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Polish Swear Words


z_darius 14 | 3,973    
4 Apr 2008  #751
najebać kogoś - to beat somebody up

not "komuś" ?

what is cigaret in polish

A few of those. Mine may be oldies:

szlug (kopsnij szluga, give me a cig)
fajka (also means a pipe)
Guest    
4 Apr 2008  #752
what is the most used polish swear word in poland translated to english

you gone to bed
z_darius 14 | 3,973    
4 Apr 2008  #753
what is the most used polish swear word in poland translated to english

kurwa.
It means "whore" but is used a lot where English speaking fellas would say "shit", as in "oh shit" ~ "O kurwa"
osiol 55 | 3,923    
4 Apr 2008  #754
"O kurwa"

Not "A kurwa!" then?
Wyspianska    
4 Apr 2008  #755
you can even recitate whole alphabet before if you want. Kurwa is still the same kurwa.
plk123 8 | 4,161    
4 Apr 2008  #756
it can be 'a kurwa' at times. it depends what's going on. maybe that more of a slang though.
osiol 55 | 3,923    
4 Apr 2008  #757
you can even recitate whole alphabet

Where I work, the various plant beds are given a letter then a number, so there are A 1 to 12, B 1 to 10, C 1 to 8 and so on, all the way to the letter S. To make sure my Polish and Slovakian colleagues know where I am asking them to go, we have started using an ingenious new system.

C jak cipa
D jak dupa
H jak huj (okay, so I know it should start with C, but...)
K jak kurwa
P jak pierdolić

But there doesn't seem to be enough for the whole alphabet.

Why do I have to work with such coarse, vulgar people?
z_darius 14 | 3,973    
4 Apr 2008  #758
But there doesn't seem to be enough for the whole alphabet.

There aren't because of ą, ę, y and perhaps some other letters.
osiol 55 | 3,923    
4 Apr 2008  #759
We don't use those funny Polish letters to name beds on an English nursery.

What do you call the letter Y anyway?

Can anyone add anything to my alphabet of naughty words?
Bartolome 2 | 1,085    
4 Apr 2008  #760
A - no idea
B - burak - literally 'beetroot', but here = eejit
C - ciul = d!ck
D - debil = stronger for 'eejit'
E - no idea
F - fiut = d!ck
G - gówniarz (m)/gówniara (f) = something like 'sh!thead'
H - no idea (for a swearword)
I - idiota (m)/idiotka (f)
J - jebany (m)/jebana (f) (fuc.ed), jebaka, jebus (both exclusively for m; fuc.head)
K - kutas = d!ck

I'm not going to be some Evil Twisted Master Of Swearwords On This Forum, so I'll just stop here.
PolskaDoll 28 | 2,107    
4 Apr 2008  #761
B - burak - literally 'beetroot', but here = eejit

So how angry would you have to be to call someone a beetroot? :D
Eurola 4 | 1,911    
4 Apr 2008  #762
I don't think burak is as strong as eejit.
Burak is a simple, village person. The word is mostly used by a "city" person.
"Burak" may not be sophisticated in the city, but he/she is are darn smart burak in the village.
(they sure know how to grow their buraki - beets, which a city person would not have a clue about)
Easy_Terran 3 | 313    
5 Apr 2008  #763
Burak is a simple, village person

Yeah, burak could be an equivalent of redneck - simple, rude (cham, prostak)

E - no idea

eunuch :) (Polish pronunciation - ehw-nooh)

A - still nothing :)
MrBubbles 10 | 614    
5 Apr 2008  #764
How would you translate 'Kutwa' (with a t)? A friend suggested 'Pikey'
Magdalena 3 | 1,837    
5 Apr 2008  #765
kutwa is not a swear word as such. it means "miser".
Paddy 1 | 9    
5 Apr 2008  #766
So much for guidelines like: "Profanity: Profanity or using derogatory language is not allowed. Please keep your language suitable for all ages."[i][/i]
MrBubbles 10 | 614    
5 Apr 2008  #767
kutwa is not a swear word as such. it means "miser".

Could you turn it into an adjective? Kutwowy? Kutwony? Kutwowski?
z_darius 14 | 3,973    
5 Apr 2008  #768
You could, but that wouldn't be readily recognized. I never saw or heard these forms, but perhaps others did.

btw. "kutwa" does mean "miser", but at times it may be used as an euphemism for "kurwa". Other such softer versions of the expletive are kuźwa, kurtka, kurde.
AnotherGuest    
6 Apr 2008  #769
Better kutwiany than kutwowy,
kutwy than kutwony,
kutwiarski (similiar sound/declination to lichwiarski ) than kutwowski,

But more than kutwa is very rare in use indeed.

As to "a kurwa" and "o kurwa" i have to add some comments.

Exclamation started by "O" we use when something happend and we didn't expect that at all.

Started by "A" we use when we were sure that something must hapend but we weren't sure when. For example we looking for something and we suddenly found that item.

The quite different means for "o kurwa" and "a kurwa" when we want refuse something. At that case A or O mean the same - our lack of agreement but at that case A or O shoud be strongly accented: " Aaaaa! kurwa takiego ..."(here we dont talk anything more - all knows we could add at that place "wała" lub "chuja" but we are not so rude and still our emotions are controlled) lub "O! kurwa".

Regards
Bartolome 2 | 1,085    
6 Apr 2008  #770
So much for guidelines like: "Profanity: Profanity or using derogatory language is not allowed. Please keep your language suitable for all ages."[i][/i]

Check out WHO started this thread.
AnotherGuest    
6 Apr 2008  #771
People from Irleand like use polish word:WYPIERDALAĆwhen they order go out from the bar (after midnight) ^^It's stronger than spierdalać, but some people using it too often (it decrease the power of this ord)

Wypier... isn't stronger than spier.... Strengh depend on accent and voice tonation.

They slightly different each other at means. Wypier... mean live certain (limited) area in other way we are going to use our force to do that. If you live the area everything is ok.

Spier... mean do live unlimited area - everywhere we will find you, you will be in danger. Wypierdalać mean spierdalać stąd. "Stąd" define limited area( escape from that area - here - but you could stay there ) for that strong request.

Regards
z_darius 14 | 3,973    
6 Apr 2008  #772
Spier... mean do live unlimited area - everywhere we will find you, you will be in danger. Wypierdalać mean spierdalać stąd. "Stąd" define limited area( escape from that area - here - but you could stay there ) for that strong request.

I'm not sure I'd agree. Certainly not with the first one.

Speirdalaj is a generic invitation to piss off/fuck off. It doesn't have to have anything to do with space or location.

Wypierdalaj , in addition to its other meanings, is an encouragement which has to do mostly with space or location, but frankly, Polish linguists don't appear to devote a lot of time to the nuances in the meanings of either word.
AnotherGuest    
6 Apr 2008  #773
Wypierdalać, spierdalać isn't are insults in general. These are rude words which show that way the requested side is determined and don't afraid for final result.

The mild form of the similar request is "wyjść stąd" - go out.
But that way it could be receicved as bigger insult than first word. Some kind of rude men only respect strongest form of request and any gentle form is not valid for them or received even as kind of insult and could invoice them for greater rudiness or agression.

So the choice of the right form of the request is a form of poker game.
At that context wypierdalać, spierdalać mean a kind of poker and no futher requests will be. You can go out or brute force will decide.

I'm not sure I'd agree. Certainly not with the first one.Speirdalaj is a generic invitation to piss off/fuck off. It doesn't have to have anything to do with space or location.Wypierdalaj , in addition to its other meanings, is an encouragement which has to do mostly with space or location, but frankly, Polish linguists don't appear to devote a lot of time to the nuances in the meanings of either word.

Spierdalaj is a personal request/invitation adressed to given person.
Spierdalać is a the same kind of request invitation to all ppl which are at opposite site than mine.

So between good friends spierdalaj could mean the same as "odwal się" or even "daj mi spokój".
Spierdalać have quite different strengh. It mean i'm extremly angry ( ready for final game ) and it is addresed to my potenitial enemies ( if they deny this request).

Quite different meanings is when i use spierdalać instead of spierdalamy.
The last is invitation/command to my friends of course - we have to piss off / very fast go back etc. as we are in danger now, for example.

So the very important is kind of the ending -ać, could mean quite different than the same word ended by -aj.
AnotherGuest    
6 Apr 2008  #775
Do kogo ta mowa dziecino ?
;-)

That way word "dziecino" (little kid) could act as an insult this time.
And yours "Spierdalaj" if it is adressed to me for example i take as a form of high respect. You used strong request because you know the weaker could act as insult for me.

So now if you want assure me you dont afraid the confrontation with me you have to repeat your request plus add some strong insults at my direction.

Regards
Arise_St_George 9 | 419    
6 Apr 2008  #776
So now if you want assure me you dont afraid the confrontation with me you have to repeat your request plus add some strong insults at my direction.

Spierdalaj pedal :P
AnotherGuest    
6 Apr 2008  #777
So now if you want assure me you dont afraid the confrontation with me you have to repeat your request plus add some strong insults at my direction. Spierdalaj pedal

;-)
You have keep in mind polish endings are very important.

If your goal was to insult me You should write: "Spierdalaj pedale". What should create a good starting point to futher insults exchange.

But "Spierdalaj pedal" showing only your goal but at the same time showing your inability to operate efectively insults in polish.
So it is only funny for me at this time. It looks like you tried to talk to the object - "pedał" not a me human instance but even at that case you wrote "l" instead "ł" at the end.

If you will finish with "le" you could reach your goal. So you only lost one letter but your answer lost that way all its own aggression.

In fact it sound quite comic now, for native Polish belive me.

Conclusion: if you want to use polish insult for Polish in effective manner you have keep high attention at the endings.
In other way i could get impression i'm talking with machine, young child or mental disabled person. And that way you cant achive your goal - i will not be angry.

Regards
z_darius 14 | 3,973    
6 Apr 2008  #778
But "Spierdalaj pedal" showing only your goal but at the same time showing your inability to operate efectively insults in polish.

Actually, that kind of construct (expletive + Nominative) is also heard from native speakers of Polish. I think Arise_St_George's insult was effective.
Arise_St_George 9 | 419    
6 Apr 2008  #779
;-)You have keep in mind polish endings are very important.

Your "English" makes me laugh too lol

Chuj ci w dupe
AnotherGuest    
6 Apr 2008  #780
Your "English" makes me laugh too lolChuj ci w dupe

I'm not going to deny that ;-)
But it wasn't my goal to make you upset ;-)

Now i see you make a little progress.
So keep that course and
Good Luck ;-)



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