus, it's nicer than saying it's pishing down, no?

Funny enough I don't really say that. Not that I'm averse to using the word generally mind you. I think my default is usually "lashing"
Cardno85 31 | 976
13 Jan 2011 #32
; )

I also use a "Glasgow University" accent while saying it.
strzyga 2 | 993
13 Jan 2011 #33
I wonder if there is any English idiom for kiełbasa wyborcza, meaning all the promises and nice gestures that politicians make before elections?

Other idioms I like: dziad o gruszce, baba o pietruszce - grandpa talking about a pear and grandma about a parsley - for miscommunication

wlazł na gruszkę, rwał pietruszkę, cebula leciała - he climbed a pear tree, picked parsley and onions fell down - for somebody talking nonsense

gruszki na wierzbie - pears on a willow tree - illusions

am I hungry, or what?..
z_darius 14 | 3,968
13 Jan 2011 #34
another couple funny ones:

puścić bąka - (to release a bumble bee): to fart
puścić tajniaka - (to release a secret agent/an undercover agent): to fart quietly
Teffle 22 | 1,321
13 Jan 2011 #35
I also use a "Glasgow University" accent while saying it.

Would that be "cats n' dugs" or the "pishing" part?
MrEp - | 26
15 Jan 2011 #36
but to fit like a fist to an eye means that something doesn't fit really...

Same here:
Pasować jak kwiatek do kożucha (to fit like a flower to a sheepskin coat)
Pasować jak wół do karocy (to fit like an ox to a coach)

Some other nice idioms:
Udawać Greka (to pretend to be a Greek) - to pretend that you don't understand a thing
Siedzieć jak na tureckim kazaniu (to sit like on a Turkish sermon) - to listen to something, while being unable to understand a thing
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
15 Jan 2011 #37
noreenb
Isn't 'summa summarum' the equivalent of 'the bottom line'?
noreenb 7 | 557
22 Jan 2011 #38
Summa summarum, my favourite example of Latin saying, "suma sum" lub "wszystko razem"...
Good times of my life, when I was learning Latin are in front of my mind now. Thanks for that. Yes, it is.
:)
'Merican
27 Feb 2013 #39
Im an american and honesetly I hear "its raining cats and dogs!" a lot. I guess it depends on where in America you are, because I live in the south and we say idioms a lot, that one being a main example when it is raining.
Rysavy 10 | 308
27 Feb 2013 #40
(Eng) "kick the bucket"(Pl) "Kick the calendar"

My polish language buddy cracked up when he heard me say that..then came me listing all the similar I knew> he was very interested in colloquials like "dirt nap""bought the farm"

My Fiance cracks up occasionally and has to stop the presses so I can explain when one just flows into the conversation

And while we're on the subject of idioms, note to all, virtually NOBODY uses the phrase "raining cats and dogs" !!

I'm american born and heard that one all my life in every location. But I have always lived south the 40degree mark and mostly West Coast

Southern expressions..
happier than a dead pig in sunshine - happy indeed
plumb tuckered -exhausted
he loves her so much he'd rope the moon for her- loved indeed (Pecos Bill , texas fairy tales)
get off your high horse -quit being pretentious/being condecending
Ain't got sense to come in from the rain - irresponisble or no common sense
right as rain- correct

because my generation dad was older maybe..but I use and many of my family in Texas family use:

Now your cooking with gas! (now your have a great idea/are on the right track
Best idea/greatest thing since sliced bread! (innovative or simply great
someone is "The cat's meow"= all that and a bag of chips( AWESOME
up the creek without a paddle (in serious dilema
so broke he can't even pay attention
naked as a jaybird (completely disarmed or unrobed..though birds have feathers ; / )
apple didnt fall far from tree (about a child resembling parent in habit or appearance
almost only counts in horseshoes 'n' hand grenades (it doesnt count/matter
what's that got to do with the price of tea in china? ("that" -usually a coment or observation- has no bearing on current conversation/problem

6 ways from sunday (using every option
shutting the barn door after the horse got out (too late
you can "x" (argue, run, sleep etc) til the cows come home (til the end

so many more... but these are the ones that amused my verbal contacts
grubas 12 | 1,391
27 Feb 2013 #41
Polish: "Między młotem a kowadłem"

English equiv: "Between the devil and the deep blue sea"

never heard that. Shouldn't be "Between rock and a hard place"?

I recently heard a funny idiom in Polish: "Once in a Russian year" which in English sounds Once in a blue moon :-)
I wonder where did it come from...

Russia has introduced Gregorian calendar only in 1917 while Poland and most countries did that in XVI century.Russian year was longer,for instance Russian October revolution happened in November according to Gregorian calender.
Rysavy 10 | 308
27 Feb 2013 #42
Between the devil and the deep blue sea

yep heard that one.. rock n a hard place.. horns of dilema

oh and near forgot
pot calling the kettle black (hypocrisy
out of the frying pan into the fire (choosing bad to worse
no guts no glory (nothing ventured nothing gained
don't burn all your bridges (dont shut off all options
dont judge a book by it's cover (saying don't judge at first glance
polishignorant
22 Oct 2015 #43
what does edek z krainy kredek mean? Is this a saying/
jon357 63 | 15,107
22 Oct 2015 #44
It's the name of a nursery rhyme which starts something like W krainie kredek żył sobie Edek (Teddy lived in the land of chalks).
Pedro 1955
27 Mar 2016 #45
Nie bzykam na boku.

What does this mean in English? The literal translation makes no sense.
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
27 Mar 2016 #46
Nie bzykam na boku

I do not copulate on the side, ie I do not enage in illicit (premarital or extramarital) sex.

na boku

Of course, this could also be a double entendre meaning: I do not copulate while lying on my side. (Shades of Kamasutra!?)
iwonkaalaska
1 Oct 2016 #47
so my grandma used to tell me..
"kolorowe snów"..colorful dreams
then my very funny mom still says to me when my hair is out of place, that my hair looks like the hair "pod psa pod ogonem

which says that its from under the dogs tail!
NowyPoster
2 Oct 2016 #48
I wish you to dream in color - kolorowych snów - or I wish you a good dream - dobrych snów, meaning 'good night', said to a loved one.

Does the native speakers of English think it would be a strange way of saying good night?
TicTacToe
2 Oct 2016 #49
As a native English speaker, to say " I wish you to dream in colour " is a bit bizarre. Why would I not dream in colour, will something happen if I dream in black and white ?.

I wish you a good dream isn't so bad, I guess it's better than having a nightmare !.

Goodnight isn't used as a term in the sense, i hope you have a goodnight, dream in colour or don't have a nightmare.

It's more, I will see later goodbye for now.
NowyPoster
2 Oct 2016 #50
Why would I not dream in colour, will something happen if I dream in black and white?

If your life have little light or lacks color and brightness and is as a dark, gloomy and dull November, it is better to have colorful dreams than a gray once, isn't it?
kpc21 1 | 763
2 Oct 2016 #51
Wishing "colorful dreams" makes sense. Colorful means here interesting and nice.
mafketis 24 | 8,703
2 Oct 2016 #52
Wishing "colorful dreams" makes sense

Does it? I don't know if I would wish this on anyone...



(old Polish boyband with exactly one hit, which was this)
NowyPoster
2 Oct 2016 #53
I don't know if I would wish this on anyone...

This one is better:

youtube.com/watch?v=EK8oWDluu18
TicTacToe
2 Oct 2016 #54
The only term in the English language to suggest anything about the content of a dream is "sweet dreams " and even then I think that's more an American term, I don't use it and I am English.

I've never heard anyone ever wish anyone colourful dreams.

It's either,

Night or morning - informal

Good morning or goodnight - formal

And to a child that I knew, I would say something like; Night, don't let the bedbugs bite.
mafketis 24 | 8,703
2 Oct 2016 #55
The only term in the English language to suggest anything about the content of a dream is "sweet dreams "

Well it does have a great song behind it.

youtube.com/watch?v=imafHIq2210

I've never heard anyone ever wish anyone colourful dreams.

Certainly not in English, though alongside "sweet dreams" there's "pleasant dreams" too, maybe also more American than British?

I would say something like; Night, don't let the bedbugs bite

Sleep tight! Don't let the bedbugs bite! is the version I'm familiar with.

Another Polish expression with no clear English equivalent is "smacznie spać" often translated as "sleep soundly" but often used in very different contexts.
TicTacToe
2 Oct 2016 #56
Yeah true, " pleasant dreams " but still I never hear it used really. People can say what they like really, but as a native speaker if someone said colourful dreams I would know instantly they're not native speakers.

Whateverrrrrr !
mafketis 24 | 8,703
2 Oct 2016 #57
f someone said colourful dreams I would know instantly they're not native speakers.

True enough. Except that there was an idea floating around a few years ago that "native speaker" is a myth invented to reinforce unequal social relations.

sample:

youtube.com/watch?v=OG8q99fLn0o
kpc21 1 | 763
2 Oct 2016 #58
Night, don't let the bedbugs bite.

Karaluchy pod poduchy!


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