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The Polish Wedding - What is it Like in Poland?


Harry
6 Mar 2012 #121
Depends where in Poland you're talking about.
MinaD 1 | 25
6 Mar 2012 #122
Hmmm West Poland?
pam
8 Jul 2012 #123
Merged: Polish wedding traditions

My friends are getting married on the 27th in a civil ceremony, and i am one of their witnesses.
Due to lack of time, i haven't had a chance to ask my friends about polish traditions, as they are more concerned with dresses, suits, rings etc.

I did explain a couple of english traditions e.g bride wearing something old, new, borrowed and blue (usually applies more to church weddings though )

Do poles have stag/hen nights? Do they have anything traditional to eat on the day as for eg wigilia?.The reception is taking place in their home, so they will be making their own food.

More worringly, i don't hav e the faintest idea what to buy as a gift. They have everything for the home and i would like to get something a bit more unusual.
poland_
8 Jul 2012 #124
i don't hav e the faintest idea what to buy as a gift

Envelope with money

Tradition after the service

1. Everyone lines up and gives the newlyweds wishes flowers and a envelope with money.
2. At reception they will be given ' A loaf of bread and salt' Two glasses to choose from one with water the other with vodka, whoever gets the vodka will rule the roost.Speeches are not normal although plenty of stolat's are so make sure you arrive with a well functioning liver...
strzyga 2 | 993
8 Jul 2012 #125
At reception they will be given ' A loaf of bread and salt'

That's from the parents, if they're there.

Do poles have stag/hen nights?

Some do and some don't. It's increasingly popular but nowhere near obligatory.

Do they have anything traditional to eat on the day as for eg wigilia?

no, maybe just the wedding cake

i would like to get something a bit more unusual.

Do they have any interests/passions? If not, money is the safest way out.

polish traditions

One thing I can think of is the penny shower - like rice shower but you use pennies. And they're supposed to collect them all.
PennBoy 76 | 2,437
8 Jul 2012 #126
Polish wedding traditions

fight.. it wouldn't be a Polish wedding without it ;)
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,884
9 Jul 2012 #127
trains. polish weddings constantly have people lined up in a train, walking in circles.
beckski 12 | 1,617
9 Jul 2012 #128
We did the conga at my cousin's Polish wedding. It was lots of fun.
NorthMancPolak 4 | 648
9 Jul 2012 #129
fight.. it wouldn't be a Polish wedding without it ;)

trains. polish weddings constantly have people lined up in a train, walking in circles.

We did the conga at my cousin's Polish wedding.

Mine didn't have any of these, and my wedding couldn't have been much more Polish if it tried.

Lots of fat rhythm-free uncles trying to dance, though. :D
pam
10 Jul 2012 #130
Thanks everyone for advice.
They won't be getting a loaf and salt as neither set of parents will be attending .All i know is that they are definitely having Polish music! Must get round to asking some questions!

As regards giving money, i suppose it's practical, but how do you decide how much to give? Potentially embarrassing if some give more than others.

Reminds me a bit of dreaded present lists the English have, everyone finds out whose chosen what eventually.
So i guess i need to go armed with flowers and pennies then!
Hipis - | 227
10 Jul 2012 #131
As regards giving money, i suppose it's practical, but how do you decide how much to give? Potentially embarrassing if some give more than others.

Depends on how well you know them and what you'd be prepared to spend on a present if you were to buy one and obviously what you can afford. At the end of the day it's your gift and it should be private between you and the bride & groom so as long as you're not too stingy or over generous then no one else should know how much you gave them.

There's a thread here related to what you just asked. Have a read and see if that helps
polishforums.com/society-culture-38/wedding-present-polish-friends-much-money-should-give-53530
teflcat 5 | 1,032
10 Jul 2012 #132
As regards giving money, i suppose it's practical, but how do you decide how much to give?

300/pair, I'd say, for middle income folks. We were given money, and of course cash is always welcome, but a well-chosen gift will be with them forever.

I know you said they've got everything for the home, but how about this. I gave friends high quality salt and pepper mills about twelve years ago. They told me recently that my gift is the only one they use on a daily basis. Good quality linen napkins or tablecloths will last a lifetime. How about a fine picture frame? Have fun.
Margareta
1 Feb 2017 #133
I've been to many "Polish" weddings in the U.S. It did seem to be the point to get drunk. But even when I was a kid, it was pretty disgusting to be around all those men and some women who were so drunk they couldn't stand. I hope I haven't hurt anyone's feelings.

A very important thing is the food. There must be lots of it. Polish people always feed their guests and make sure there's more than the guests will finish.

I've seen that the men who request a dance with the bride will pin money on her dress.
The older women gather around the bride and sing and sing. Songs about love, travails, hopes. All sorts of things. Of course they sing them in Polish.

The Polka is an Americanized version of Polish dancing, I was told. TRaditional dancing in Poland, perhaps pre-WWII, was more stately. Or, the person who informed said it was. But he was descended from nobility.

I thought it was the mother in law who removed the veil and put a cap on the bride's head to tell her she was no longer a girl, but a married woman who would have much to do in a household. Sometimes the mother in law would be a bit gleeful. And the bride would cry. Because in many cases, the bride would move in with the groom's parents and the bride would do her husband's mother's bidding. Tradition. Perhaps this was regional in Poland. But it did happen in the US.
Ironside 49 | 10,196
1 Feb 2017 #134
I hope I haven't hurt anyone's feelings.

People gather together and get drunk. That is an ancient rite. Across humanity, nothing 'ethnic' about it. You're detached and biased elitist or a poseur.

who were so drunk they couldn't stand.

You are not going out much do you? The only difference between 'Polish' wedding and 'American' wedding is that those who want to get drunk go to a bar or somewhere else and get rightly soused rather than hang about the reception and offend young impressionable souls.


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