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How will BREXIT affect the immigrants in UK and Poland.



Lyzko 17 | 3,692    
9 Jun 2017  #631

Probably you're right, Idem! Anyway, I think Great Britain's actions were both precipitous (zbyt pospieszny), not to mention politically inept, especially at a period in our history when cooperation, not separatism, remains our greatest asset in the fight against organized terror:-)

As ISIS is united in its war against the West, how must it look to ISIS leaders to see their enemies do disunited amongst each other? Gives one pause for though, doesn't it.


idem - | 140    
9 Jun 2017  #632

Storm in a teacup- in anti British EU press.....10 groszy today?

Article in polish but this graph is in ridiculous scale- hagh level of manipulation

businessinsider.com.pl/gielda/waluty/kurs-funta-w-najblizszym-czasie-klopoty-polakow-z-wysp/l8qc8hc
Lyzko 17 | 3,692    
9 Jun 2017  #633

"A tempest in a teapot", you mean? Yes, perhaps:-) I'll check out the article, thanks!
Lyzko 17 | 3,692    
9 Jun 2017  #634

I guess the caption below the photo in the article says it all: "Poles residing in Britain will lose out owing to a weak Pound."
idem - | 140    
9 Jun 2017  #635

cooperation, not separatism, remains our greatest asset in the fight against organized terror:-)

Unfortunately there is very little unity in Europe ( EU) now - irrelevant with or without UK-and cooperation is often forced and imposed on other countries by Germany .

'Tempest in a teapot'- I never heard it - It must be American version of this saying :-)
Lyzko 17 | 3,692    
9 Jun 2017  #636

Indeed it must be, in fact, it IS:-)) The Polish version is nearly the same.

You're telling me! If there were any more disunity within the Continent, we might start calling her Asia ( a reference to the other continent of many nations with NO all-encompassing Council)LOL

Again, though, without the Brexit, you folks gain, with Brexit, you lose. For this reason, I'd wager the majority of Poles, as well as other foreigners living in the British Isles, are in favor of Brexit.
idem - | 140    
9 Jun 2017  #637

I'd wager the majority of Poles, as well as other foreigners living in the British Isles, are in favor of Brexit.

No, they are not- Why would they be for Brexit? I am lucky one as I have dual citizenship but lots of European people in UK worry about their status after Brexit

and in general feel unwanted here :-(

It mainly narrow-minded 'little Englanders'( as they call them here :-)) and retired people voted for Brexit.
Lyzko 17 | 3,692    
9 Jun 2017  #638

Whoops, I misstyped. I clearly meant "....are NOT in favor of Brexit"!
idem - | 140    
9 Jun 2017  #639

@Lyzko

It all calmed down now but just after Brexit vote UK showed rather ugly xenophobic face.
Lyzko 17 | 3,692    
9 Jun 2017  #640

I think I understand you, Idem. Everything's subsided for now, but immediately following [THE] Brexit vote, [THE] UK began showing it's ugly, xenophobic side. Is that what you wanted to say? If so, I agree with this assessment.

Then again, xenophobia's never been far below the surface throughout much of Europe. Germany for example, about which I can speak amply from personal experience is "de-fanged" for the present time, yet, as we saw with PEGIDA and AfD, ant-foreign sentiment seethes below the surface, same as in France, Poland, Sweden, The Netherlands, even Denmark:-)
peterweg 36 | 2,292    
10 Jun 2017  #641

ant-foreign sentiment seethes below the surface, same as in France, Poland, Sweden, The Netherlands, even Denmark:-)

Its everywhere. America, Europe, Australia, Russia, China varying levels of racism. Its human nature, apparently. Some animals attack, kill and even eat other social groups of the same species.
Crow 137 | 5,911    
10 Jun 2017  #642

I will so like that all Poles from Britain come back to Poland. They will bring interesting quality- that what is worth in Britain and what would be anyway lost in years to come, in manically forced multicultural soup. Effect of their return to Poland would be felt in entire Slavic world.

Imagine now that complete Slavic dispora in the world return to home. That would be awesome. But, are Slavic countries ready for this?
spiritus 67 | 617    
10 Jun 2017  #643

I expect "Brexit" may mean something very different in 2 years compared to it's definition today.
Lyzko 17 | 3,692    
10 Jun 2017  #644

Considering that Parliament is even able to put through the Brexit, we'll have to wait and see:-)
cms 9 | 1,174    
10 Jun 2017  #645

@spiritus
I thought Brexit means Brexit :) precisely the kind of clarity May was famous for !
Marsupial - | 924    
11 Jun 2017  #646

In the age of the internet and faster travel people see retreating back too much as a sign of backwardness. The world is geared now to be travelled and distant neughbours feel closer. People want decent wages and opportunity and they can't get it being stuck out on their own, like weirdo lepers.

Standard of living is the real key and sending the current pm to the eu to negotiate won't raise the standard of living or open new opportunity.
idem - | 140    
11 Jun 2017  #647

but immediately following [THE] Brexit vote, [THE] UK began showing

I think you must be very insecure person- all this patronising -grammar correcting attitude- makes you look just pathetic.
spiritus 67 | 617    
11 Jun 2017  #648

I thought Brexit means Brexit :) precisely the kind of clarity May was famous for !

That was just a soundbite from a leader determined to sound ............determined-nothing more. I think even as she was uttering the words "Brexit means Brexit" she didn't have crystal clear clarity on what form of Brexit we were pursuing. With the events over the last few days I think the UK has moved closed to a very open interpretation of what Brexit means and I'm still not entirely convinced it will ever actually happen
peterweg 36 | 2,292    
11 Jun 2017  #649

I'm still not entirely convinced it will ever actually happen

Its looking almost impossible for it happen.
mafketis 16 | 4,865    
11 Jun 2017  #650

How so? Over 80 % of voters supported parties committed to pursuing it. On the other hand, the trend in the EU is toward muzzling democracy so overturning the result of the referendum (and election) would be par for the course.
spiritus 67 | 617    
11 Jun 2017  #651

How so? Over 80 % of voters supported parties committed to pursuing it

Depends how you look at it. I assume the 80% you are referring to is from the General Election. However, in the EU referendum 48% of people did not want to leave and the way the question was formed to the people even the 52% who did vote to leave didn't really know what exactly they were voting for.

Teresa May has interpreted the result her own way and that means a hard Brexit
cms 9 | 1,174    
11 Jun 2017  #652

@mafketis
The EU has accepted Britain's letter and told them they are leaving in March 2019. That is a fairly straightforward response to the democratic decision.

They will be waiting for the Brits with a full coffee pot and some cinnamon buns next week to start talking out the practicalities. It is the British side who does not seem able to execute their decision.
Lyzko 17 | 3,692    
11 Jun 2017  #653

@Idem.

As this is a learning forum, above all, a venue for Polish native speakers such as yourself to practice their English skills, I scarcely feel that such a complaint is appropriate. You ought to be grateful, as I'd be grateful for a native Polish speaker correcting my Polish:-)

On the topic of Brexit, it is pity that Farage in particular is so provincial and has exercised this kind of poor judgement in attempting to carry out the Brexit. It will only hurt both the UK and the EU in the end.
spiritus 67 | 617    
13 Jun 2017  #654

As this is a learning forum, above all, a venue for Polish native speakers such as yourself to practice their English skills

Not really or is it a learning forum because you say it is ? I agree with the poster that it's pretty poor form to criticise someone's English on a forum where people from all round the world regularly contribute (often in their second language).

That is a fairly straightforward response to the democratic decision.

Nothing is straightforward in life especially in politics. The Brexit delivered an outcome that most politicians, even the pro-Brexit ones, did not expect. I'm convinced that Johnson and Gove believed it would make a nice protest vote and then once Brexit was defeated then it would be back to business as usual.

Instead, the calamitous decision has led to one PM resigning and another one on the verge of being kicked out. Europe would prefer the UK to remain and I think they will accept a change of heart from the UK if ever that happens.

What is more likely to happen is that the hard Brexit that May was pursuing will now soften and that could well include freedom of movement for workers and therefore Poles
mafketis 16 | 4,865    
13 Jun 2017  #655

The Brexit delivered an outcome that most politicians, even the pro-Brexit ones, did not expect

My thoughts were (before the referendum) that it had a greater than 50 % chance of passing. But then I was paying attention and European politicians mostly spend no time in actually thinking about citizen concerns (because the market state is soooo not about that), so of course they were surprised.

The question is solve for the Brexit referendum and the recent election results (yes, I know that domestic issues also played a part in the recent election but even those tie into the commonality).
cms 9 | 1,174    
13 Jun 2017  #656

Yes Spritus I agree with that - all I am saying is that the EU is not at fault and they just want to get it over with quickly. The problem wit the referendum and the political situation in the U.K. now that while both parties want to respect the result, there is nobody willing to do the sleeves-rolled-up work of making it happen and all the people that promoted it have run a mile.
Lyzko 17 | 3,692    
13 Jun 2017  #657

@Spiritus, if correct expression is no longer important, particularly when the poster in question's first language isn't the "forum language" aka their mother tongue, then the forum indeed becomes a learning forum. I'm delighted if somebody takes the time to constructively correct my Polish. Therefore, there's no earthly reason why the reverse should not be equally respected:-)

Concerning the Brexit, it appears things are so in flux right now throughout the UK, that it may be stuck "in committee", so to speak, for years.

A bureaucratic muddle, if you ask me!
spiritus 67 | 617    
13 Jun 2017  #658

@Lyzko
It's for the poster to decide if it's a learning forum or not. Perhaps they simply want to make a point in English about the topic being discussed and not be corrected on any grammatical mistakes they make en route to doing that. Without face to face communication then correcting someone's language can sometimes be considered as pedantic or condescending. I don't think you were trying to be either of those two things but there are some on this forum who are happy to score cheap points against anyone who disagrees with them so I think it could be a dangerous precedence to set.
Lyzko 17 | 3,692    
13 Jun 2017  #659

As my Polish posts on open forum have often been corrected (and rightly so), be they in the "Language" folder or not, I took it upon myself to correct my forum colleague's English in order to facilitate communication, plain and simple:-) If I can't honestly understand what someone has posted, whether they are a native English speaker or not, I will address that, perhaps even re-cast the sentence so that it reads properly for ALL to understand, rather than merely allowing mistakes to be justified for the purposes of not admitting to error! If any venue is open to the free expression of posters in English, yet whose first language isn't English, furthermore, whose second language skills appear challenged, I shall continue to endeavor to correct that poster's English. Most will claim they need no correction and that they are only here to express their opinions etc. Such remains to be seen!

Sadly, we've lost the main thread a bit. I believe I'd stated before that I feel Brexit's a bad move for Britain and will doubtless have a negative impact on numerous foreign nationals residing in the British Isles, Poles among them.
Atch 13 | 1,846    
14 Jun 2017  #660

There is no way the UK will 'expel' EU nationals already permanently living or domiciled there. Poles have nothing to fear in that respect. I'm certain that was never going to happen regardless of a hard or soft Brexit. However interestingly in the last few days there have been suggestions that Britian will now soften its stance on movement of people in return for a better trade deal. That's going to be a bitter pill to swallow for those who voted in favour of Brexit from an immigration point of view. They're going to be the real losers, not the foreign nationals!




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