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Moved back from Canada to Poland:). Here are the reasons why.


Meathead 5 | 473
30 Oct 2012 #841
Yeah, I was raised in a Polish household also. I had to move and make an effort to Americanize, which I did. Now I can laugh...at myself.
rybnik 18 | 1,461
30 Oct 2012 #842
Now I can laugh...at myself.

Congratulations!
That's an acheivement in and of itself.
It took me many years of marriage to my Filipina to lunlearn my old ways and to learn how to laugh at myself and generally to lighten up!

Up until then I would take everything, including myself, so seriously.
It's such a relief.
OP aphrodisiac 11 | 2,441
13 Dec 2012 #843
there is nothing to read on PF these days, just saying:(.

Polo took over most of the topics and with his rabid hate for everything removed from real life, he made this forum dead.
Or, most people are busy x-mas shopping, so Polo has been left to guard the post.
pdangelo4 2 | 3
13 Dec 2012 #844
Ya I see more and more people moving back to Poland with the way the economy is going. Also for me it was so much easier and cheaper to start a business here than it would have been back in the states..
1jola 14 | 1,879
13 Dec 2012 #845
Polo took over most of the topics

Oh, Afro, you're free to start a topic at any time.

Ya I see more and more people moving back to Poland with the way the economy is going

Polish economy is really booming right about now, ain't it?

Also for me it was so much easier and cheaper to start a business here than it would have been back in the states..

I'm sure that's humorous news to everybody reading this. Could you compare tax rates for those of us not in business? Thanks.
berni23 7 | 379
13 Dec 2012 #846
Polish economy is really booming right about now, ain't it?

Compared to the rest of Central Europe it is.
jon357 71 | 20,799
13 Dec 2012 #847
Compared to most places in Europe it is doing well.
1jola 14 | 1,879
13 Dec 2012 #848
So, your wife doesn't care that you're broke, unemployed, and in debt, just as long you're not as bad off as the Smiths next door. She even says you're doing great. lol

Hate to tell you, but 1.4% growth and on the verge of recession is not considered a boom, in economic terms.
berni23 7 | 379
13 Dec 2012 #849
So, your wife doesn't care that you're broke, unemployed, and in debt, just as long you're not as bad off as the Smiths next door. She even says you're doing great. lol

Judging others by your standards again i see.

Hate to tell you, but 1.4% growth and on the verge of recession is not considered a boom, in economic terms.

1.4%? Care to back that up?

1.4%? Care to back that up?

Never mind, i already seen it decreased significantly:
f stop 25 | 2,513
13 Dec 2012 #850
Horizontal axis?
FlaglessPole 4 | 669
13 Dec 2012 #851
time stands still in Poland... yet pretty up to date at the same time.. one shouldn't be optimistic about this whole situation tho, 'coz if this continues Poland will be living in the past pretty soon.. I just thought that was obvious
f stop 25 | 2,513
14 Dec 2012 #852
I really would like to know what each tick on x axis represents - months? years?
Meathead 5 | 473
14 Dec 2012 #853
Angry Catholic. There are plenty of those about.
OP aphrodisiac 11 | 2,441
14 Dec 2012 #854
Ya I see more and more people moving back to Poland with the way the economy is going. Also for me it was so much easier and cheaper to start a business here than it would have been back in the states..

It really depends on the business.

Oh, Afro, you're free to start a topic at any time.

I have been on this forum for a long time and I am retired at the moment. Just check, what is written and most of the time it is written for the sake of writing, very much removed from reality.

Compared to most places in Europe it is doing well.

true, but other places in Europe have not been doing well at all, so the comparison does not have a leg to stand on.

time stands still in Poland... yet pretty up to date at the same time.. one shouldn't be optimistic about this whole situation tho, 'coz if this continues Poland will be living in the past pretty soon.. I just thought that was obvious

True, dynamic is not something one should use to describe Poland at the moment. I have noticed it at least a year ago, but it has started sooner then that.

Angry Catholic. There are plenty of those about.

Radical stance is a sign of poor economy. Although Polo does not live in Poland, somehow he adopted such a stance.
1jola 14 | 1,879
14 Dec 2012 #855
I really would like to know what each tick on x axis represents - months? years?

If a truck was about to mow you over, you no doubt would be most concerned whether it was red or blue.

Just check, what is written and most of the time it is written for the sake of writing, very much removed from reality.

Most of the foreigners who post here, especially the "experts" on all things Polish are far removed from reality in Poland. They give a very distorted view of what goes on here. This should not be surprising as they have limited access to our culture, language, and little understanding of historical events that shape our present situation. They would scoff at, perhaps even ridicule, a Pole who in a few years living in his expat enclave would try to "explain" England to you, for example. Dolpho comes to mind as a perfect example. Last month, he claimed Ruch Palikota is the second largest party in Poland, where in fact RP has not one senator, 4% popularity, and if there were elections at present, they would not even get into Parliament. People here actually take him seriously though.

Anyway, reality is frightening and it is natural to avoid it. If you want reality, start with how the communists prepared in the mid-80's for the "fall" of communism. Understanding this would help understanding the present. Temat rzeka.
OP aphrodisiac 11 | 2,441
14 Dec 2012 #856
Anyway, reality is frightening and it is natural to avoid it. If you want reality, start with how the communists prepared in the mid-80's for the "fall" of communism. Understanding this would help understanding the present. Temat rzeka.

why do you get so patronizing? I was in Poland during those times.
f stop 25 | 2,513
14 Dec 2012 #857
start with how the communists prepared in the mid-80's for the "fall" of communism

I would be interested to know how you think they prepared for it!
pip 10 | 1,659
14 Dec 2012 #858
1jola: start with how the communists prepared in the mid-80's for the "fall" of communism
I would be interested to know how you think they prepared for it!

they socked their money away in banks and when the walls came down they were the first to open businesses- big businesses. If you notice, those in the communist gov't came out shining while the regular workers didn't fair as well.
f stop 25 | 2,513
14 Dec 2012 #859
so, those that had money, opened businesses. It appears that they were either opportunists or businessmen, either way, knew how to adapt..
berni23 7 | 379
14 Dec 2012 #860
To be honest those in power in Poland or across Eastern Europe for that matter have never been Communist or even Socialist.
Whats true is that they were the ones who had the cash, the insider knowledge of profitable companies and quickly took them over after the curtain came down across Eastern Europe.
f stop 25 | 2,513
14 Dec 2012 #861
hehe I figured that by communists we didn't mean those that thought the wealth should be shared ;)
pip 10 | 1,659
14 Dec 2012 #862
Well, the thing is- these people, and a huge majority involved in politics in communist Poland, were preaching to the masses about the ideals of communism but were not following it themselves.

It has nothing to do with adapting. They were liars and thieves and they actually still are- even though they now call it capitalism here.
FlaglessPole 4 | 669
14 Dec 2012 #863
It has nothing to do with adapting. They were liars and thieves and they actually still are- even though they now call it capitalism here.

well there is that but there is a fair amount of those, who think that 'whoever is successful must be a crook', as if...
OP aphrodisiac 11 | 2,441
14 Dec 2012 #864
well, the thing is that those who didn't succeed in new capitalism think that most of the people who did are crooks. The reality is not so b&w, because my sis was not a crook and she succeeded. Simple hard work and the ability to adapt:D
f stop 25 | 2,513
14 Dec 2012 #865
but wait, those "crooks", assuming they were, would you consider their political ideology communist or capitalist?
pip 10 | 1,659
15 Dec 2012 #866
During communism many of these people I am talking about, didn't actually follow any ideology but what was best for themselves, yet basically lied that they were pro communism, made money through lies but made sure the masses were following the methodology. They were neither communist nor capitalist- just liars. And they are still liars.
Foreigner4 12 | 1,768
29 Dec 2012 #867
One thing that would NEVER happen in Poland imo:

If anyone ever wants to point at cultural differences, this is one thing that a) isn't surprising to any Canadian b) is positive, so enjoy it: )
Zibi - | 336
29 Dec 2012 #868
One thing that would NEVER happen in Poland

I hope not. It is a totally stupid idea. Paying forward like that brings neither joy nor consolation to anyone. No people in need were involved either.


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