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Moved back from Canada to Poland:). Here are the reasons why.


aphrodisiac 11 | 2,444
24 Sep 2010 #1
well, as some of you might know, I have moved back to Poland from Canada.

As much as I liked Canada, I still wanted to move back to Europe.

Day One:
Landed in Berlin on Wed afternoon and got picked up by my brother in law. We were in Szczecin within 2,5 hours due to the traffic in Germany. I was getting quite hungary, but decided to have a meal in Poland.

Finally, after crossing the border we decided to stop at the gas station, so I could have something to eat. We we waiting for 5 minutes since there was nobody at the counter, yet I head some voices in the kitchen. There is hope that I would be fed soon- I though to myself.

I ordered "flaczki" and we went off towards Szczecin.
The weather was sunny and I finally arrived in front of my apartment. The suitcases were heavy, but we managed to carry them all the way to the 3rd floor (no elevator).

2. Day Two:
After waking up at 3 am and unpacking some of the stuff I went back to bed, woke up at 11, did some shopping (nice Pani at the counter) went to get some info about the internet connection- they said that it would be installed the next day. Went to the job interview, but the person was late, so I lost some time there. It seems that Polish people like to make you wait, especially the future bosses. Oh, well. In the meantime I managed to find out about the cell phone rates, so it wasn't so bad after all.

3. Day 3
I was suppose to get hooked to the internet today between 9-11 am. Guess what? At 9:05 two young guys came in and within 10 minutes it was all done!!!!!

Next thing: setting up my own business: dzialalnosc gospodarcza, well I will report how it went after I am done. Off to Urzad Miejski. Please pray for me, because even though I am patient, I know how those ladies are.

Lets hope it would not be so bad.

PS. The weather in Szczecin is splendid. Sunny and around 20 C, not to mention the full moon at night.

TBC
Wroclaw Boy
24 Sep 2010 #2
As much as I liked Canada, I still wanted to move back to Europe.

Interesting, if you don't mind me asking what were your main reasons for coming back?

We we waiting for 5 minutes since there was nobody at the counter, yet I head some voices in the kitchen.

Easy tiger.
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
24 Sep 2010 #3
Welcome back to the old world, glad to hear you are hitting the ground running.

The weather in Szczecin is splendid. Sunny and around 20 C, not to mention the full moon at night.

It really is wonderfully beautiful these days and the leaves are changing colour.
OP aphrodisiac 11 | 2,444
24 Sep 2010 #4
Interesting, if you don't mind me asking what were your main reasons for coming back?

ill father was the main reason, second, I will be closer to Europe and Berlin in particular, which I love. Thirdly, I own a place in Szczecin, so it was easy, and more job opportunities for me here.

Easy tiger.

I am very patient so far;)

Welcome back to the old world, glad to hear you are hitting the ground running.

thanks Sean, it feels good to be back:)

It really is wonderfully beautiful these days and the leaves are changing colour.

yes, it is, however no leaves changing colour here yet. Is it because I am north from you? That does not make sense, the more north the faster the change, at least in Canada;(.
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
24 Sep 2010 #5
however no leaves changing colour here yet. Is it because I am north from you? That does not make sense, the more north the faster the change, at least in Canada;(.

Your in Europe now, we don't use "Canadian" logic here :)

Ah, they have just started to change colour up the mountains here, maybe it's due to altitude not latitude.
poland_
24 Sep 2010 #6
I will be closer to Europe and Berlin in particular, which I love. Thirdly, I own a place in Szczecin, so it was easy, and more job opportunities for me here

I am told very often, by Poles returning to Poland, that their motivation is "more opportunity in Poland", it seem to be quite the opposite, for many Brits returning to the UK who cite "lack of opportunity in Poland" as their motivation to leave Poland. I am a believer that if you dig deep enough, you will find the worm. So on that note I wish you success in your new start.
Borrka 37 | 594
24 Sep 2010 #7
"more opportunity in Poland"

But only for Poles which are used to local ... hmm ... conditions.
Returning (in the 90-ties) was probaly the best decision of my life and quite a challenge.

However my dream job would be "Vive la mort, vive la guerre, vive le sacre mercenaire." LOL
delphiandomine 83 | 17,730
24 Sep 2010 #8
I am told very often, by Poles returning to Poland, that their motivation is "more opportunity in Poland", it seem to be quite the opposite, for many Brits returning to the UK who cite "lack of opportunity in Poland" as their motivation to leave Poland.

That's because many Brits can't speak the language, so there isn't much opportunity for them.

Certainly in Poland, it's still a much more open market than the UK - I think WB was saying how there are vast areas of untapped potential here - along with easy access to Eastern markets.
poland_
24 Sep 2010 #9
But only for Poles which are used to local ... hmm ... conditions.

You would expect non-locals, to do enough R n' D to understand what they are getting involved in.

That's because many Brits can't speak the language, so there isn't much opportunity for them.

If you do not speak Polish, then you have a communication problem, so expect to pay the premium. IMO it's deeper than that, many non-locals turn up in Poland with the idea of changing Poland from the outside, it is much easier to find your opportunity within.
convex 20 | 3,978
24 Sep 2010 #10
If you do not speak Polish, then you have a communication problem, so expect to pay the premium. IMO it's deeper than that, many non-locals turn up in Poland with the idea of changing Poland from the outside, it is much easier to find your opportunity within.

It's easy, either import an idea or better business/marketing practices, that buys you a bit of time to learn. Foreigners won't make money here unless they're innovative enough to offset their competitive disadvantages.
Wroclaw Boy
24 Sep 2010 #11
IMO it's deeper than that, many non-locals turn up in Poland with the idea of changing Poland from the outside,

I assume you mean taking a tried and tested idea from abroad and introducing to Poland? That has been my approach and still is.

it is much easier to find your opportunity within.

Cant really think of anything for Brits other than teaching English or starting a business.
delphiandomine 83 | 17,730
24 Sep 2010 #12
Cant really think of anything for Brits other than teaching English or starting a business.

There are decent jobs going for those who have something to bring to the table - I know a few companies in Poznan who hire Brits (on local salaries, not expat salaries) if they have the right experience in the right places.

The smart people I know here all started off teaching English and used that to build contacts - and some of them are now doing very well for themselves.
poland_
24 Sep 2010 #13
I think WB was saying how there are vast areas of untapped potential here - along with easy access to Eastern markets.

I agree with WB, there is untapped potential east.

Foreigners won't make money here unless they're innovative enough to offset their competitive disadvantages.

Fair point

The smart people I know here all started off teaching English and used that to build contacts - and some of them are now doing very well for themselves.

From small acorns grow large oak trees.

I assume you mean taking a tried and tested idea from abroad and introducing to Poland? That has been my approach and still is.

Not everything that works outside of Poland, will have the same market penetration here unless you have very deep pockets. IMO, today Poles are looking for something that is cheaper and better or makes life easier. The new has very much been done, as most products and services are already on the market in some capacity.

IMO, if you adopt the cultural and social habits that are deeply rooted in the nation, it is easier to assimilate and find your position within polish society.
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
24 Sep 2010 #14
A good English pub or fish&chips shop should go over well in Poland. There still aren't that many, are there?
Harry
24 Sep 2010 #15
The English pubs in Poland have mainly gone bankrupt (although I'm pretty sure that there is still one in Gdynia). The chip shop in Warsaw seems to be doing fairly well but a lot of that is due to the expat customers (and the good business sense of the owner).
convex 20 | 3,978
24 Sep 2010 #16
A good English pub or fish&chips shop should go over well in Poland. There still aren't that many, are there?

Funny you should mention that. Just on the note of business acumen, there has been a space here (50m2) that has been occupied by five different little eateries over the last two years. Always the same thing, Polish food that doesn't transport very well or gyros. The problem of course, is that there are three other larger gyros places within 25m walking distance. Why on earth would you open another one on a side street? I'm heading down there later to ask the guys who run the place what they're thinking, I can't see it staying around for too long. Even crappy fish and chips would give you some kind of advantage over crappy gyros.
Wroclaw Boy
24 Sep 2010 #17
A good English pub or fish&chips shop should go over well in Poland. There still aren't that many, are there?

Theres just not enough disposable income for either of those to really succeed at the moment. There are so many fantastic restaurants throughout Poland and most of them are often empty, same for pubs and bars.

I have some ideas at the moment, things which Poles really need and will pay for. Hopefully that Porsche 911 will not be to far away.

crappy gyros.

I tried some Gyros again the other day from a Greek joint, it looks so nice on the spit, and yep i still hate it. Whats the deal with Gyros quality in PL? Its disgusting.

Keeping with restaurants Novocaine in Wroclaw Rynek does a storming trade and rightly so those pizzas are amazing. Straight outta Rome.
poland_
24 Sep 2010 #18
the good business sense of the owner.

Customer service - the staff are always friendly and informative of new products. The owner will go out of his way to bring food products from the UK for you. A big thumbs up.

Here is the link
fishandchips.pl/index.php/en/health
convex 20 | 3,978
24 Sep 2010 #19
Keeping with restaurants Novocaine in Wroclaw Rynek does a storming trade and rightly so those pizzas are amazing. Straight outta Rome.

It seems like there is some sort of aversion to actually seasoning or marinating the meat. Even the factory made minced meat skewers are all wrong...would it hurt to throw a tomato on the top of the skewer to keep from feeling like you're eating cardboard?

Novocaina is awesome. The interior is amazing as well....but, with that location and the money they dumped into it, the only thing keeping it above water is the club. I think without that cash cow underneath it, they would have long since closed up shop.
sledz 23 | 2,250
24 Sep 2010 #20
setting up my own business: dzialalnosc gospodarcza, w

Good luck to you and you future endeavors:)

I tried some Gyros again the other day from a Greek joint, it looks so nice on the spit, and yep i still hate it. Whats the deal with Gyros quality in PL? Its disgusting.

We have gyros here in Chicago, they are delicious!
They wage havoc on you breath for a day though, but they are good!
Every time Ive mentioned gyros before on PF people think I am talking about kabobs,
which I say are disgusting.
Patrycja19 63 | 2,700
24 Sep 2010 #21
ill father was the main reason,

I am so sorry, take it one day at a time and spend as much time as you can.

[quote=aphrodisiac]I will be closer to Europe and Berlin in particular, which I love. Thirdly, I own a place in Szczecin, so it was easy, and more job opportunities for me here.

I am glad that you have opportunities, especially in this economy. Wish you all the best
;)
convex 20 | 3,978
24 Sep 2010 #22
Every time Ive mentioned gyros before on PF people think I am talking about kabobs,
which I say are disgusting.

You like pork more than lamb?
pgtx 29 | 3,159
24 Sep 2010 #23
good luck aphro! keep us posted! :)

and eat lots of flaczki! it's good for you ;)
jwojcie 2 | 763
25 Sep 2010 #24
Whats the deal with Gyros quality in PL? Its disgusting.

I hate those Gyros bastards, they've killed good old Wroclaw's Knysza...
southern 75 | 7,096
25 Sep 2010 #25
Gyros depends very much on the joint making it.The same is true for souvlaki.Gyros cannot succeed in Poland in my opinion because Poles have different taste and are not accustomed to mediteranean cuisine.If sb wants gyros to succeed in Poland he has to add some sour flavour to it like these prepared polish ogurki and stuff in vinegrad in bottles.Poles do not like physical mediteranean tastes till they get accustomed to that.
rychlik 41 | 373
25 Sep 2010 #26
How are your Polish skills? I'd love to start a photography business in Poland.
poland_
25 Sep 2010 #27
Gyros depends very much on the joint making it

I agree with you southern,Gyros and kebabs are such health hazards in poland, that they should have a special health and safety group policing them, I have never eaten gyros, unfortunately twice kebab in poland. This is not food for me.
Ironside 48 | 9,841
25 Sep 2010 #28
As much as I liked Canada, I still wanted to move back to Europe.

why not Ukraine ?

take it easy - only kidding - good luck!
ShawnH 8 | 1,498
25 Sep 2010 #29
Next time I land in PL, I expect to see a chain of Timmies in every highway rest area ;-)

All the best.
Chicago Pollock 7 | 504
25 Sep 2010 #30
Not everything that works outside of Poland, will have the same market penetration here unless you have very deep pockets. IMO, today Poles are looking for something that is cheaper and better or makes life easier. The new has very much been done, as most products and services are already on the market in some capacity.

There's always a market for something well done no matter were you're at. Just a little creative thinking and patience.

IMO, if you adopt the cultural and social habits that are deeply rooted in the nation, it is easier to assimilate and find your position within polish society.

Very true, but got to speak the lingo.

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