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Moved back from Canada to Poland:). Here are the reasons why.


Ironside 48 | 9,913
11 Oct 2010 #151
Poles are scared shiteless of drafts.

hey drafts are not good for you, you know!
OP aphrodisiac 11 | 2,444
11 Oct 2010 #152
You made me laugh

it wasn't a laughing matter for me because this time around the compartment was full and all 8 of us were being nicely and slowly cooked and I felt like an overcooked sardine. I was so happy once I got out of the train and could take some fresh air in.

Oh, the train doors are so difficult to open then I usually have to step away and let the Polish man open them for me. I don't even know why I am trying, since I always fail.

Nothing like driving around in +30 with all the windows closed and no air conditioning. Poles are scared shiteless of drafts.

no kidding, Poles really like inclosed spaces.

hey drafts are not good for you, you know!

old wife's tale. You need to air cars, trains and houses out every so often. Air in not gonna kill you:).

More to report later since I have been running around like a chicken without head today.

Had a class in the morning and the students were great. One of them was not happy with the service for some strange reason, but I managed to calm her down and got on her good side by making her busy with the lesson. She left the school very happy. I praised the group since they were hard working and very willing to learn.
southern 75 | 7,096
11 Oct 2010 #153
Oh, the train doors are so difficult to open then I usually have to step away and let the Polish man open them for me

What do you give the man?
OP aphrodisiac 11 | 2,444
12 Oct 2010 #154
nothing, they do it out of habit, which I like.
Chicago Pollock 7 | 504
12 Oct 2010 #155
Poles are scared shiteless of drafts.

And the English are fresh air fiends. Me wife always opens the bedroom window. Bloody Hell.
scottie1113 7 | 898
12 Oct 2010 #156
And the English are fresh air fiends.

So is this American. My bedroom window is always open a little, even in winter. It makes for better sleeping.
OP aphrodisiac 11 | 2,444
13 Oct 2010 #157
ZUS.

I have to say that the institution and the way it functions improved quite a LOT. One does not have to wait in lines anymore and the stuff is more cooperative.

I actually went to hand in the form and after 10 minutes I walked out with all the forms (stamped) in my hand, so I don't have to go to ZUS anymore.

From now on my accountant will take care of the rest and I was told that all I have to do is to PAY my monthly contributions.

Urzad Skarbowy will be taken care of by my accountant too, so after some running around during the first week it looks like I will have less to complain then I initially was planning to.

I am almost dissapointed, but in a good way since setting up a business (dzialalnosc gospodarcza) was easier then I thought.

So all I have to do now is to work, make money and enjoy my life a little bit more, then during the first 2 weeks.

The weather is still splendid in Szczecin and it is sunny most of the day. I have most things under control.
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,884
13 Oct 2010 #158
aphrodisiac wrote:

ZUS.

I have to say that the institution and the way it functions improved quite a LOT.

how long were you in Canada before you moved back to Poland? how old were you when you moved to Canada?

aphrodisiac wrote:

The weather is still splendid in Szczecin and it is sunny most of the day. I have most things under control.

1:32 p.m. in Wroclaw, 7 degrees C and no sun, just like yesterday. weather in Szczecin today.....high of 9 degrees C, 82% humidity.

you TRULY have low standards for weather.
OP aphrodisiac 11 | 2,444
13 Oct 2010 #159
how long were you in Canada before you moved back to Poland? how old were you when you moved to Canada?

I was in Canada for 8 years. I used to run dzialalnosc gospodarcza before I left therefore I can compare how it was 8 years ago to how things function now. How old was I when I moved back to Canada? Old enough to buy cigarettes and beer;)

1:32 p.m. in Wroclaw, 7 degrees C and no sun, just like yesterday. weather in Szczecin today.....high of 9 degrees C, 82% humidity.

well, it is dry, it is warm enough for me to wear a light jacket and last night at around 9 o'clock pm I was walking in a sweater, but I spent 8 really cold and LONG winters there, so I guess I do have low standard for the weather;), he, he.......sue me for enjoying the Polish weather. Usually at this time of the year it is rainy, dark and cold in Szczecin, so I am happy. Sue me for being happy with what I got;). After all we don't live in tropics, do we? Lack of sun in Wroclaw makes you a nag;)
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,884
13 Oct 2010 #160
aphrodisiac wrote:

Lack of sun in Wroclaw makes you a nag;)

YES
convex 20 | 3,978
13 Oct 2010 #161
Lack of sun in Wroclaw makes you a nag

Oh, I can see it, there's a hole...I see the sun right now! After 48 hours of darkness, the miracles of aphro!

edit...it's gone again :(
OP aphrodisiac 11 | 2,444
13 Oct 2010 #162
YES

well, I feel for you and I know from experience(grew up in Poland) how miserable one feels in the Polish fall weather without sun. I used to go to a suntanning salon in the past and it seemed to help. Maybe you have SAD? I know I do, that is why I am very happy when it is sunny.

Oh, I can see it, there's a hole...I see the sun right now! After 48 hours of darkness, the miracles of aphro!

There you go:)
well, maybe you should move to Szczecin then. It has been sunny most of the time since I arrived here and that has been 3 weeks now. I don't like this grey, overcast, musty Polish weather either.
convex 20 | 3,978
13 Oct 2010 #163
well, maybe you should move to Szczecin then.

One better, moving to Croatia in two months.
OP aphrodisiac 11 | 2,444
13 Oct 2010 #164
that sounds much warmer already and a little more fun:) Good choice. Somehow that news took a dash of wind out of my sails:). How long have you been in Poland?
convex 20 | 3,978
13 Oct 2010 #165
Two years this month on this stint, lived in Prague for a good long while before that.

Croatia will be for a couple of months, then leaving the continent altogether (tiny world, might as well explore it).
OP aphrodisiac 11 | 2,444
13 Oct 2010 #166
ah, so you are a globetrotter then. Good luck:)
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,884
13 Oct 2010 #167
aphrodisiac wrote:

well, maybe you should move to Szczecin then.

now there's a solution. truly all of europe envies the weather in Szczecin, Poland, especially October-April.

convex wrote:

One better, moving to Croatia in two months.

wise choice. i'll be outta here shortly after you, ducking most of the Polish winter. My wife and I have completely had it with Poland's weather and are off to somewhere with basically no winter.
A J 4 | 1,088
13 Oct 2010 #168
Well, it sure sounds like you've found your way home already!

:)
OP aphrodisiac 11 | 2,444
14 Oct 2010 #169
wise choice. i'll be outta here shortly after you, ducking most of the Polish winter. My wife and I have completely had it with Poland's weather and are off to somewhere with basically no winter.

good for you. Does it mean no nagging from you in the future?

Well, it sure sounds like you've found your way home already!

:)

yes, some glitches along the way as one would expect when moving countries, but I think I have most things under control:).

Polish obsessions
aka passions.
Matches
Polish have obsession with matches, which are still used here. One can buy them anywhere. Sometimes when I use them they produce a little explosion - scary stuff, but this is about as exciting as it gets.

Tiles
If Pole could tile the whole country, he would. Honestly, they are everywhere: all the way to the ceiling in washrooms, on floors, in schools, in government offices (well, in some). Outdoor tiles and indoor tiles are very common here.

Boot
Did I mention boots?
I finally gave up my battle with them. There is no use. I might try high heels in a week or so, but at the moment I am not ready for such an experiment. To sore from walking in boots.

Mutts
there is large number of dogs in my area (including the famous Yorkie in a pink sweater on cold days with a pony tail), but I don't see them being walked for a long time. Owners take them out for a short spin and after that they are back indoors. In general, dogs are very popular.

In Canada there is an informal Association of Dog Owners in parks and if one does not own a dog, there is a fat chance that they will socialize or even talk to you, unless one gets chased by a dog, but that happens very rarely. Most dogs in Canada attend some classes and training, but I guess the fines are too steep to run the risk.
Torq 26 | 2,371
15 Oct 2010 #170
I might try high hills in a week

High hills are nice...

...but I prefer high heels...

;)
OP aphrodisiac 11 | 2,444
15 Oct 2010 #171
;)

not these for sure;)

No hills in Szczecin, well maybe around the area.
Teffle 22 | 1,321
15 Oct 2010 #172
Polish have obsession with matches, which are still used here. One can buy them anywhere. Sometimes when I use them they produce a little explosion - scary stuff

??

What do you mean "still used" ?

Are matches illegal in Canada or something?!

; )
OP aphrodisiac 11 | 2,444
15 Oct 2010 #173
Are matches illegal in Canada or something?!

Highly;)
hardly anybody uses matches, since most of the stoves are electric and lighters are the most popular.

Do they still use matches in Ireland?
Teffle 22 | 1,321
15 Oct 2010 #174
Do they still use matches in Ireland?

Well yeah.

I mean, you generally won't see people lighting their cigs with them and they aren't required for stoves etc but you can certainly buy them kind of everywhere.

I suppose those that don't smoke and who have an open fire would buy them regularly enough. Probably for lighting candles too.

In fact come to think of it, there aren't that many good reasons for buying them but it's not that they are some sort of relic from history either.

I love the way you are scared by the little explosion by the way - LOL!

"What manner of bizarre, dangerous incendiary device is this?"
OP aphrodisiac 11 | 2,444
17 Oct 2010 #175
"What manner of bizarre, dangerous incendiary device is this?"

not that I am not used to them, but often they are dangerous.
Polish weather

It appears that Fuzzy's prayers have been answered for Szczecin to experience some bad Polish weather. It was raining yesterday all day (for the second time in 3 weeks) and it was really cold and windy. Regardless, I had to do errands, so on my stop over at my cousin, I gulped down 1 cup of tea and 1 cup of coffee, followed by a handful of nuts I have given to him 2 weeks ago (well, I left him some) and then followed by a bowl of pyzy. I felt much better and together we went to look for a washing machine for my place. After much deliberation ( I will be stuck with the machine for a number of years), looking at the futures/sizes and so on ( I am glad to report that smaller sizes are now available, besides the large and bulky ones) it looks like I will be a happy owner of the hi tech/ modern looking European design thingy.

I am sure some of you might wonder how I managed without one until now;). That will forever remain a secret;).

Now you have to excuse me, but I need to check if I brought the long jones with me, since even though it is dry today, the temperature outside seem to be quite low.

I am sure Fuzzy has all the numbers;)

anywho: gotta dash, another visit today.
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
17 Oct 2010 #176
I am curious aphrodisiac, when did you leave Poland and what, if any, changes do you notice from then compared to now?
OP aphrodisiac 11 | 2,444
19 Oct 2010 #177
in 2002.
I haven't been here long enough to analyze what changes took place, but here are some:
- paper work to set the business up was much easier to collect, since the service in ZUS, Urzad Miejski is a bit more organized. I have not been to Urzad Skarbowy since my accountant is taking care of that.

- when I was setting up my bank account there was def MORE papers to sign then in the past
- in comparison to Canada, people here are checked and not trusted by the government in a sense that everybody is a potential law breaker, therefore the bank, ZUS<Urzad Miejski and so on are there to curb the citizens form doing that - we all know how it works in the end: people will look for loopholes when there is too much control, so in that regard not much changed IMO.

People who suppose to generate business spend too much time on paper work.
-generally there are more expensive cars and better dressed people on the streets
- in my area, there were many apartment/flats built and the standard that was much higher then in the past
- many buildings have been renovated in my area
-overall cost of living is much higher then it was 8 years ago (probably 1/3): I looked at my bills from the past and I see it on regular basis when I shop, however the wages did not go up that much, so: it is more expensive in Poland and people have to work more hours in order to live comfortably

- many stores, shops, bookstores have gone out of business, therefore I have to look for new ones, while the number of foreign banks have increased

- high taxes, or generally high costs of running a business : ZUS, Tax, VAT have not decreased, which stales the businesses
- however ZUS has a 2 year discount (50%) for people who are staring a business or who haven't been running a business for the last 5 years- so what happens is the employers have already found a loophole and re- hire their workers and independant in order to lower the costs.

Generally: ZUS and taxes curb the progress, among other things and that was the situation 8 years ago, so some small changes have been implemented, but not enough.

The weather: still sunny but chilly. No rain and I am getting used to walking a lot.

Complaning
I noticed that Poles complain a lot and are never happy with what they have. Perhaps they just like to vent which actually keeps them mentally healthier.
jwojcie 2 | 763
21 Oct 2010 #178
I noticed that Poles complain a lot and are never happy with what they have. Perhaps they just like to vent which actually keeps them mentally healthier.

True, Poles complain a lot, but take into account that we are entering the most depressing time of a year.... Anyway, everyone who complain that Poles complain is not any better ;)
OP aphrodisiac 11 | 2,444
22 Oct 2010 #179
but take into account that we are entering the most depressing time of a year..

Poland is not the only country with rain and winter, Canada comes to mind with -20 C and with the windshield up to -30 C depending on the day. Norway is way up north and has one of the darkest winters, so if Poles complain about the depressing times, it makes me laugh to be honest.

Anyway, everyone who complain that Poles complain is not any better ;)

I am not complaining, I am making an observation. I already learnt that I cannot criticize Poles, they just like to be miserable on their own;), since it is their national sport. You have noticed in my post that I also saw a good side to complaining.

Paper, documents, signatures

Well, I shipped lots of my personal stuff by ship and boy or boy, it was difficult to prove to the customs that I resided in Canada so I would be exempted from paying the duty. So they paper trail has started about two weeks ago since I had to prove that I actually lived there, since owning a Canadian passport was NOT enough, among other things. I engaged 2 people in Canada and 4 people in Poland to help me sort things out and finally after sending all kinds of strange documents (rental invoices, uni records) the custom officers in Poland (had to do a translation of some of the documents since their English was "useless") I finally got OK.

Observations:
- everything has to be hard copy and Poland is far behind with that
- I should have gotten a letter from the Polish consulate stating that I indeed resided in Canada since the Canadian government is not to be trusted

- I know WHY Poland is developing so slowly: they LOVE paper documents and think that every citizen is a potential criminal trying to cheat the Polish government, while the truth is that it is the Polish government which robs Polish people of too much taxes and does not provide them with enough reliable services.

- I made so many phone calls to the Custom agency that I actually made a friend in Gdynia Port by now and even though he put me through HELL, he was nice about it lol

Anyways, I got tired of the whole affair and I would never set up export- import business in Poland - so my hats off to those who actually have;).

Tonight I am attending an art show opening. Will mix with the artsy part of Polish society;). I hope they have some wine and cheese for an always hungry art lover like me;)
jwojcie 2 | 763
22 Oct 2010 #180
Poland is not the only country with rain and winter, Canada comes to mind with -20 C and with the windshield up to -30 C depending on the day.

If you familiar with "Northern Exposure" series then there was an episod where they were using in the winter small hats with a light bulb shining directly onto user heads, I think many Poles should use that ;)

As for Scandinavians they supposedly drink even more than Poles in winter times... ;)
On more serious note Spanish friend of my friend had to give up in autumn an went to Spain exactly because of autumn/winter depression...

I am not complaining, I am making an observation. I already learnt that I cannot criticize Poles

Oh come on, that was a joke... though I encountered many times people complaing about complaing for at least an hour...

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