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Polish vs British vs American - Clash of cultures


Satchkat - | 20    
9 Jan 2013  #241
erosion.

Exactly. Which also can progress very quickly and leave us, poor females, with lovely little cancer. Srsly.
I'm taking the patriarchal vagina control as a joke of course.

You can if you pay

Of course - but while seeing a health professional privately is affordable in PL, it's ridiculously expensive in UK.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,679    
9 Jan 2013  #242
I'm taking the patriarchal vagina control as a joke of course.

only half joking.....:) - show me a male gynaecologist and i will show you a weird pervert...
Satchkat - | 20    
9 Jan 2013  #243
Sorry, I never thought of taking photos :(

In general I think that a male gyneacologist is somewhat out of place due to one simple fact - men don't have vaginas and the rest of the funparts. I'm not ashamed of a male doctor of any sort, but I've heard a lot about blokes ignoring some health complaints . I don't think a male doctor can fully...erm...relate. But that's OT.

Another difference that I think was already mentioned here - the drinking culture. Brits go to pubs after work and there's nothing strange about that here. In Poland, there's no pub culture and there's no need for a "local". Also, a man going out for a pint nearly every night would be considered a menel. I'm presuming majority is familiar with that word, let me know if not. Poles may be heavy drinkers, but they drink mostly on Friday/Saturday nights and at special occassions, social gatherings and the boozing is stretched over time, there's food, dancing, talking etc. Brits drink for the sole purpose of getting drunk.

Of course any students of any nation will drink like there's no tomorrow.
jon357 64 | 14,382    
9 Jan 2013  #244
In general I think that a male gyneacologist is somewhat out of place

A decade of training suggests they are very far from 'out of place'. You may as well say there shouldn't be a male midwife, or a female urologist.

In Poland, there's no pub culture and there's no need for a "local". Also, a man going out for a pint nearly every night would be considered a menel.

Would you really prefer a village or community to have no secular focal point and for people to drink alcohol at home, either alone or in little groups?

I remember taking my Polish partner to the UK for a visit, years before Poland's EU entry. He was amazed and impressed that people of all ages and both sexes were there, that people were chatting to people at other tables, even to people they didn't know and that very old ladies were a. in the pub at all and b. tapping their feet to the rock band who played.
Satchkat - | 20    
9 Jan 2013  #245
A decade of training suggests they are very far from 'out of place'.

I didn't mean that in a sexist way. I meant that certain symptoms can't be experienced by men, therefore they can't properly relate. I didn't say anything about male doctors being less educated.

Would you really prefer a village or community to have no secular focal point and for people to drink alcohol at home, either alone or in little groups?

Eh? What are you on about? I never expressed any opinion of this sort, I simply compared those two and said what the culture is. UK is a pub culture. PL is not. No judgment on either.
OP pawian 151 | 7,977    
9 Jan 2013  #246
Has this book been ever mentioned in the PF?

[i]Carp in the Bathtub, Throttled Buglers, and other Tales of an Englishman in Poland

Are you travelling to Poland, and wish to know more about the Poles you'll encounter? Are you fascinated by this country of forty million, rich in natural beauty, cultured, and famous for its people's wanderlust? Have you ever wondered what makes your Polish plumber or waitress or doctor over here tick? What book do you pick for background and insight? A superficial travel guide? A dry history book? No! You need the genre-busting Polska Dotty. Follow the hilarious exploits of a newly-wed English lad and Polish girl as they settle in Poland and encounter corrupt Polish police, counterfeit software sellers, and scammy private doctors.

Poland

An example of clash according to the author: Polish winters are deadly!

Indeed.

Stock Photo - Beautiful British countryside landscape in winter, Costwolds, England, UK

photo

Traditional Polish winter:

Winter in Poland

Polish winter
pam    
9 Jan 2013  #247
Has this book been ever mentioned in the PF?

Have you read it Pawian?
OP pawian 151 | 7,977    
9 Jan 2013  #248
I wish I had. I like humorous stories.
pam    
10 Jan 2013  #249
I'll let you know what it's like, i've just downloaded it.
I like humorous stories too:)
Bargain price of £1.99:):)
Lenka 2 | 1,063    
10 Jan 2013  #250
I'll let you know what it's like

I can't wait.I must know if it's worth buying :)
rybnik 18 | 1,462    
10 Jan 2013  #251
it is for the benefit of perverted gynaecologists who want to control the dangerous vagina
as part of the patriarchal system?

you're kidding right?

show me a male gynaecologist and i will show you a weird pervert...

huh?
why would you think that?
OP pawian 151 | 7,977    
10 Jan 2013  #252
To be honest, male gynaecologists should be paid extra for working in hard conditions.
alexnye 2 | 30    
10 Jan 2013  #253
Breeding Immigrants
Welfare Tourism
Incompetent foreign Doctors and Nurses

A system primarily designed to serve the British nation is now being bled dry by people from all over the world.
You can't expect a perfect service anymore.
OP pawian 151 | 7,977    
10 Jan 2013  #254
How does it conform to the subject matter of this thread, may I ask?
Satchkat - | 20    
10 Jan 2013  #255
Regarding funny books, I just ordered Xenophobe's Guide to Poles for my husband - the whole series is hilarious and very accurate. Whole £0.01 + £2.80 shipping on Amazon.

I'm seconding pawian in an attempt to be explained what alexnye had on his mind posting his precious observations here.
Lenka 2 | 1,063    
10 Jan 2013  #256
I just ordered Xenophobe's Guide to Poles for my husband

I love this book:)I can fully recomend it.
Satchkat - | 20    
10 Jan 2013  #257
Good stuff then! I'm looking forward to read it myself, too.
OP pawian 151 | 7,977    
10 Jan 2013  #258
Due to its size, it is rather a booklet.
rybnik 18 | 1,462    
10 Jan 2013  #259
I love this book:)I can fully recomend it.

I just ordered it myself!
Satchkat - | 20    
10 Jan 2013  #260
Due to its size, it is rather a booklet.

Have they downsized then? I read one years ago and it was A5 format.
OP pawian 151 | 7,977    
10 Jan 2013  #261
Mine is B6, the same as CD box.
Lenka 2 | 1,063    
10 Jan 2013  #262
Due to its size, it is rather a booklet.

True,but nevertheless I truly enjoyed it.

I just ordered it myself!

I hope you're going to like it :)

Have they downsized then? I read one years ago and it was A5 format.

It must have been really thin.

Mine is B6, the same as CD box.

Mine's the same.
Satchkat - | 20    
10 Jan 2013  #263
I hope you're going to like it :)

It was actually - 30 pages or so? Can't remember.
OP pawian 151 | 7,977    
10 Jan 2013  #264
60 in B6 format.
Lenka 2 | 1,063    
10 Jan 2013  #265
86 pages in the same format



OP pawian 151 | 7,977    
13 Jan 2013  #266
As for the mice, I tend to give them pots with blue crystals in.

s

In Poland, rodent poison is pink!

s

s
jon357 64 | 14,382    
13 Jan 2013  #267
The pink one looks almost tasty

;-)
OP pawian 151 | 7,977    
13 Jan 2013  #268
The pink one looks almost tasty

Yes, and I wonder what British rats think of that blue stuff they are offered. Aren`t they put off by its pretencious colour?? If I were them ,i would instantly smell a rat! Blue isn`t typical colour of food.
jon357 64 | 14,382    
13 Jan 2013  #269
Aren`t they put off by its pretencious colour

I expect they're colour-blind. That or they like blue things.
mcm1 2 | 81    
13 Jan 2013  #270
Rats are not highest on my list of experience but..........you are both about right.

Rats do not 'see' quite the same as us humans colourwise nor is their eyesight anywhere near as advanced, they search or hunt for food more by smell and the use of their 'whiskers'.

The reason the rat poison is dyed blue here in the UK is because as Pawian wrote 'Blue isn`t typical colour of food' therefore it is meant as a warning signal for us humans not to eat it,Poland believe their colour is more suitable as a warning.

Why choose these colours at all? because it is in the spectrum of colour that rats can see i.e. red, green and blue so poor old ratty hopefully gets his/her demise.

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