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Polish vs British vs American - Clash of cultures


OP pawian 161 | 9,971
19 Dec 2012 #211
'Wide open spaces' does not automatically equal 'flat'. It also means

Ok, but even with that correction your picture of a mountain lake cannot be classified as a wide open space! :):):):) To be honest, it is quite the opposite - I know people who would consider your site very claustrophobic. :):):)

Look here what is commonly associated with the phrase:
google.pl/search?hl=pl&biw=1221&bih=675&q=wide+open+space&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.&bpcl=40096503&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi&ei=xhzSUPSyH9KO4gStqoCQBw

Still, open or not, wide or narrow, Poland offers similar sights. :):):):):)

But this isn`t the thread for such discussion and please stop, because each next post might be considered off topic.

Or not? Hey, I have an idea for another clash...... :):):):)
TommyG 1 | 361
19 Dec 2012 #212
No country in Europe will ever compare to the wide open spaces of Canada, the US and Australia.

Now that is a shame for all those agoraphobic Americans...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agoraphobia
Approximately 3.2 million, or about 2.2%, of adults in the US between the ages of 18 and 54, suffer from agoraphobia.[5] Agoraphobia can account for approximately 60% of phobias.[6] Studies have shown two different age groups at first onset: early to mid twenties, and early thirties.[7]
TheOther 5 | 3,878
19 Dec 2012 #213
your picture of a mountain lake cannot be classified as a wide open space

Scroll down your Google search results ... mountain lakes ...

Still, open or not, wide or narrow, Poland offers similar sights.

Have you ever been to one of the places I've mentioned? If not, try it (for example Alaska or the Kimberleys in Australia) and then we'll talk again. Being in a real wilderness is something you have to experience at least once in your lifetime. And no, Poland doesn't offer that - you'll need to go further East for that.

Now that is a shame for all those agoraphobic Americans

I see that more pragmatic: less tourists on the road, more peace and quiet for me... :)
OP pawian 161 | 9,971
19 Dec 2012 #214
Have you ever been to one of the places I've mentioned? If not, try it (for example Alaska or the Kimberleys in Australia) and then we'll talk again.

I don`t need to go to Alaska or Australia. It is enough to go to the Table Mountains in Poland. I am planning a trip next summer :):):):)

Being in a real wilderness is something you have to experience at least once in your lifetime. And no, Poland doesn't offer that - you'll need to go further East for that.

Sorry, but it seems your knowledge of Poland is very superficial.
TheOther 5 | 3,878
19 Dec 2012 #215
Sorry, I don`t need to go to Alaska or Australia.

Go out and expand your horizons!. You're missing so much if you're always staying in the same country. Another clash of cultures?

It is enough to go to the Table Mountains in Poland.

You have photos?

but it seems your knowledge of Poland is very superficial.

You don't know what real wilderness means, Pawian. The suburbs of Warsaw don't count... :)
OP pawian 161 | 9,971
19 Dec 2012 #216
Go out and expand your horizons!.

Sorry, I am not so interested. :):):) Thank you, anyway.

You have photos?

You have google? :):):):)

You don't know what real wilderness means, Pawian.

Of course, but I don`t think you do, either. :):):) You spend too much time in virtual reality. :):):):) Virtual traveller...... quite easy...
TheOther 5 | 3,878
19 Dec 2012 #217
but I don`t think you do, either.

I'm from Australia, my friend. 'nough said.

You have google?

I thought you've been to the Table Mountains and would be willing to share some pictures. Ah well, Google it is.

You spend too much time in virtual reality.

Hey, I agree. :)
OP pawian 161 | 9,971
19 Dec 2012 #218
I'm from Australia, my friend. 'nough said.

Should I kneel down now? :):):):):)

I thought you've been to the Table Mountains a

Didn`t you read I am planning a trip next summer???

pawian: You spend too much time in virtual reality.
Hey, I agree. :)

Are you retired?
TheOther 5 | 3,878
19 Dec 2012 #219
Should I kneel down now?

Not necessary, but you can go and get me a drink instead.

Are you retired?

No, but running my own business. I decide when I work and when I waste my time on PF... :)
OP pawian 161 | 9,971
19 Dec 2012 #220
Not necessary, but you can go and get me a drink instead.

Why not? What do you fancy?

No, but running my own business. :)

It isn`t too big if you can`t hire a secretary..... :):):):):)
TheOther 5 | 3,878
19 Dec 2012 #221
What do you fancy?

That's easy: Żubrówka.
OP pawian 161 | 9,971
19 Dec 2012 #222
Aaaah... memories of the wilderness!!! Good! :):):):)

Ok, I will show you the Table Mountains where I want to spend next summer. Check in a new thread and let`s leave this one alone or we will lose our precious posts.

Is this clash still valid?
In Britain, a formal boss adresses his secretery, called Kate Smith, as Miss/Mrs Smith.

In Poland, he says Panno/Pani Kasiu - Miss/Mrs Kate.
jon357 63 | 14,255
8 Jan 2013 #223
In Britain, a formal boss adresses his secretery, called Kate Smith, as Miss/Mrs Smith.

Probably not much during my lifetime and not at all nowadays.

Hard to imagine anyone using 'Panno' in an office nowadays, and even in formal workplaces here I suspect there isn't much Pan and Pani among colleagues.
Lenka 3 | 1,514
8 Jan 2013 #224
even in formal workplaces here I suspect there isn't much Pan and Pani among colleagues.

There still is.Maybe not in international companies but in all Polish staff for sure Pan/Pani is still in order
OP pawian 161 | 9,971
8 Jan 2013 #225
Jon, you misunderstood my intention. My primary clash focus was on using surnames by Brits and first names by Poles when formally addressing people. The title form doesn`t matter here, really.
pam
8 Jan 2013 #226
Here in the UK, women don't have a Gynaecologist as a matter of routine.
If us women ever have a problem, we go to see our doctor, or possibly a sexual health clinic.
If a woman has a problem that needs further investigation, only then would a doctor refer her to a Gynaecologist.
Apparently, so my friend tells me, in Poland women have an annual check up with their Gynaecologist, and a scan of their reproductive organs!
The Gynaecologist also looks after them throughout pregnancy.
The fact that the UK doesn't do this, has come of something as a shock to my friend. She sees the yearly scan as being essential to check for things like Ovarian cysts.

Tbh, it sounds like a good idea, but I can't see it happening over here, as it would put too much of a burden on our NHS.

Strange, but true clash of cultures!
zetigrek
8 Jan 2013 #227
You see, pam, contraceptive pills can be perscribed only by a gynaecologist, that's why Polish women see a doctor regularly.
pam
8 Jan 2013 #228
My friend raised this subject because someone she knows living here, has a large Ovarian cyst and now needs surgery to remove it.
Had her friend been living back in Poland, and had a routine scan, chances are it would have been detected before it got that big.

I was aware that you could get the contraceptive pill from Gynaecologists, but I'm sure women don't only go just for that reason?
Bieganski 17 | 901
8 Jan 2013 #229
Is this clash still valid?
In Britain, a formal boss adresses his secretery, called Kate Smith, as Miss/Mrs Smith.

In some formal settings this takes place but I wouldn't say it is universal. It is somewhat generational and just depends on the place of work and who is around. Some bosses will address their subordinates by their first name while they in turn are expected to address the boss as Mr. (Surname) or Ms/Mrs (Surname). This protocol establishes and maintains a power relationship of who is in charge and who follows. In the presence of clients or visitors the boss may or may not use the first names of subordinates. Sometimes both. For example, you may hear a boss say something like "Mr. Pawian, thank you for stopping by, my secretary Miss Smith will show you out. And then within a moment he will pick up the phone and say "Kate, please show Mr. Pawian the way out."

Of course, when the boss isn't around, the staff will refer to him or her by their first name amongst each other (and usually accompanied by or substituted with a term of abuse).

It also depends on how large an organization is and how long people have been around. When people get promoted over others but stay in the same office or building most will still call each other by their first names. But it is more common today for people to dispense with formalities. Bosses are trained now to develop trust with their staff so they will insist on everyone including themselves addressing each other on a first name basis only. Sometimes in these settings when people get in trouble or can no longer stand working with each other they often revert to using Mr. (Surname) or Ms/Mrs (Surname) to establish distance and demonstrate that they don't want to play the fake social game of "we are a team and love each other very much here at work so lets call each other by our first names."

I heard that in parts of America (particularly the South) some blacks will address others in the workplace as "Miss Kate" (even if she is married) or "Mr. Steve". It doesn't necessarily correspond to situations when a person has a long or difficult surname to pronounce. The usage appears to be an attempt to combine informality with a subtle showing of respect and is usually reserved for a direct supervisor or an older colleague or well known customer. However, some blacks do not approve of other blacks using this convention since they regarded it as self-subordinating and from a bygone era.
OP pawian 161 | 9,971
9 Jan 2013 #230
Mr Biegański, thank you very much for the thorough elucidation of the issue.

I heard that in parts of America (particularly the South) some blacks will address others in the workplace as "Miss Kate" (even if she is married) or "Mr. Steve".

Interesting. Is it in any way connected with the style of addressing British noblemen with Sir and first name?

Why does Sir Henry loose two boots in London?
(A) The hotel staff conspires against him
(B) The hotel staff steals expensive footwear
(C) Mrs. Stapleton wanted to tip Henry off to her husband's scheme
(D) Stapleton needed the scent from an old boot to lure his hound

Bieganski 17 | 901
9 Jan 2013 #231
Interesting. Is it in any way connected with the style of addressing British noblemen with Sir and first name?

That I cannot say with certainty. I only heard about blacks in some regions of America still using this convention in the modern era. However, there are links to the past which could make this possible since most if not all plantation owners in America's days of slavery had Anglo-Scots-Irish surnames. Britain was also heavily involved as a firm third leg of the slave triangle so Americans obviously continued to have contact with the British; therefore knowledge of their customs would have been maintained. Although Americans never were permitted to hold noble titles themselves it only stands to reason that British customs were adapted and passed down along generations of Americans with British roots or British contacts. Perhaps slave owning whites once made their slaves and servants address them with such titles and this may be why I also heard that some blacks do not approve of its use. Since the "n-word" survived I wouldn't be surprised if other cultural aspects of those shameful days are still around today.

Why does Sir Henry loose two boots in London?

I'll choose: (D) Stapleton needed the scent from an old boot to lure his hound.
jon357 63 | 14,255
9 Jan 2013 #232
Interesting. Is it in any way connected with the style of addressing British noblemen with Sir and first name?

On a side note, people called 'Sir Whatever' aren't usually noblemen, just gentry.

Re, your question, at the time the Southern US was settled by British people, in a family of quality, servants and outsiders would have referred to adults other than the head of the family as Mr John, Miss Jane etc. This continued into the Twentieth Century, but would only be used in exceptionally formal occasions today. The practice is similar to that of Geman aristocracy, where the head of the household is der Graf Von Scheissenhaus but his son, daughter, brother, sister etc is Graf Herman, Grafin Helga etc.
MarcinD 4 | 135
9 Jan 2013 #233
The two white males pushed to the back. This interracial crap is shoved in my face on a hourly basis in the USA.
kondzior 9 | 954
9 Jan 2013 #234
Christian woman fined for seeking christian roomate in USA
foxnews.com/us/2010/10/22/civil-rights-complaint-filed-christian-roommate-advertisement

A civil rights complaint has been filed against a woman in Grand Rapids, Mich., who posted an advertisement at her church last July seeking a Christian roommate.

The ad 'expresses an illegal preference for a Christian roommate, thus excluding people of other faiths, ' according to the complaint filed by the Fair Housing Center of West Michigan.

My head is spinning. This is a serious madness of the USA...
It's illegal to decide what kind of people you wish to live with?

No, seriously. From my perspective it sounds pretty messed up. Could any of our resident lefists explain it to me?

Living cooped up together, why shouldn't you be allowed to be as discriminatory as you like? Next should they regulate against choosing who you want to have sex with?
Satchkat - | 20
9 Jan 2013 #235
Oooh the gynaecologist! I've been living in the UK for over 6 years and the fact that one can't just go to have their chickparts checked was a shocker. I still don't feel comfortable with it and I probably never will - expecially that a smear test is done only once every 3 years as opposed to once a year, or twice even in some cases in PL.

Call me naive, but only recently I started noticing cultural differences I struggle with. To my excuse, those past 6 years have beena bit of a rollercoaster for me and 2 of them I can't remember due to depression, but hey... It's better late than never!

I'm new btw. Be gentle.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,671
9 Jan 2013 #236
the fact that one can't just go to have their chickparts checked

as a regular thing? sorry but to me that is just .....odd, as though being a woman were a disease?
Satchkat - | 20
9 Jan 2013 #237
as a regular thing? sorry but to me that is just .....odd

Yeah... At least once every six months. Like someone here said, it can save a lot of hassle and prevents sh*t hitting the fan. A lot can happen in 3 years!
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,671
9 Jan 2013 #238
At least once every six months

seriously ?
what do you think they will find up there? fungus or teeth or something?
you know that's not for your benefit right? it is for the benefit of perverted gynaecologists who want to control the dangerous vagina
as part of the patriarchal system?
Just saying.
zetigrek
9 Jan 2013 #239
what do you think they will find up there? fungus or teeth or something?

erosion.

it is for the benefit of perverted gynaecologists who want to control the dangerous vagina as part of the patriarchal system?

ww-w-what??
Ant63 11 | 403
9 Jan 2013 #240
Oooh the gynaecologist! I've been living in the UK for over 6 years and the fact that one can't just go to have their chickparts checked was a shocker.

You can if you pay

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