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Differences between Poland and Russia


BobTheBuilder 1 | 1
25 Nov 2013  #1
Both have vodka, so where's the difference?
johnb121 4 | 184
25 Nov 2013  #2
History and current reality
Wlodzimierz 4 | 544
25 Nov 2013  #3
Simple. Polish wódka's nearly 100 proof, Russian is barely 80LOL
Well, their both big lushes. That though's more of an immediate similarity than any real difference.
pam
26 Nov 2013  #4
Russian is barely 80LOL

Stolichnaya Blue Label is 100 proof....................

Well, their both big lushes

I'm sure you meant to say they're ;)
Wlodzimierz 4 | 544
26 Nov 2013  #5
I most assuredly did, thank you Pamela! Frankly, I prefer Zima to Stolichnaya, but that's purely personal:-)
Wulkan - | 3,251
26 Nov 2013  #6
Both have vodka, so where's the difference?

Russians drink it more.
OP BobTheBuilder 1 | 1
26 Nov 2013  #7
This was actually a serious question, because in western Europe, we don't learn much about other countries than Germany, UK, France and the US. The vodka thing was only to show that we know almost nothing about eastern countries.
Wulkan - | 3,251
26 Nov 2013  #8
because in western Europe, we don't learn much about other countries than Germany, UK, France and the US.

In every single country in "Western Europe"?
johnb121 4 | 184
26 Nov 2013  #9
While Poland is moving (in many aspects HAS moved) into what I would think of as modern rights and freedoms, Russia appears to be content to move rapidly in the other direction. Whatever complaints one might have about PL is run, Russia is moving back to being a dictatorship with some pretty rotten ideas about human rights.
Ironside 48 | 9,796
26 Nov 2013  #10
For starters Poland is an European Country while Russian is not and never were. Poland has been an old European nation Kingdom on the European continent a power along with Spain, France and Hungary constituting a core of mainland Europe.

Asking about Differences between Poland and Russia is like asking for Differences between France and England.
TheOther 5 | 3,801
26 Nov 2013  #11
...a power along with Spain, France and Hungary constituting a core of mainland Europe

Interestingly though, except when talking about WW2, Poland is never mentioned in history classes in the west as far as I know. Spain, Britain, France and some other old nations, yes ... Poland, no.
Ironside 48 | 9,796
26 Nov 2013  #12
You mean in English speaking countries. There could be several reason for that. Firstly Anglo countries where never interested in this part of Europe and expect say Renaissance they had a vague idea what going on there. Secondly once England became a Protestant country they have been budding their identity in opposition to Catholic countries in that climate some cultural influx or exchange of ideas have been rather stifled. They knew a lot about Prussia and England has been supporting Prussia for a long time, naturally Prussia has been Poland's enemy and has been viewed in the light of Prussian anti-Polish propaganda (Thorn).

Last but not least was the fact that most of 18th century (about 1730) Poland has been Russian protectorate. On the top of it Poland didn't existed as an independent country during XIX century, that century which seen formation and birth of new nations and new states like Italy, Romania and Germany. Also XIX century have been a peek of European imperialism with colonies all over the world. Poland missed all that due to partitions.
Wulkan - | 3,251
26 Nov 2013  #13
, Poland is never mentioned in history classes in the west as far as I know

once again, what do you mean by "west"? Greece? Finland? Portugal? USA?
TheOther 5 | 3,801
26 Nov 2013  #14
what do you mean by "west"?

The standard definition: European countries on the other side of the former Iron Curtain, plus USA, Canada, Australia and NZ.
Ironside 48 | 9,796
26 Nov 2013  #15
es, but I'm quite sure that early Polish history isn't taught outside of Poland unless it is somehow interconnected with another country's history. Like the Hanseatic League for example or the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth. If you think about it, why should it? Australian history is probably not part of Polish history classes either.

Interestingly though, except when talking about WW2, Poland is never mentioned in history classes in the west as far as I know. Spain, Britain, France and some other old nations, yes ... Poland, no.

So what are you saying?
Well, is early history of Germany taught in Australasia? If Poland history is not taught in history classes about history of Europe on Uni it means that is a poorly prepared and not nonprofessional courses. Anyway lately Universities are mostly interested in propaganda especially on courses classified as Art.
Vlad1234 14 | 575
26 Nov 2013  #16
Both have vodka, so where's the difference?

Nie zajmuj, to kość biała!
TheOther 5 | 3,801
26 Nov 2013  #17
So what are you saying?

I am saying that the proud history of Poland might not be recognized as such outside of Poland - referring to your statement that "Poland has been ... a power along with Spain, France and Hungary constituting a core of mainland Europe". Has nothing to do with propaganda in my eyes, but simply with the fact that the British Empire dominated the world for a very long time and almost any other nation outside its realm was ... well ... not really important. IMO, this attitude can still be found in the Anglo-American world to this very day. So to answer your question: almost nobody in Australia or the USA gives a hoot about German, Polish or Japanese history - unless we talk about WW1 and WW2 of course.
Des Essientes 7 | 1,291
26 Nov 2013  #18
EuropeInterestingly though, except when talking about WW2, Poland is never mentioned in history classes in the west as far as I know.

The partitions of Poland are mentioned in high school history classes in the United States and the textbooks used often include a famous political cartoon, of the time, depicting three fat and ugly caricatures of the partitioning powers.
Ironside 48 | 9,796
26 Nov 2013  #19
So to answer your question: almost nobody in Australia or the USA gives a hoot about German, Polish or Japanese history - unless we talk about WW1 and WW2 of course.

OK?Tell me something /i don't know. I mean to say - so what?
TheOther 5 | 3,801
26 Nov 2013  #20
The partitions of Poland are mentioned in high school history classes in the United States and the textbooks used often include a famous political cartoon, of the time, depicting three fat and ugly caricatures of the partitioning powers.

Thanks for reposting without the crap, Des. This can't be countrywide, because I know for a fact that there are highschools in CA, OR and WA which do not teach the partitions in their history classes/ curriculum. Where did you go to school? Chicago by any chance?
R.U.R.
26 Nov 2013  #21
TheOther

British Empire dominated the world for a very long time and almost any other nation outside its realm was ... well ... not really important. IMO, this attitude can still be found in the Anglo-American world to this very day.

dominated the world except Eurpope, and this means that British Empire has never been a world power
Des Essientes 7 | 1,291
26 Nov 2013  #22
Where did you go to school?

I went to public high school in Southern California and the partitions of Poland were included in the history curriculum.

I know for a fact that there are highschools in CA, OR and WA which do not teach the partitions in their history classes/ curriculum.

Are you really sure that you know this for a "fact"?

Chicago by any chance?

Polish-Americans live throughout the United States. It isn't just in places wherein they are highly concentrated that Poland is mentioned in history courses. It isn't always lobbying by an ethnic group that gets its ancestral homeland's history included in curricula, and it most certainly isn't the case with respect to Polish history. The partitions of Poland are included in history courses in the USA because they are such blatant cases of the greed and immorality of autocracies. The republic of the United States uses the actions of Prussia, Austro-Hungary, and Russia as negative examples when educating her citizenry.
delphiandomine 83 | 17,679
26 Nov 2013  #23
The republic of the United States uses the actions of Prussia, Austro-Hungary, and Russia as negative examples when educating her citizenry.

Does the United States also use the example of Polish expansionism as a case against imperialism?
Wulkan - | 3,251
26 Nov 2013  #24
The standard definition: European countries on the other side of the former Iron Curtain, plus USA, Canada, Australia and NZ.

What about Japan?
TheOther 5 | 3,801
26 Nov 2013  #25
It isn't always lobbying by an ethnic group that gets its ancestral homeland's history included in curricula, and it most certainly isn't the case with respect to Polish history.

My question is legit - just think of Texas and the evolution/creationism debate there. If the lobby is strong enough you can get almost everything into the school books nowadays.

Are you really sure that you know this for a "fact"?

I've heard rumors that there are people out there who have kids in highschool... :)

What about Japan?

First world country, but different culture than the "west".
Ironside 48 | 9,796
26 Nov 2013  #26
Does the United States also use the example of Polish expansionism as a case against imperialism?

Stop that nonsense.
delphiandomine 83 | 17,679
26 Nov 2013  #27
How else can you explain Poland stretching from the Black Sea to the Baltic Sea?
R.U.R.
26 Nov 2013  #28
As far as I know a monument in London was erected to the polish king Jan Sobieski who defeated The Turkish army so Poland was at the time very, very important even for the British who are lucky enough to live on the islands, if it weren't for Jan Sobieski would most of Europe be Christian today (Britain included )?

//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ultra
Winston Churchill told King George VI: "It was thanks to Ultra that we won the war."
Sir Harry Hinsley, official historian of British Intelligence in World War II, made a similar assessment about Ultra, saying that it shortened the war "by not less than two years and probably by four years"; and that, in the absence of Ultra, it is uncertain how the war would have ended.

//en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ultra
It was the Poles' early start at breaking Enigma, and the continuity of their successful efforts, that enabled the Allies to hit the ground running when World War II broke out.

In 1920 Poland defeated Soviet Russians who were ready to introduce communist system all over Europe, Britain included ( the so called world revolution )

The American war of theindependence aroused much interest in Poland. Pulaski and Kosciuszko were but the most famous of the many Poles who fought in this war and helped win theindependence of the United States.

Indeed the country is very unimportant and if indulge in drinking (especially polish vodka) it may seem even less important
TheOther 5 | 3,801
26 Nov 2013  #29
We were talking about history classes in school, RUR.
Wulkan - | 3,251
26 Nov 2013  #30
First world country, but different culture than the "west".

I understand so Portugal, Greece and Finland have the same culture, "west" culture, wow


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