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Polish slang phrases - most popular.


pam    
27 Oct 2012  #481
Best i can do is " Taki Zimna Cholera". That's what it sounds like anyway. Something about the damn cold.
Someone Polish can probably correct me.
Lenka 2 | 1,067    
27 Oct 2012  #482
LilBitCountry
Do you know real phonetic simbols?From what you typed I only can see:
tʌtʃɪ ʃiːbnʌ hɒledʌ
And it sounds more like Czech than Polish.
Rysavy 10 | 308    
27 Oct 2012  #483
tachi szeebna holeda

Taki Dzie w ___ _____? I see Szee as Dzie. If you speak it sloppy like me.

And that could be a " A day In"

but it would be colleqial and not literally "in hell" (like my Hunny telling me to be very careful saying how much I like to have ice cream if I talk about it same way in Polish as I do English. I had him so cracked up. I guess it is allergorical for...<_< >_> BJ?)

It doesnt sound much like Bohemian in that context..but I havent heard it spoken since I was little
pam    
27 Oct 2012  #484
And it sounds more like Czech than Polish.

Hadn't thought of that! Just presumed she hadn't pronounced it correctly!
a.k.    
27 Oct 2012  #485
I see Szee as Dzie.

Have you heard "obrałem dziemnniaka" or "obrałem ciemniaka"? For those who don't know what the hell I am talking about, watch "The Potato Peelers" ;)

The phrase goes: "tak zimno, cholera!" or more likely "jak zimno, cholera!" (jak is read like yuk)
david_91 2 | 7    
15 Nov 2012  #486
Merged: Polish Slang (NO SWEARING!) :o)

Hey,

Im currently learning polish.....which is very hard..... :o
Because of what im learning.......whenever i speak to people in polish they smile or laugh....
They say i speak very formal.....and mature......
I would like to know different polish slang words that i can use instead.....

Correct Slang

EXAMPLE: Czesc = Siema

Please if possible, write how i pronounce it as well....

Dziekuke Bardzo :o)
Lenka 2 | 1,067    
15 Nov 2012  #487
Do widzenia-na razie-see you
pantsless 1 | 267    
15 Nov 2012  #488
Wow, you got that one wrong. How about you first tackle the tough ones like "czesc"?
Lenka 2 | 1,067    
15 Nov 2012  #489
Wow, you got that one wrong.

No,I didn't.
The casual form of "do widzenia" is "na razie" as well as "cześć".
kondzior 8 | 923    
16 Nov 2012  #490
The casual form of "do widzenia" is "a razie" as well as "czesc"

"Czesc" can be used both as "goodbye/farewell/see you", and as "hallo/hi/welcome". Casual form of both "dzien dobry" and "do widzenia".
Crispus 1 | 4    
16 Nov 2012  #491
"dresiarz" - to describe a guy whose outfit of choice is a tracksuit, who isn't necessarily smart but has big muscles to make up for that, and for whom three things are of utmost importance: "fura, skóra i komóra" (car, girl, and a cell phone). :-)
pantsless 1 | 267    
16 Nov 2012  #492
No,I didn't.

Yes, you did.

The casual form of "do widzenia" is "na razie" as well as "cześć".

That's correct. Register is important. You cannot substitute "na razie" for "do widzenia" and vice-versa.
Lenka 2 | 1,067    
16 Nov 2012  #493
If in formal situations you say do widzenia.
If you're talking with friends you say na razie.
This poster's friends told him he speaks too formally.And I gave him words that can make his language more casual.
jon357 65 | 13,616    
16 Nov 2012  #494
Or for goodbye, just 'pa'.
pantsless 1 | 267    
16 Nov 2012  #495
If in formal situations you say do widzenia.
If you're talking with friends you say na razie.

And that's called register. Duh.

Other informal substitutes for "na razie": trzymaj sie, pa, hej, zdrowko, hejka, do zobaczyska, nara, narka, do zoba, spierdalam

"dresiarz"

Not quite. But close.
sofijufka 2 | 191    
17 Nov 2012  #496
spierdalam

it's a vulgar word
pantsless 1 | 267    
17 Nov 2012  #497
Well sh1t, I thought that one would pass by unnoticed. Nonetheless, a suitable phrase in certain situations.
polish person2    
8 Feb 2013  #498
A list with many slang words and phrases and there are mp3s to all of them polish.study-time.org/polish-slang-insults.htm
crochetbitch88 2 | 84    
9 Feb 2013  #499
"fura, skóra i komóra" (car, girl, and a cell phone)

skóra is about leather - like leather jacket or leather seat upholstery in his fura
JSim    
28 Feb 2013  #500
My Dad used to say something to us kids when we were little....I remember it as: You good boy/girl proposco zatstraniez (phonetically spelled, of course). Any help is appreciated.
Piorun - | 659    
28 Feb 2013  #501
proposco zatstraniez

Don't know what the first word is but the second one is (zasraniec) :)

I think the phrase is (no prosze, zasraniec)
JSim    
1 Mar 2013  #502
Piorun
Thanks! Do you know what it means?? =)
Piorun - | 659    
1 Mar 2013  #503
Do you know what it means?? =)

I was wrong, in this context (You good boy/girl proposco zatstraniez) I think it’s (po prostu zasraniec) which means; (po prostu = simply) ( zasraniec = a rug rat), so whatever the first part is - of which I'm not too sure about, the second is definitely (zasraniec). Of course that’s not a literal translation but that’s the expression Americans use when they talk about toddlers and that’s exactly what zasraniec is in this case. In case it is my first thought after all than (no prosze, zasraniec = look, a rug rat).
BohdanBazooka    
17 May 2013  #504
It's a common trait of Polish slang to use a vocative case instead of the nominative, for example ''Jasiu'' instead of ''Jasio'' or ''Jaś'' (Johnny), ''misiu'' instead of ''miś'' or ''misio'' (teddy bear) or ''mistrzu''* instead of ''mistrz'' (''master''; I think the closest translation for ''mistrzu'' wolud be ''mastah'').

''Jasiu powiedział mi wczoraj, że...''
"Johnny told me yesterday that...''

*its even works better with incorrect spelling ''miszczu'' ;-)
mavi0090    
14 Jun 2013  #505
What does "takie tam" meaning in polish language?
Polonius3 1,007 | 12,507    
14 Jun 2013  #506
Different nondescript things; all and sundry; vague, unspecified things or events.
rkali    
3 Jul 2013  #507
What does 'chyba coś było :) ' mean?
Mrs B.    
5 Aug 2013  #508
Dzien dobry!

I am just trying to learn a little Polish so that I can help the Polish children in my class.

They like to say 'siemanko' instead of 'good morning' at register time. I understand that this is slang for 'hello', but is it disrespectful? I like them to speak 'Polish', but don't want them to think I am an idiot!
Polonius3 1,007 | 12,507    
5 Aug 2013  #509
It's pronoucned roughly like sheh-MAHN-ko. The first syllable is like the 'she' in shepherd or Shetland.
What is the age of your pupils?
Wulkan - | 3,280    
5 Aug 2013  #510
It's pronoucned roughly like sheh-MAHN-ko. The first syllable is like the 'she' in shepherd or Shetland.

I didn't see her asking for a pronunciation of siemanko (because she can hear the right sound of it from her pupils) and your "roughly" explanation of how it goes is quite a fail.



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