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Posts by DominicB  

Joined: 28 Sep 2012 / Male ♂
Warnings: 1 - O
Last Post: 23 Sep 2020
Threads: -
Posts: 2,709
From: Chicago
Speaks Polish?: Yes

Displayed posts: 2709 / page 1 of 91
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DominicB   
23 Sep 2020
Food / What Polish foods and brands do you miss when you go to other countries? [186]

However you got the idea that eel pie exists is beyond me. It doesn't. Nor does the firm you cited deliver eel pie. Can't deliver what doesn't exist.

The firm you linked to is not a traditional pie and mash shop, for one. It's a startup by some woman from Felixstowe.

They do deliver jellied eel, MEAT pies and mashed potatoes by special (refrigerated) culinary courier fresh to your door on certain days of the week, but they don't ship them by mail.

Your reading comprehension could do with some work.
DominicB   
23 Sep 2020
Food / What Polish foods and brands do you miss when you go to other countries? [186]

Traditional in the East End of London. They have Eel Pie and mash shops.

Eel Pie

There is no "eel pie". Where you got that idea from, I don't know. The eel served in those shops was jelled eel, served alongside meat pies.

A few shops have started supplying meat pies by mail order. None supply jellied eel, which cannot be shipped by mail.
DominicB   
23 Sep 2020
Food / What Polish foods and brands do you miss when you go to other countries? [186]

I read that eel isn`t appreciated in Britain. Is it true?

Traditional in the East End of London. They have Eel Pie and mash shops.

More like the used to have Pie and mash shops that served jellied eel as well. Pie and mash shops are a dying breed, and only a handful of the remaining ones still serve jellied eel, which is all cooked by a single shop in the East End. He supplies the few others, who each might serve a serving or two a day, if that. People have become quite squeamish about eating it, and are reluctant to even try it. Shame, because it's quite tasty. They are also turned off by the idea of anything savory in aspic (galareta).

Demand for eel has plummeted to the point where there is no longer any commercial eel fishing conducted in the UK for human consumption. What little ends up in the nets is sold to producers of cat food. All of the eel sold in the UK for human consumption is sold by a single fishmonger in Billingsgate, who imports it from the Netherlands. Most of it is consumed as sushi, and only a piddling and ever decreasing amount for jellied eel. Very few people cook it at home, and very few fish for eels anymore.

Also, the meat pies used to contain mutton, which, like eel, has fallen out of fashion and has been replaced with beef.

So British people rarely, if ever, eat eel nowadays, even though it was once quite popular. If they do, it is likely to be as sushi.

The reason for the odd combination of meat pies, mashed potatoes and jellied eel is that many of the poor working class were Catholic Irishmen who couldn't eat the eat meat pies on Friday. Since the owners of these shops were mostly Catholics themselves, they were glad to oblige. Hence, eel to the rescue. Curiously, MacDonald's started serving fish filet sandwiches for essentially the same reason.
DominicB   
27 Mar 2020
Life / Asking cost of living in Poland [15]

I am also open to other work though, I started out in disability care so there is a few options.

So you bought a house even though you have no concrete or viable plan to support yourself, and essentially nothing to offer on the Polish job market, especially in Kielce? With three kids and a wife to support, as well? Whatever were you thinking?

You should have nailed down a steady, reliable and adequate source of income before deciding to move to Poland and buying a house there. It might be impossible now, if it ever was possible.

Sorry, but going from what you have written, I don't see much hope. Perhaps there's something you haven't written that might convince me that this is more than an utterly harebrained scheme that doomed to fail?
DominicB   
26 Mar 2020
Work / Warsaw job with US experience (tech company) [2]

What are the companies (if any) that could potentially appreciate such profile.

Probably not many, if by "appreciate" you mean providing a level of compensation that is comparable to his present employer in the US. His best chance is to get a transfer to Poland by his present employer or other Western company with no reduction in wages. Since he speaks Polish, it is more likely that a well composed request based on a realistic, well researched plan would be take seriously.

Otherwise, he will most probably have to resign himself to a deep cut in wages, or, more precisely, in savings potential. That will almost certainly dampen any enthusiasm he has for working in Poland.

One area where he could make out like a bandit is b2b sales. If he speaks both English and Polish to near native level, and he has a proven b2b earnings record, then the world is his oyster.
DominicB   
7 Feb 2020
Work / Got a Job Offer in Poland but a 3 month Visa and Probation Period concerns me [15]

Being honest Dom I am just as happy to have hard-working clever Indians here in Poland who pay their taxes

And so am I. I am not at all against immigration. Quite the opposite. I think you've misread my intentions. What I am against is the elaborate system of employment and education scams that take advantage of poor third-worlders using Poland as bait, as if it were some type of magic back door to the countries that they really want to get into. As in this case.

If you read my posts, they usually can be summarized as "If you want to get into the UK or other richer country, then don't waste your time with Poland. You'll have better luck staying at home and trying from there, with the help of your network", or "Diplomas from Polish universities for courses taught in English are almost always worthless on the international job market. If you can't afford to study in a richer country, then you're much better off studying at a good school at home than in Poland".

Truth be told though, very few Indians are interested in immigrating to Poland long term. Very few of those that come to study are interested in actually studying. Of those Indians (and other third-worlders) that do come, most are gone in a couple of years, and extremely few are left after five years. I don't blame them, though, as wages and living conditions are far, far better for Indians and other third-worlders in the UK and the other richer countries, and will remain so far into the forseeable future. So it is little wonder that they are enticed by promises of Poland being some magic backdoor and that this makes them vulnerable to scam artists.

Ask yourself this: How many of the third-worlders who post here would have any interest whatsoever in Poland if they didn't perceive it as a back door to the UK and other richer countries?
DominicB   
7 Feb 2020
Work / Got a Job Offer in Poland but a 3 month Visa and Probation Period concerns me [15]

Poland.

Sorry, but it sounds like they are hiring you for their center in India with no intention of ever transferring you to Poland. They are holding out "Poland" as a carrot to get you to take the job and work hard in hope of a reward that will never come. Doesn't sound like a company I would want to work for. It's a borderline scam, if you think of it.

Forget about Poland. It no longer offers anything that could benefit a person from India. It is difficult to get into, wages are poor, cost of living relative to wages is high, there is no Indian community to speak of, and it is not an effective "foot in the back door" to the richer countries that you really want to move to. Concentrate on finding a job in those richer countries instead of wasting time going through the back door.
DominicB   
6 Feb 2020
Work / Companies in Poland that support Work Permit [8]

He still mite an Amerycan be, but negelctful of what he writes. Not all nateev speakers praficient are in there langwegees.

No chance. There are multiple clues that he is not a native American, and not a native speaker of any variety of English, for that matter, and it's not due to neglect, but to inadequate command of a second language. No native English speaker could have made the mistakes he did. When native speakers make mistakes, they are of an entirely different sort.
DominicB   
6 Feb 2020
Work / Companies in Poland that support Work Permit [8]

@mbv747

Jobs like this are usually filled by Indian agencies that do their own recruiting. Companies in Poland rarely hire foreigners directly on their own, even for something like SAP. The only chance you have that way is if you know someone working for the company who knows of a current job vacancy that exists and can act as an intermediary. Otherwise, your just shooting blanks.

Second, demand for non-EU IT workers has dropped a lot over the past few years in Poland. It would be a waste to spend time on a job search in a country which has so few jobs to offer, at wages that are much lower compared to the US or the richer countries in the EU.

I assume you are from India or other developing country, and having a hard time getting a visa in the US. Here's a tip: try to find a job in the public or non-profit sectors. Much easier to land a visa there then for private for-profit enterprises.

Last of all, you have a lot of work to do on your English before you can even think of passing yourself off as an American, so please don't even try. It turns people off.
DominicB   
5 Feb 2020
Food / Which foods are generally disliked/unpopular in Poland? Which non-Polish foods are slowly gaining popularity? [131]

As for desire, I bet most Eastern Europeans in the Netherlands survive on exotic takeaway.

You would think, but that is not the case. I've had dozens of Polish friends and students go to work in the Netherlands, and told them specifically to try Indonesian food, particularly rijsttafel. None did. In fact, they did very little eating out at all, surviving entirely on supermarket food. Especially bread and cold cuts. They are there to make money to bring back to Poland, and eating out works against that. Even cheap takeout. Sampling the local food, whether native or exotic, is very low on the priority list.

As a foodie evangelist, I have to say that Poles are particularly difficult to convert to the foodie faith. I've had a few stunning successes, and I've met some avid Polish foodies, some from surprising quarters, but most Poles are quite reluctant to budge from their comfort zone.

Sadly, a lot of the reluctance has to do with cost. Trying an unknown food means risking that you will end up with something you don't like and have to throw away. Particularly in a restaurant setting in the West, where food is extravagantly expensive in relation to back home. Better to stick with the tried and true.
DominicB   
3 Feb 2020
Work / Is starting a language school doable in Poland [9]

Also could we make a decent living out of this?

If you had done so 25 years ago, yes. But any need of this sort has long been met, even in places like Tuchola. A lot more native Poles have learned English to the point where they can teach it at all but the most advanced levels. This reduces the need for native English speakers. And in a community that size, the market for French will be a niche one that is also probably satisfied at the moment, as well.

I would say that it is unrealistic to expect that you will be able to support yourself and your family by teaching English or opening a school nowadays. You'd have to operate quite a successful operation, and that would take years to establish. And it might be impossible to do so in a town as small as Tuchola. Until then, you would have to live on savings, hoping that one day, your investment would pay off. And probably hoping against hope.

Frankly, I think your wife's idea of moving you all to Poland is totally unworkable. It would be far more feasible to continue living and working in the UK and taking extended vacations in Poland. There is just no way that you will be able to avoid a drastic cut in earnings and savings potential if you move to Poland. And, like I said, you'd probably have to live off of savings for an indeterminate number of years. Basic math is your enemy here.
DominicB   
2 Feb 2020
Work / A predictable "Is my salary high enough post" - Krakow 13,500PLN GROSS Month [30]

but I thought emigrants drop that silliness when abroad.

Some do, most don't. Especially married women don't.

It's not only caste. The other factors I listed are also very divisive: language, ethnicity, religion, economic status, and other cultural factors. Much more so than in other countries. India is by far the most stratified and segmented society in the world.
DominicB   
2 Feb 2020
Work / A predictable "Is my salary high enough post" - Krakow 13,500PLN GROSS Month [30]

Indian women do not socialize with other Indian women unless they are of the same or compatible language/social/economic/cultural/relgious background. Caste is very important. So the pool of compatible native women in Poland who she can befriend is very limited, and maybe even zero.
DominicB   
2 Feb 2020
Food / Which foods are generally disliked/unpopular in Poland? Which non-Polish foods are slowly gaining popularity? [131]

Most of the people who live in Poland bordering the Baltic Sea have no history of living near the sea at all. They were resettled there after WWII, mostly from former Polish territories now in Belarus and the Ukraine. Before the war, Poland only had a tiny stretch of seacoast near Gdańsk.

goat meat

Completely unavailable and unknown. Unlikely that you could get most Poles to even try it. Even beef consumption is limited. Much, much less popular than pork, which makes up 90% or more of non-poultry meat consumption.

As others have said, younger people are more adventurous and curious, especially those who have worked or vacationed abroad, or those who live in cities. The comparison to the UK or the US in the fifties is not quite right. More like the seventies or eighties, before the foodie revolution really took off.

Do you mean cząber? It's always been available or do you mean szałwia?

Szałwia.

But what kind of aromatic fish do you mean coz I can`t recall any now?

Parsing mistake. That should be: (Aromatic cheese) and (fish with a fuller flavor).
DominicB   
1 Feb 2020
Food / Which foods are generally disliked/unpopular in Poland? Which non-Polish foods are slowly gaining popularity? [131]

@NieNazwany

As far as lamb goes, most Poles have never tasted it. While the country does produce some lamb meat, it is overwhelming destined for export. You'll encounter it in upscale restaurants, and rarely anywhere else. The Poles that I know who did try lamb mostly found the taste disagreeable, specifically a bit "rotten". And I'm talking about very young lamb, not mutton. Lamb marketers have a tough row to hoe in Poland.

Other big dislikes are any cheese or any fish except for the very blandest varieties. So bland that you have a hard time telling one variety or species apart from another. Aromatic cheeses or fish with a fuller flavor physically disgust them, except herring and smoked mackerel.

Sage and licorice are taboo, too. Both provoke violent retching. Even the mildest forms of licorice. You see do see sage in the spice section in the store, but beats me who buys it.
DominicB   
29 Jan 2020
Work / A predictable "Is my salary high enough post" - Krakow 13,500PLN GROSS Month [30]

how much is 1.85 lakh?

A little more than 10,000 PLN. Twice as much pay sounds great, until you realize that the cost of living for an Indian expat with wife and school age kid in Poland are going to be a lot more than twice the cost of living for an Indian native living in India. It's also going to be a good bit more than for a native Pole with a wife and school are kid living in Poland.

Things to take into account:

Expenses related to travel and relocation. Not only tickets, but visas, days of from work to travel to embassies, etc, all add up. If he stays in India, this expense is, of course, zero. Depends on whether he gets a relocation bonus or not, and how generous it is.

Loss of home court advantage. A Pole can live a lot cheaper in Poland than an foreigner, who doesn't speak the language, know how the "system" works, or have a network of family and friends.

Tuition for the child. That's going to cost a whole heap. ISK costs 60,000 PLN a year. That's 5000 PLN a month, each and every month of the year. He might opt for something cheaper, but that would probably represent a huge drop in quality compared to what he is currently getting in India. That drop in value has to be figured in as a cost.

Travel back home. Going to visit the folks and the in-laws will cost a LOT more than it would had he stayed in India. A funeral or wedding or two can wipe out any savings.

Keeping the wife occupied. In India, she has friends of her own ethnic/language/social group who she can socialize with. It's going to be hard if not impossible for her to find anyone in Poland. He will have to keep her occupied somehow from going stir crazy, and that's going to cost something.

Job networking. It's tempting to think that, being in Poland, an Indian would find it easier to break into the job market of the richer Western countries. It's probably harder, though, because back home, he has, or should have, an extensive network of colleagues who have worked in the West or even are working there right now. Poland doesn't make as much sense as a "stepping stone".
DominicB   
29 Jan 2020
Work / A predictable "Is my salary high enough post" - Krakow 13,500PLN GROSS Month [30]

@Ziemowit

The massive influx of Ukrainians, in the last five, six years for one. Ukrainians are less hassle to hire than Indians. And, of course, the practical disappearance of questions about jobs in Poland from Indians on this and other forums. And the added difficulty for Indians to get a work visa to Poland. 90% or more of the questions Indians ask on forums nowadays are directly related to the difficulty associated with getting a visa. It's really difficult for the to get even a appointment at the embassy. Companies are less motivated to help because they can always hire a Ukrainian instead.

Also, I suspect a good bit of the earlier employment of Indians in Poland was on the shady side, or at least not as promised, and it certainly spawned many, many employment and immigration scams. I think that Indians have caught on about that, too. And also to the fact that working in Poland doesn't really help get a job in the UK or other richer countries than staying in India would.
DominicB   
29 Jan 2020
Work / Gross Salary 20000 PLN in Poland [9]

21K PLN is a lof of money

So is 1.85 lakh. With cost of living and cost of schooling for the child taken into account, he may be better off staying in India.

s it worth moving to Krakow

Probably not. Your chances for advancement are probably higher using India as a base than using Poland as a "foot in the door" to the richer countries of the EU. Living in Poland will probably not increase your chances of finding work in a richer country that is more receptive to Indians. As for staying in Poland long term, very few Indians do. By far the overwhelming majority either move west, legally or illegally, or return home within a few years at most.

Also, Poland has become a less attractive destination for Indians, and Indians have become less attractive employees to Polish companies over the last five years. This forum hardly ever gets questions like yours anymore, whereas five, ten years ago it got several a week. The golden age for Indian workers in Poland is long past.
DominicB   
29 Jan 2020
Work / A predictable "Is my salary high enough post" - Krakow 13,500PLN GROSS Month [30]

21K PLN is a lof of money

So is 1.85 lakh. With cost of living and cost of schooling for the child taken into account, he may be better off staying in India, at least as far as quality of life is concerned, especially the quality of life of his wife and child.

Is it worth moving to Krakow

Probably not. Your chances for advancement are probably higher using India as a base than using Poland as a "foot in the door" to the richer countries of the EU. Living in Poland will probably not increase your chances of finding work in a richer country that is more receptive to Indians. As for staying in Poland long term, very few Indians do. By far the overwhelming majority either move west, legally or illegally, or return home within a few years at most.

Also, Poland has become a less attractive destination for Indians, and Indians have become less attractive employees to Polish companies over the last five years. This forum hardly ever gets questions like yours anymore, whereas five, ten years ago it got several a week. The golden age for Indian workers in Poland is long past.
DominicB   
6 Jan 2020
Work / Certified TEFL Teacher jobs in Poland [2]

How is the job situation in poland for Non EU members who want to work at language schools to teach English?

Practically non-existent. Forget about it, that ship sailed years ago. Any need can be met with EU-nationals and permanent residents, and wages have stagnated to the point where they are not at all attractive. You might not even break even. The situation is essentially the same everywhere in the EU. If there are any green pastures for TEFL teachers, the are in Asia, especially the richer Arabic countries.
DominicB   
28 Dec 2019
Real Estate / Home loan in Poland based on my US credit score? [15]

I dont think States is a cushy country,it is very competitive here.

Compared to Poland, it's very, very cushy. The opportunities you have to improve and advance yourself are enormous, IF you are willing to get off your duff and do the work.

If you are poor in the States, if they are working at McD for a living rather than for extra cash, it's almost always because you find being poor more attractive than actually putting in the work to improve your saleable skills. Dollars to doughnuts, that's the case with the OP.
DominicB   
28 Dec 2019
Real Estate / Home loan in Poland based on my US credit score? [15]

I don't understand how person who cant earn a decent living in the USA thinks it will be easier in a foreign country?

Desperation. The only thing keep them from putting their head in the oven is the faint hopeful fantasy that someone, somewhere must think that they are worth something. It's like buying a lottery ticket with your last buck and then fantasizing what you will do with the winnings.

@Iwrite4Food

Poland isn't kind to silly dreamers, kid. It will chew you up and $hit you out without a moment's hesitation. It's not Fantasy Island, where Ricardo Montalban magically grants you your every silly wish.

If you can't make it in an extremely cushy country like the States, then you aren't going to make it anywhere else, either.
DominicB   
28 Dec 2019
Real Estate / Home loan in Poland based on my US credit score? [15]

Technically this is exactly what I intend to do. I would come in with 20% cash (or thereabouts) of the total cost of the loan.

Nobody would ever give you a loan. You have no reliable source of income as far as a bank in Poland is concerned. Nobody would give you a loan in the States, either.

Really, you are not going to solve any problems by moving to Poland. You don't have a plan, or anything even resembling a realistic clue about how life in Poland operates, and, since you're mind is hopelessly clouded by desperation, you never will. If you were to move to Poland, or any other country, you would definitely fail and lose what little you have.

If you want to improve your lot, forget about writing and get a real job. School up for a real career.

As the great writer Robert Heinlein wrote: TANSTAAFL. There ain't no such think as a free lunch. And that's doubly true for Poland. If you want to eat, you gotta work. And work doesn't mean sitting around all day on your fat a$$ pretending you are a "writer".

Talk to a responsible adult ASAP because your life is going down the $hitter fast. You need a massive dose of reality ("I need at least a 110 m2 two bedroom apartment in an attractive location, but I'm on Medicaid" - spewed my cornflakes laughing at that one)

Snap out of it, kid. Your dream isn't going to come true. In Poland or elsewhere. Unless you do some actual work.
DominicB   
24 Dec 2019
Law / Is it possible to work with the same work permit on a different jobs in Poland? [24]

@Decubic

First of all, a work permit is not something you can get. It is something your employer gets. It is permission for them to hire you. It is not permission for you to work anywhere except for that employer.

So if you want to change jobs or do a second job, your new employer will have to apply for a separate work permit to hire you.

No employer in Poland is going to apply for a work permit to hire someone from India. And even if they tried, they would never get it. There is no need for mechanics from outside of the EU in Poland.

You're stuck with IT, and with the employer that first hired you.