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Polack/American Polonia/Plastic Pole "culture"


Harry
8 Nov 2010 #421
Plastic Poles think it is acceptable to volunteer to murder millions of Poles and to accuse people of raping Polish children. Real Poles know that neither thing is acceptable. But then, real Poles are rarely traitors or cowards and plastic Poles are usually both.
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
8 Nov 2010 #422
A great many post-PRL and RPIII Poles are poor imitations of the 'cudzoziemcy' they pretend to be, second-rate copycats and wannabes, aping foreign things and rarely coming up with anything original of their own. They wolf down Big Macs, pizzas, kebabs and (if they are wannabe yuppies) sushi, listen to rap crap and don't even have their own Polish keybaord, but a Yankee one that requries double-typing to get the Polish characters. They are worse than 'plastic Poles' -- they are plastic people!
Chicago Pollock 7 | 504
9 Nov 2010 #423
Unfortunately when Polanians vote in Polish elections they don't have to live with the consequences. But this is something that has Polish roots as historically Poles have been governed (ruled) by outsiders.

They are worse than 'plastic Poles' -- they are plastic people!

You're too hard on your own people (but than again this is a Polish trait also, isn't it?). The Poles have come out of foreign rule for about the last two hundred years. They need some time to re-develop. In America, ethnic Poles reach their full potential, especially after the first generation.
landora - | 199
9 Nov 2010 #424
Why should Polonians living abroad even want to vote in Polish elections?

Why are you convinced that Poles living (and paying taxes) in Poland are not capable of higher feelings? That is none of your business who we choose in our elections, you are not Polish, you don'rt have to live with the consequences. Carry Poland in your heart as much as you want (what a romantic crap, by the way), this doesn't mean anything, dance "Polka dances" and eat kiełbasa or pierogi made by "busha", but leave any important decisions to real Poles living in the country! We have to get on with our lives here. Some people have a cheek...
Havok 10 | 912
9 Nov 2010 #425
Plastic Poles think it is acceptable to volunteer to murder millions of Poles and to accuse people of raping Polish children.

Can you elaborate more on this or provide some examples? WTH are you talking about?This is absolutely ridiculous harry lol.

A great many post-PRL and RPIII Poles are poor imitations of the 'cudzoziemcy' they pretend to be, second-rate copycats and wannabes, aping foreign things and rarely coming up with anything original of their own.

Hmm, you’re using a lot of ugly words… but what you’re trying to partially describe here is a process of adaptation. “Adaptation is the process whereby a population becomes better suited to its habitat.”

For more intelligent people this process can be quite easy and effective, others get stuck in a time warp and continue on living their lives in a less successful manner.

Being stuck with old mentality, like yourself, and refusing to try new things doesn’t lead to anything exciting.
I would agree that there are people out there who just imitate without much thought given, but it’s a common practice everywhere, not just limited exclusively to Poland. Want to change the world for the better? be my guest.

In America, ethnic Poles reach their full potential, especially after the first generation.

I definitely agree with you Chicago. I’ve seen it, it is true.
Polonius3 seems a very angry and envious person. There is a jealousy and then there is envy.

Jealousy is when you desire something you don’t have and others do, so you get mad because you wish you had it and you don’t. As a result you devote yourself to working hard in order to get it.

The Polish envy is stronger than jealousy, it’s when you actually hurt the other person and do something against them because you hate them for something you wish to have and you don’t. Discrediting someone who appears more successful is one example of Polish envy. Polonius, Delph and a few others are the perfect examples of that.


That is none of your business who we choose in our elections, you are not Polish, you don'rt have to live with the consequences. Carry Poland in your heart as much as you want (what a romantic crap, by the way), this doesn't mean anything, dance "Polka dances" and eat kiełbasa or pierogi made by "busha", but leave any important decisions to real Poles living in the country! We have to get on with our lives here.

You’re very bitter landora. If you whish to change something in your country please study to be a lawyer, and encourage others to do so as well. Polish regulations and the corruption are killing the country. Voting in a system like that makes no difference.

Can you please provide a recent example of one famous person living currently in Poland that attempted to make an honest difference? I'm actually interested to know.

You guys are very plastic and fake by my standards.
OP delphiandomine 88 | 18,475
12 Nov 2010 #426
You’re very bitter landora. If you whish to change something in your country please study to be a lawyer, and encourage others to do so as well. Polish regulations and the corruption are killing the country. Voting in a system like that makes no difference.

What use would studying to be a lawyer be? Last time I checked, lawyers didn't make laws.

Can you please provide a recent example of one famous person living currently in Poland that attempted to make an honest difference? I'm actually interested to know.

Not difficult - I see people making an honest difference every day. You know, real Poles doing real work - not Plastic Poles hiding in America.

You guys are very plastic and fake by my standards.

There's nothing more Plastic and Fake than a person who doesn't speak Polish, proclaiming themselves to be Polish.

Incidentally, why have none of the "Polack" haters commented on Polack Johnny's?
Havok 10 | 912
12 Nov 2010 #427
What use would studying to be a lawyer be? Last time I checked, lawyers didn't make laws.

I know Ruski, I wasn't suggesting rewriting Polish constitution, lawyers help people fight for their rights. There is a lot of injustice in Poland and a lot of bitter people because of that. If you want to help them, study law and help them.

Not difficult - I see people making an honest difference every day. You know, real Poles doing real work - not Plastic Poles hiding in America.

Classic, LMAO, ok? so who is it then?

There's nothing more Plastic and Fake than a person who doesn't speak Polish, proclaiming themselves to be Polish.
Incidentally, why have none of the "Polack" haters commented on Polack Johnny's?

How do you know that i don't speak Polish? I don't "feel" to you as naive as some of the dumb polish that kiss your as$ for teaching them some Scottish? You can't fool me buddy, you're just a loud mouth dummy.
OP delphiandomine 88 | 18,475
14 Nov 2010 #428
Interesting article, and proves a lot about what I've been saying.

buffalonews.com/life/taste/elements/article247067.ece

The sausage called kielbasa might be the food that Americans most recognize as Polish. But that doesn't mean a Polish person would recognize what's sold as "kielbasa" in most American supermarkets.

It would seem that what Americans think of as "Polish" bears no relation to what is actually Polish.

(And hey, Fuzzy, I know fine well that the same applies in reverse ;))
Bolle 1 | 147
14 Nov 2010 #429
You know, real Poles doing real work - not Plastic Poles hiding in America.

And you're a brit hiding in Poland. Why don't you go back to the struggling UK to work there to make your country a better place?

There's nothing more Plastic and Fake than a person who doesn't speak Polish, proclaiming themselves to be Polish.

Once again you don't understand the US.
Polish-Americans are Polish americans - they know this, but when people ask about their backgrounds they will say polish - it doesn't mean they are polish, just of polish descent. Same thing goes for italian-americans, scottish-americans, mexican americans etc. If they are of mixed heritage, they will say "I am polish, german, chinese and ....." They will always say they are american until someone asks about their ancestry. A lot of people in the US are just aware of where they came from.

Simple as that.
PlasticPole 7 | 2,649
14 Nov 2010 #430
You know, real Poles doing real work - not Plastic Poles hiding in America.

What about Plastic Poles in America doing real work?
Softsong 5 | 495
15 Nov 2010 #431
Exactly, Bolle, you explained it perfectly! I think Delph gets two groups of people in America mixed up. Those recently from Poland who were born there (may or may not go back), and have more of a claim that they are Polish, as opposed to those of us who have Polish ancestry.

You are right, we are Americans first, but when asked or even if not asked, we may say that we are of Polish descent. The short way of saying this is I am Polish. And you are absolutely correct that it means of Polish descent. No need for labels of Plastic. None of us is hiding in America. We were born here as a rule and besides being American have a love for the country of our ancestry.

That is why a lot of people come here. To learn more about Poland because we know we are far from experts. We hope that Poles from Poland will help us to know the country better.

That is why I loved McCoy's posts among others, even those not Polish who live in Poland. They have posted pictures of interesting places, scenic beauty, popular music, etc.

I hope that eventually Delph can be less bitter about us in America. He may have met or read something ignorant by someone in America, but it is so unfair to judge us all adversely.

I think it is wonderful that he is in Poland and takes such a great interest in the country. Maybe he can be like one of those people living there that act as a mirror for us here in America and reflect what he wants us to know about Polska.
MediaWatch 10 | 945
15 Nov 2010 #432
They will always say they are american until someone asks about their ancestry. A lot of people in the US are just aware of where they came from.
Simple as that.

BINGO!

That's what I've been trying to say about Polish Americans.
I agree with you Softsong. Well said. I've been trying to say that about Polish Americans.
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,883
15 Nov 2010 #433
time and time again Delph, the same comment is going to surface. that being:

Bolle wrote:

Once again you don't understand the US.

you can rant and rave about plastic poles all you want but in the end, it's just how it is in america and with many many other ethnicities. this phenomenon is hardly limited to poles or plastic poles or whatever you want to call them.

you're making judgements about things you don't understand. you're a scot, born in scotland (i guess) but for most americans, their families are from all over the world, they may be white, asian, black, latino....yet they speak with perfect american accents and think like an american because that's what they are.....american. it's like no other country in the world.

honestly dude, expedia.com, travelocity.com, cheapoair.com....whatever you like to use, spend a few weeks there, see for yourself.
convex 20 | 3,978
15 Nov 2010 #434
Just out of curiosity, how many of you have Polish parents? That is, parents born and raised in Poland? Do you speak Polish with your parents?
Softsong 5 | 495
15 Nov 2010 #435
My mother had Polish parents. She spoke Polish because she learned from her grandmother. Her brother and sisters did not learn. In later life, she spoke Polish with her mother when they wanted to speak privately.

My father had German parents and he knew Low German and High German. Obviously, my mother and father only spoke to each other in English. So, I only learned a little bit in each language.

All my grandparents (Polish and German) were born in Poland, either when it was non-existent during the partitions, the semi-independent Congress Poland or after WWI.

My ethnic Polish side of the family came from Gniezno, and my ethnic Germans from the Vistula area in Central Poland.

My German grandfather was a citizen of Poland till 1928. He became American at that point, but his sister remained Polish her whole life even though she lived in America.
convex 20 | 3,978
15 Nov 2010 #436
That's an interesting history. It sounds like you have quite a bit of information about your ancestors. Do you still have family in Poland?
Softsong 5 | 495
15 Nov 2010 #437
I got interested in my history more intensely in recent years. It started with seeing if the town had my grandmother's birth certificate. I was amazed they did. With all the changes in government and wars, they had it. So then I got hooked on genealogy.

My mother's immediate family all came to America. Even her great grandfather. He was a retired blacksmith. Lots of the children died during one of the sicknesses that struck. Out of 8 children, only two survived, my grandmother and her brother. He had only one child and his child died as a teen, so I only have my immediate family from my Polish grandmother that I am close with. I am not aware of any family in Poland on my Polish side, but I am working on it. I know they must be there. :-)

The name Bubacz is rather rare in Poland and they come mainly from Poznan, Pila, Gniezno. Now that I know the parish church where I got my great grandparent's marriage certificate, I will look to see who their brothers and sisters were and if my grandparents had any siblings that stayed in Poland.

I did find that I have some distant family still in Poland that were ethnic Germans. They stayed because they had married into Polish families. The man who now owns my grandmother's farm appears to be a 5th cousin. I had such a wonderful time this summer in Poland visiting all the places where family had once lived.

I have been to Poland now three times and love it. I have many friends there and I almost married a Polish man and moved to Poland. But that's another story....lol
RubasznyRumcajs 5 | 487
15 Nov 2010 #438
@Polonius3
"(..)don't even have their own Polish keybaord, but a Yankee one that requries double-typing to get the Polish characters.(..)"

Polish typist keyboard (214keys) is a crap; i'm glad it extincted with typewriters. "the yankee one" (US International) is much better for me and for most people.
Softsong 5 | 495
15 Nov 2010 #439
Hi RubasznyRumcajs, I can toggle back and forth between English and Polish keyboard. It is an option on Windows. I got some transparent sticky Polish letters to affix to my keyboard. I can still see the English letters underneath, but also the Polish ones on top.

Biggest problem for me is the reversal of y and z and some of the punctuation.
Bolle 1 | 147
15 Nov 2010 #440
I hope that eventually Delph can be less bitter about us in America. He may have met or read something ignorant by someone in America, but it is so unfair to judge us all adversely.

He hates the USA - simple as that. I think he is also jealous of the US and jealous of Poles who have found success there as well.
Softsong 5 | 495
15 Nov 2010 #441
Well, I did read he likes American History, so I give him the benefit of the doubt. I do believe he hates Poles who went to America. Maybe because he is a foreigner in Poland and knows Polish and feels superior to those who have Polish "blood" but only speak English.
Bolle 1 | 147
15 Nov 2010 #442
He has a condition called 'british supremacism.' He feels superior to everyone.
OP delphiandomine 88 | 18,475
15 Nov 2010 #443
Well, I did read he likes American History, so I give him the benefit of the doubt.

Yup, I'm a fan of American history. I like American politics too - the way that individual members of Congress have such power (compared to most parliaments) is very interesting - as is the way that the President yields executive power, yet still has to rely on Congress.

The most interesting thing for me is the whole issue of whether or not the Confederate states were allowed to secede from the Union - I actually did a history course on the American Civil War, including quite a few discussions on the actual constitutionality of the secession.

Interesting stuff, and certainly is counter to the whole "America has no history" nonsense. I only wish I knew more - my knowledge of pre-Reagan era politics (except the Civil War) isn't as much as I'd like to know.
Softsong 5 | 495
15 Nov 2010 #444
Delph, something tells me that you will eventually get around to it. My impression is that you have a quick mind. At one time, I preferred European history to American history, but I have come to enjoy both.
landora - | 199
15 Nov 2010 #445
I'm not bitter at all. It just annoys me that people that don't live in my country, that don't even speak Polish dare to claim they know better what's bets for Poland. Let me say this: It's none of your business!

The Polonia (and many Poles) still have the romantic view of the emmigration, of people living abroad, writing romantic poetry and missing their country that is struggling under the foreign rule. Let me tell you this: it's detrimental for our country! Poland is a free country now, you can come and work here if you want and if you care. There's no need to stay abroad, there's no danger in coming to Poland, noone will arrest you, noone will punish you. If you're so patriotic, come and pay taxes here, let's get the example from hard working Western countries, not from our spoppy romantic history and books (as beautiful as they are). The times have changed, we have our chance now.

Why do you think I should be a lawyer to change anything in my country? The lawyers don't make law - you don't have to be a lawyer to be a politician. You don't have to be a politician to make a difference. I make my country more beautiful with my everyday work plus I pay taxes - so yes, I do make a difference. More then you do, for sure.

What are your standards, prey tell me?

I know Ruski, I wasn't suggesting rewriting Polish constitution, lawyers help people fight for their rights.

Hahhaaaaaaaaaahhaaaa! You're so naive :D

Anyway, go to some high school with your advice, it's waaaaaaaaay too late for me to study law now (even if I ever wanted to, which I haven't).
Havok 10 | 912
15 Nov 2010 #446
i do speak Polish.

again, I found your response very bitter and condescending. I'm not sure what triggers that.
btw I don't feel that I’m better than you, if you were wondering...

So asking someone to study to become a lawyer is considered to be naive in Poland? Hmm, ok

What do you do in your everyday work than?

Question, why it's too late for you to study? are you about to die?
You’re vicious, unreasonable, rude, and very close-minded and my standards are - basically the opposite.
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
15 Nov 2010 #447
I found your response very bitter and condescending.

Honestly, I don't think it is landora that sounds very bitter and condescending in this instance but you.

Read it again:
Havok 10 | 912
15 Nov 2010 #448
I appoligize that i gave you guys this impression. It's just an opinion, why you are interpreting it as bitter is really beyond me.

IMO, it's difficult to justify that voting in a country with a significant corruption problem would make a difference.

In 2009 Poland was ranked 35th in "Best Countries for Business" by comparison, now Poland is ranked as 70th. The corruption is mentioned as the major contributing factor for the decline.

forbes.com/lists/2010/6/best-countries-10_Best-Countries-for-Business_Rank_2.html

doingbusiness.org/rankings
pgtx 30 | 3,157
15 Nov 2010 #449
I appoligize

on your knees, Havok!

he he...
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
15 Nov 2010 #450
why you are interpreting it as bitter is really beyond me.

And what basis is your opinion on?
You make Poland sound like a backward thirdworld country, with no democracy in fair and free elections, that's the bitter part.

forbes.com/lists/2010/6/best-countries-10_Best-Countr ies-fo r-Business_Rank_2.html

You keep throwing that up, I see you are going to stick with it come hell or high water, whatever flouts your boat.

doingbusiness.org/rankings

And there is no way in hell that Lithuania is a better place than Poland for business, that is total BS.


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