The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered  |  Archives 
 
 
User: Guest

Home / Life  % width posts: 136

The Polish Wedding - What is it Like in Poland?


swinkoski 1 | 3
8 Sep 2009 #91
My family cam from Southern Poland
TwojPrestige - | 14
9 Sep 2009 #92
So, there's a lot of Goralian or countryside customs.
The most important or usual:
1.when bride and room leave a church after the ceremony they have to be rain of grain (oat) which ensure them a lot of children.

2. At the midnight, during the wedding party, the'y organise "ocepiny" what means that the bride stops to be a Miss and start to be a Ms ;) It can take even an hour if it's reali lied to tradition. But usual the bride blasts her veil and that single woman which catch it will be married during one year (the same for single mens, but groom blast his tie).

Southern Poland - mountain - wedding reception can take even a week and be prepared even for 300 (yes, 3 hundred) people.
NPosuniak 8 | 91
9 Sep 2009 #93
On a semi-related side note. Don't see a movie called Polish Wedding with Claire Daines. It is not good and has very little to do with Poles/Polish Weddings.
swinkoski 1 | 3
10 Sep 2009 #94
If this wedding reception takes a week What other gatherings are there? I am marrying someone from a different culture and we are combining the two for our families.
krakuskabanos 4 | 43
23 Sep 2009 #95
f this wedding reception takes a week What other gatherings are there?

it's just for two days, including the wedding day.
Nicolee - | 4
4 Mar 2010 #96
Hi, Can anyone help me with information on an Irish-Polish wedding. My fiance(polish) and I(Irish) are planning to get married. We have both agreed to tie the knot in her home town in Poland. The problem is that we are unsure about the wedding ceremony language. How we can have both polish and english mixed into the ceremony. Has anyone been at a wedding with that had both Polish and English languages spoken.

I would appreciate any help on this.

Kind Regards

nexteve.com
TwojPrestige - | 14
9 Apr 2010 #97
Usually the ceremony is half Polish-half English (accually more Polish than English ;)). The swear can be only in English or as Polish, as English.
Nicolee - | 4
10 May 2010 #98
Next October, 2010, I will be getting married. My fiance was born in Poland but moved to the US at the age of two. His parents also live here in the US but the majority of his family still lives in Poland. While my fiance was growing up the spoken language in his home has always been Polish. I'm slowly trying to learn the language myself because I appreciate his culture and want it to be important in our life together. My question for you is about special Polish traditions that I could incorporate into my wedding day. I know my mother-in-law-to-be would greatly appreciate that I made an meaningful effort. These traditions could be anything from Polish foods to quotations and sayings... whatever! Thank you in advance!
TwojPrestige - | 14
7 Jun 2010 #99
One of the most important elements in the Polish wedding tradition are so called "oczepiny", which symbolises the transition of the bride from a girls into a married women by taking off her wedding veil. It always takes place at midnight. Today “oczepiny” are rather short and funny entertainments, however in traditional weddings it could take up to an hour.
polishmama 3 | 279
10 Dec 2010 #100
I am currently writing a blog and I just recently wrote about my experience going for the first time to a Polish wedding...

polishmamaontheprairie.blogspot.com/2010/12/once-upon-polish-wedding.html

If you enjoy reading it, feel free to check out my other posts, perhaps even spreading the word!
delphiandomine 88 | 18,456
10 Dec 2010 #101
One of the most important elements in the Polish wedding tradition are so called "oczepiny", which symbolises the transition of the bride from a girls into a married women by taking off her wedding veil. It always takes place at midnight. Today “oczepiny” are rather short and funny entertainments, however in traditional weddings it could take up to an hour.

It's only important with villagers.
polishmama 3 | 279
14 Dec 2010 #102
Every country and culture has some sort of ceremony in their weddings to show the woman has become a wife. In the US they throw their garter. Or do you think it's only the "villagers" there, too? Stop trying to turn helpful threads into negativity.
convex 20 | 3,978
14 Dec 2010 #103
It seems to be more of an observation of the shift in traditions than a turn towards negativity. Things are a changing.
guesswho 4 | 1,289
14 Dec 2010 #104
The Polish Wedding - What is it Like?

I don't know how it is in other parts of Poland but I was invited once to a Wedding party in Radzyn Podlaski and it was funny as hell. After a while everyone got wasted and later on they started fighting with each other. Police and Emergency came, picked up few guys and it was the end of the whole party. I was told that it is normal and that the party will continue the next day. I didn't go, it was enough "amusement" for me.
landora - | 199
14 Dec 2010 #105
Every country and culture has some sort of ceremony in their weddings to show the woman has become a wife. In the US they throw their garter. Or do you think it's only the "villagers" there, too? Stop trying to turn helpful threads into negativity.

He's right though, the tradition came from the countryside. I won't have it, as it was never traditional in my family.
Wroclaw Boy
14 Dec 2010 #106
it was funny as hell. After a while everyone got wasted and later on they started fighting with each other. Police and Emergency came, picked up few guys and it was the end of the whole party.

I didn't go, it was enough "amusement" for me.

There's something very wrong with you girl.
guesswho 4 | 1,289
14 Dec 2010 #107
I know, you would most likely enjoy it more as Brits are known to love parties where they can get wasted (especially for free) and fight.
enkidu 7 | 623
14 Dec 2010 #108
Well - a good Polish wedding without at least one good fight is a shame! :-)

On my wedding one guy has tried to run over the other one by a car (they just want to resolve the question which vodka is the best one). Because the driver was drunk - he just hit the tree.

The other guests concluded that there is too much noise, so they throw the fighters into the lake.

And then everyone resume to be merry and drunk.
Oh - memories...
guesswho 4 | 1,289
14 Dec 2010 #109
Well - a good Polish wedding without at least one good fight is a shame! :-)

This is exactly was I was told that night.
Wroclaw Boy
14 Dec 2010 #110
Brits are known to love parties where they can get wasted (especially for free)

Who doesnt? on the other hand unless their complete ******** the present would have more than paid for the free booze.

Well - a good Polish wedding without at least one good fight is a shame!

From a spectators point of view..

Free loaders at weddings annoy me. If its a large wedding most of the attendants are only there for a night out.
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,883
14 Dec 2010 #111
Polish weddings, like anything else, depend on who's throwing the party.

I've been to some lamo polish weddings and i've been to some awesome ones. My wedding in Poland was completely amazing, if I may say so ;)

My oczepiny lasted for quite a while, but it's good in a way because at midnight people start getting sleepy from all the vodka so it acts as a little pick me up, assuming the games you play aren't lame.

Definitely go with a live band. My wedding went till 5:00 a.m. and having a live band really made a difference. I can't imagine if I got stuck with a DJ spinning disco polo all night.
guesswho 4 | 1,289
14 Dec 2010 #112
Who doesnt?

Due to the facts presented on PF, Brits are behaving pretty bad when wasted. I never seen anyone peeing on Washington's monument (or any other monument) here.

Definitely go with a live band.

Good that you've mentioned the band, lol The drummer (at the party I was at) was so drunk that he peed in his pants and fell of the stage, lol
Hiltiboy 3 | 19
14 Dec 2010 #113
aPole
Polish weddings, the way you have described are very similar to the ones we have in Goa, India. It is the almost the same. In the end they will sing "Viva re viva"
Ciesielska 1 | 3
10 Jun 2011 #114
Polish wedding traditions!!

I am due to marry my Polish fiance in October & I am wanting to bring in some polish traditions. I'm aware of the one where his Mother gives us bread & we have to pick one of 2 shots one is water & one is vodka or something like that. If anyone has any others or can explain that one a bit more to me I would be very grateful :)

Thanks :)
Bzibzioh
10 Jun 2011 #115
I'm aware of the one where his Mother gives us bread & we have to pick one of 2 shots one is water & one is vodka or something like that.

It must be some local tradition; I never heard of this and I'm Polish.

There is blessing by parents before you go to the church. And welcoming young couple with bread and salt at the beginning of the wedding party. And ocepiny.
Ciesielska 1 | 3
10 Jun 2011 #116
There is blessing by parents before you go to the church

In England the bride & groom aren't supposed to see each other till they get to the church & that's one thing I won't be backing down on as it's important to me but my fiance said they have a piece of special bread then he has to pick a shot glass & I have the other ie one of us has water the other vodka!! :)

This is supposed to happen before we go into the reception, also I was told that the groom doesn't drink on his wedding day is that true because that doesn't seem very Polish :D
Bzibzioh
10 Jun 2011 #117
In England the bride & groom aren't supposed to see each other till they get to the church & that's one thing I won't be backing down on as it's important to me

well, that's one example of traditions clashing. For us the parent's blessing is an important part. But your wedding - your call.

I was told that the groom doesn't drink on his wedding day is that true because that doesn't seem very Polish :D

Definitely not before the ceremony but at the reception is another story :)
Ella_15 - | 1
30 Nov 2011 #118
Merged: Polish wedding traditions

Hi everybody!
I'm marrying a Polak in June. He not's not know of any Polish weddind traditions, other than getting drunk, LOL! I would like to incorperate some traditions in our wedding if we can. My family has none, so I'd like to adopt some. Any suggestions?
up and at them - | 3
3 Jan 2012 #119
Hi ( Learning), Generally people go home for a few hours if they are not living too far away or stay with friends and relatives in the area

hey marcus just reading ur post there , im taking the step myself end of the year , looks like u had amazing day

jus wondering how ya got on with bands to suit both parties , or did ya just go with the polka trad . night ... kinda trying to plan everythin out , the second day do u keep the same venue or do ya book some where else , more often than not now in western europe ie ire ,uk the second day is just as important , booking out other venue ,pubs or resturants ,

if u could drop us a pm could do with a name of a good band an any info really on the day , the mrs to be is looking after most of it , but im keen on getting the music department right . cheers in advance
MinaD 1 | 25
6 Mar 2012 #120
Merged: Traditional Polish Wedding?

Hello everyone :) I am hoping sometime in the future to marry in Poland and was wondering of any particular Polish wedding customs?
I checked on the internet but some websites seemed to contradict each other.
Can anyone help? :)


Home / Life / The Polish Wedding - What is it Like in Poland?
BoldItalic [quote]
 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary username or login and post as a member.