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Polish vs British vs American - Clash of cultures


hudsonhicks 21 | 346    
18 Sep 2012  #61
no when i was 18..

anyone care to challenge my claims of employment or whatever, pm me your facebook and i'll add you and you can have a nice nosey though all my photos. i don't care
OP pawian 144 | 7,546    
19 Sep 2012  #62
no when i was 18..

Still great.

Poles love wild mushroom hunting, while Ams and Brits - don`t. Germans - do, but only a little.

The view that makes most Poles` heart pound with exhiliration - a basket full of noble mushrooms from Boletus family.

Contest!

Pickles!

Children are taught to pick up good mushrooms since preschool.

s

That is why fatal cases of mushroom poisoning amount to only about 10 annually.

Advice:

If some photos don`t load after opening the page, click the refresh button F5.


a basket full of noble mushrooms from Boletus family.

Sorry, bol, I didn`t mean your family, of course.
boletus 30 | 1,367    
19 Sep 2012  #63
If some photos don`t load after opening the page, click the refresh button F5.

Just a wee reminder: not everyone lives in the Microsoft world. :-)
In OSX the corresponding default shortcut is Command + R, but you can reassign F5 to do this as well in your System Preferences >> Keyboard Shortcuts >> Keyboard & Text input. My F5 does something more useful, Pawian. :-)
OP pawian 144 | 7,546    
19 Sep 2012  #64
Funny!:):):)

You talk about Apple systems. I saw a modern Apple computer at a student of mine`s a few years ago, you know, this model with a ROM-drive built in the monitor. Then I learned the drive got broken and its repair would cost a fortune,so they bought an ordinary PC. :):):):)
boletus 30 | 1,367    
20 Sep 2012  #65
They are still more expensive than PC, but they do not cost a fortune anymore. However, I always pay a fortune for my computers, regardless what operating system it is. For me they are the tools, not just toys, so I always need and pay some extra. My first computer cost me CDN $ 13,000 - almost as much as my first car, Toyota Tercel ($7000 + 25% interest rate). It had 4 Mb extra memory (yes, megabytes, not gigabytes, not terabytes) and 1 Mb cost then 860 Canadian dollars. People criticized me then: why do you need so much memory, and what is this sh1t about email and FTP? :-)

I was a long time user of Linux and I only switched to Apple because I have become lazy. With Linux I was a user + an administrator 100% of the time, with Apple I am just a user. The command "uptime", displayed right now on my onscreen terminal, shows that I have been running this machine for 31 days, 19:29 hours without rebooting. I usually reboot with some system-related upgrades, not when I just add new browser or some other such application. That's lazy for you.
rybnik 18 | 1,466    
20 Sep 2012  #66
That is why fatal cases of mushroom poisoning amount to only about 10 annually.

Train them young; train them well = low # of poisonings..........Great Job!

The view that makes most Poles` heart pound with exhiliration - a basket full of noble mushrooms from Boletus family.

Right!
My dad used to take me mushroom picking all the time when I was a boy. (those are beautiful shrooms btw)
czar 1 | 143    
20 Sep 2012  #67
i made a kielbasa hotdog slice it in half with a half sour pickle sliced in half...together they make a whole and i eat two on a potato roll with hot sauce, true story.
rybnik 18 | 1,466    
20 Sep 2012  #68
sounds simple and delicious!
ilmc 4 | 136    
  20 Sep 2012  #69
British double taps

haha my childhood home in canada had double taps...but they are hard to find here nowadays
aphrodisiac 11 | 2,445    
  20 Sep 2012  #70
but they are hard to find here nowadays

not true, I have a friend in TO, whose apartment downtown still has them, plus a really big sink. They look like they were built in the 70s, but don't appear to be run down. Good quality goes a long way:D

Back on topic. Nice harvest. I need to go into the woods this weekend.
ilmc 4 | 136    
20 Sep 2012  #71
oh yes you can still find them in homes but to buy them in order to install them in your own would be difficult is what i meant in britain apparently they can still purchase them and install them in newly built homes...
OP pawian 144 | 7,546    
  20 Sep 2012  #72
British guys aren`t as prudish and reserved as Poles. Some Brits who visit Poland love taking off their clothes and running all over the place naked, to the shock of natives. Pity it is a male performance only.

patrz.pl/filmy/nagi-brytyjczyk-na-rynku-w-krakowie

You certainly heard about Prince Harry and Kate M. having photos taken of and published in magazines. Shouldn`t Poles learn from Brits how to enjoy life in a relaxed, easy going manner? I think we are too stiff.
Wroclaw 44 | 5,392    
20 Sep 2012  #73
I think we are too stiff.

pardon !
OP pawian 144 | 7,546    
  21 Sep 2012  #74
Of course, I didn`t mean any of these:
n. Slang
1. A corpse.
[..]
3. A drunk.
4. A person: a lucky stiff; just an ordinary working stiff.
5. A hobo; a tramp.
6. A person who tips poorly.


I meant

4.
a. Rigidly formal.
b. Lacking ease or grace.


2. A person regarded as constrained, priggish, or overly formal.

thefreedictionary.com/stiff
Wroclaw 44 | 5,392    
21 Sep 2012  #75
Brits who visit Poland love taking off their clothes and running all over the place naked,

I think we are too stiff.

stiff = penile erection

so, we end up with a humorous comment in your post above.
OP pawian 144 | 7,546    
  21 Sep 2012  #76
stiff = penile erection

Yes, it is the same in the Polish language. :):):):)

Yes, you are right, the guy in the photo wasn`t stiff.

Adult class at uni. Doing exercises in an English textbook. Two groups. Both propose "must" as a right answer to fill in the blank:

Foreign languages are necessary. You ........... learn at least one.

while the key suggests: :"should."

Poles are stricter than the British?
delphiandomine 85 | 17,470    
29 Sep 2012  #77
Poles are stricter than the British?

I think it's probably more not feeling the difference between "should" and "must" ;)

I was actually explaining this to someone the other day, that "must" should only be used when it is absolutely required without dissent - for instance, you must not enter a military training ground.
OP pawian 144 | 7,546    
29 Sep 2012  #78
I think it's probably more not feeling the difference between "should" and "must" ;)

No, they knew the meaning of both.

I was actually explaining this to someone the other day, that "must" should only be used when it is absolutely required without dissent - for instance, you must not enter a military training ground.

Yes! My adult learners used "must" being fully aware it suggest an absolute requirement! :):):) When I started laughing and explained why, they claimed that learning languages is a must and they tell it to their children every day. :):):):)
polonius 56 | 421    
30 Sep 2012  #79
What are silver fish, please?
jon357 65 | 14,419    
30 Sep 2012  #80
Look in your kitchen cupboard.
polonius 56 | 421    
30 Sep 2012  #81
Very interesting UK-EU chart. Is the classic British understatemtn still alive and well in the UK? The traditonal Polish sterotype of the primaand proper Englihsman wearing a bowlker hat and hurrying off to 5 o'clock tea has been badly battered by Brit stag partyers coming toi Poland.
Orpheus - | 115    
30 Sep 2012  #82
I was actually explaining this to someone the other day, that "must" should only be used when it is absolutely required without dissent - for instance, you must not enter a military training ground.

There's also the use of must when recommending something, e.g. "You must see that film, you'd love it."

Foreign languages are necessary. You ........... learn at least one.

while the key suggests: :"should."

Because there is no absolute requirement or obligation to do so. It's just a good idea.
OP pawian 144 | 7,546    
30 Sep 2012  #83
Because there is no absolute requirement or obligation to do so. It's just a good idea.

Yes, the British feel so.

But Poles feel different.

Hence, a clash. :):):)
Magdalena 3 | 1,837    
30 Sep 2012  #84
Foreign languages are necessary. You ........... learn at least one.

I personally think the choice of "must" was largely influenced by the preceding "necessary".

"Foreign languages are useful. You should learn at least one." A natural choice of "should".

So I think the person / people who wrote the test are to blame, actually ;-)

They MUST be punished!
Orpheus - | 115    
30 Sep 2012  #85
Yes, the British feel so.

Q. What do you call a person who speaks several languages?
A. Multi-lingual. A polyglot.

Q. What do you call a person who speaks two languages?
A. Bilingual.

Q. What do you call a person who speaks one language?
A. British.

It's getting better. Slowly.
jon357 65 | 14,419    
30 Sep 2012  #86
Just as the traditional British stereotype of Poles as honourable, cultured and hardworking has been battered by the Poles who who came to the UK only to make a beeline for the dole office and hang around street corners.
Orpheus - | 115    
30 Sep 2012  #87
I personally think the choice of "must" was largely influenced by the preceding "necessary".

Good point.
OP pawian 144 | 7,546    
30 Sep 2012  #88
battered by the Poles who who came to the UK only to make a beeline for the dole office and hang around street corners.

You must be joking, jon. I can hardly believe it. It is not Poles, it is certain minorities which lived in Poland but prefered to move to Britain and today they pretend Polish. Simple.
jon357 65 | 14,419    
30 Sep 2012  #89
And gosh, they're good at pretending ;-)
OP pawian 144 | 7,546    
30 Sep 2012  #90
It isn`t difficult to impersonate a Pole:

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