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I do not have parental responsibility for my Polish daughter. Am I obligated to pay child support?


donnakai
4 Dec 2013  #1
I have signed my rights of my daughter over to my ex polish wife who subsequently moved her to spain 10 years ago. she has now moved back to Poland and i am in the UK and demanding i pay her 10 years of child support back to her. what are my legal responsibilities for this.
Harry
4 Dec 2013  #2
Do you mean you haven't made any child support payments in the last ten years? If that is what you mean, I'd strongly suggest that you speak to a very good lawyer.
legate - | 46
4 Dec 2013  #3
hello, you're still obliged to pay child support but there are some boundaries.
OP donnakai
4 Dec 2013  #4
no she wanted me to sign my rights over as she was moving to spain but now is asking for it
Maybe 12 | 409
4 Dec 2013  #5
@OP I hear Vietnam and Cambodia one can live quite well on a reduced budget. Advice, sell everything and go discover Asian for the next ten years.

Avoidance of payment of child support can end up with an shortish HMP holiday, (a bit irritating) but much worse, she could potentially take ALOT of money from you. You are in Europe so the law can pretty much get you anywhere, I would as everyone else has said, get legal advice and quick, because she will be getting legal advice as well.
Marek11111 9 | 816
4 Dec 2013  #6
no she wanted me to sign my rights over as she was moving to spain but now is asking for it

what kind of sicko you are you allow someone to take your child away to different country not able to see or be involve with own child just so you do not have to pay and your greed will still come and bite you in a bud.
f stop 25 | 2,513
5 Dec 2013  #7
In US, if a custodial parent intiaties termination of parental rights of the other parent, and all paperwork is signed and approved, the custodial parents forfeits all the support for the child from the non-custodial parent.

What does the termination of parental rights mean in Poland??
kj99 8 | 54
5 Dec 2013  #8
yep , , but poland is poland , - and chancers like her are 10 a penny,

they will treat u like sh+t and let you no where near your kids ,expecting you to have nothing to do with em - maybe they will even ask u to "sign over" your rights so they dont have to come to you in the future for any signatures -

fair and fine enough ,
but ive learnt that its best not to sign over any rights in the 1st place - because no matter what , the little ( ( enter your choice of profanity here)) will still have designs upon your cash and i wrekin (under law)may well be entitled to it ... stinks dont it ?

fell sorry for you mate,
f stop 25 | 2,513
5 Dec 2013  #9
Termination of parental right is usually done if there are plans for someone else to adopt the child.
It cannot be reversed unless the non-custodial parent, that means you donnakai, petitions for it.
If all the papers were done correctly, and Polish law is not freakishly different in this regard, then you have nothing to worry about.
You are not under any legal financial obligation, especially not any back child support.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,681
5 Dec 2013  #10
you have parental responsibility unless a court removes it from you, you loser.
time to cough up i think.
f stop 25 | 2,513
5 Dec 2013  #11
unless a court removes it from you

that's what termination of parental rights is, genius.
Harry
5 Dec 2013  #12
You are not under any legal financial obligation, especially not any back child support.

That's very likely to be completely wrong.

that's what termination of parental rights is, genius.

You are confusing parental rights with parental responsibilities.
It is perfectly possible for somebody's parental rights to be completely cut off but for them to still have their parental responsibilities.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,681
5 Dec 2013  #13
that's what termination of parental rights is, genius.

there is no such thing as 'parental rights' - only children have rights, not parents.
and you cannot sign away parental responsibility on a whim, as I said , only a court can remove that.
and there is no need to be rude and unpleasant is there?
Harry
5 Dec 2013  #14
there is no such thing as 'parental rights' - only children have rights, not parents.

Under Polish law there is such a concept.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,681
5 Dec 2013  #15
what are "parental rights" then Harry? is a child considered a commodity?
and 'frd' look closely at the two words 'rights' and 'responsibilities' - study them carefully and you will see they are quite quite different.....
Harry
5 Dec 2013  #16
what are "parental rights" then Harry?

For example, the right to have a say in the child's education and the right to have a say in the child's medical treatment (both of which are rights which are usually retained even when visitation rights are cut off by the court).
f stop 25 | 2,513
5 Dec 2013  #17
unless a court removes it from you, you loser.

and there is no need to be rude and unpleasant is there?

I assume you're talking to yourself

I have signed my rights of my daughter over to my ex polish wife who subsequently moved her to spain 10 years ago

that sounds like termination of parental rights. AGAIN, if this was granted, your resposibilities, legaly, are finished. It's as if a child was adopted by someone else.

If you have doubts, dig up your papers and show it to a lawyer.
Or save your money and just wait until you receive any legal documents about the child support, which I doubt you will, and then get a lawyer.
Harry
5 Dec 2013  #18
f stop, given that you clearly know nothing about Polish law, perhaps you might like to stop giving advice?
Szarik
5 Dec 2013  #19
In Polish law one cannot give up parental rights. One can only give an permision for an adoption of a child, but only if the adoption comes into force fully, your parental rights and obligations cease to exist, as being taken over by a new parent.
f stop 25 | 2,513
6 Dec 2013  #20
f stop, given that you clearly know nothing about Polish law, perhaps you might like to stop giving advice?

how about you give your advice, and I give mine, and we each will stop whenever the fvck we choose to??

All right, he pushed a wrong button..
The real question is: does he start throwing the money at the lawyers now, or does he wait for legal action from the mother? He has no idea what has happened in the last 10 years. The child could have been adopted 3 times over. That said,

Harry, as much as I applaud your efforts trying to stomp on racists and anti semites here, you're no more qualified to offer legal advice than I am. To give extreme example of relinquishing parental obligations, I'm sure sperm donors are not obligated to child support, not even in Poland. Most reasonable courts will allow mother to relive the father of parental obligations, if he was no more than a sperm donor, did not want children, she's more than capable of supporting the child, or doesn't want to chase him around when she wants her new husband to adopt the child, etc. etc, the OP says he has one of those papers.

Interestingly, there is a movement, albeit not very popular, that in order for fathers to be responsible for their children, they should be given the same choices at the beginning of pregnancy that mothers have: abortion, adoption or keeping the baby.

So remember Harry, this is a discussion forum, you can offer your own opinions and supporting arguments, but then so can everyone else; right or wrong.
McDouche 6 | 286
6 Dec 2013  #21
There seems to be very opposing advice given in this thread. Unfortunately PF threads are like this a lot of times.

Although I am more likely to trust Harry on Polish law considering he does live in Poland.

Interesting thread though and I'm sure many might find it useful. Especially for those who get a Polish woman pregnant and want to know how to deal with the problems afterwards.
Harry
6 Dec 2013  #22
you're no more qualified to offer legal advice than I am.

Qualified I am not. Experienced I am. And I've been 'lucky' enough to learn a fair bit about family law in Poland during that experience.

Put simply, in Poland one cannot just walk away from one's parental responsibilities. The only way to escape them is for the court to remove them from you (in which case they are pretty much always given to somebody else, e.g. during adoption).

Most reasonable courts will allow mother to relive the father of parental obligations,

Not in Poland. And anyway, here an agreement between parents is not enough. I know of a 23-year old man here who is suing both of his parents for child support (the obligation to financially support a child extends to the age of 26, provided that said child is in full-time education).

A parent can most certainly voluntarily relinquish his/her rights, but not his/her responsibilities.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,681
6 Dec 2013  #23
full stop it just doesnt work like that, children are not possessions to be 'relinquished' on a whim, if you have a child and your name is on the birth cert, then you are financially and legally responsible for that child unless a court removes those responsibilities (not rights) from you for some very good reason. you cannot just sign them away.
f stop 25 | 2,513
6 Dec 2013  #24
ok guys, if I had the time and inclination, I could probably dig up more than one case where parental responsibility was successfully relinquished in Poland, but I don't really care that much. Therefore, I forfeit.

You guys crack me up. I stated my opinion and I'm done. You'd rather fight, huh?
McDouche 6 | 286
7 Dec 2013  #25
You guys crack me up

I think you cracked everyone else up the way you left this discussion.
Pooledogg 1 | 11
7 Dec 2013  #26
I think maybe you should not have children. Then you don't have to worry about the responsibility, but unfortunately you did.
kj99 8 | 54
7 Dec 2013  #27
perhaps he didnt choose 2 have them ? - perhaps his wife / partner took the decision not 2 abort? - perhaps the decision wasnt his in the 1st place?
Pooledogg 1 | 11
8 Dec 2013  #28
Given that abortion is illegal in Poland I'm not surprised.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,681
8 Dec 2013  #29
perhaps his wife / partner took the decision not 2 abort? -

abortion is not birth control.
it takes two to tango y know...
kj99 8 | 54
8 Dec 2013  #30
and one not to use the pill , n one to "do herself manually" -( don't ask ..) , n one not to give a guy any choices , a man may choose to use a condom - everytime ... but the

bottom line is ,if a woman wants to get pregnant , she WILL get pregnant and WILL still expect you to pay for HER choice ....


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