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Short Polish<->English translations


Lilana
5 Mar 2019  #661
hiya,

I was wondering if anyone quote translate 'book of colours' for me. it's for a little polish boy in my setting. Also if anyone knows any polish nursery rhymes would be very grateful

me again sorry.. would also like to no the translation for swing and slide. the child often uses what sounds like 'seesaw' for swing. was just wondering if this what they would use when in Poland?
Atch 17 | 2,843
5 Mar 2019  #662
Lilana, if you're not a Polish speaker, don't try communicating in Polish or translating into Polish for the child. It is not always possible to translate directly from English to Polish. Stick to English as otherwise you can end up teaching the child incorrect forms of his native language and that is not good. You could use Google Translate but it doesn't always get the grammar right. Polish grammar is very complex even in a short sentence or sequence of words. There can be up to seven different forms of a single noun such as 'swing' depending on how it's used in a sentence (and fourteen when you add the plural forms).

The child will see that the Book of Colours is a book of colours. He doesn't need it translated. I'm a trained Montessori teacher btw and I've taught a lot of children of different nationalities whose languages I didn't speak.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,671
5 Mar 2019  #663
Please don't Lilana. as a UK teacher, use Englsih not a mangled version of the poor child's language.

Anyway why would you do this? there must be other children who don't speak English at home.....aren't you supposed to teach them all in English? or are you going to mash up all their languages for them and confuse them? or just the Polish kid?

Surely this is not what you learn at teacher training?

oh wait ..'settting' - OK.. not much training then..
Atch 17 | 2,843
5 Mar 2019  #664
I don't think Lilana is a teacher (hope not anyway!), more likely a childcare assistant in a creche or nursery. She says 'setting' as opposed to classroom, or she might be a nanny/nursery nurse. Either way, she should stick to English.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,671
5 Mar 2019  #665
honestly it scares me, the level of training required to work in a nursery...
turantual
19 Mar 2019  #666
How to translate "circumvent" into Polish?

I used google translate and got the word "przechytrzyć." However, when I translate that back into English it means "outsmart" which is not quite the right meaning. Maybe "side step" is a better phrase? Does "krok boczny" have the same connotation in Polish as it does English?
mafketis 20 | 7,171
19 Mar 2019  #667
How to translate "circumvent" into Polish?

I would go with unikać or ominąć both of which mean something like 'avoid'. When asking about translations the more context you can give the better - translating words in a vacuum often means they won't fit where the asker wants them.
Ziemowit 12 | 3,479
19 Mar 2019  #668
The literal meanings of the English verb 'circumvent' in Polish are" obejść, obchodzić, ominąć (bypass, go around). The same would be true in the figurative meaning: obejść: (regułę, zasady). 'Przechytrzyć' might possibly be good in some contexts.

The Polish meaning is exactly as in Latin: circum <--> 'around' + venire <--> 'come'. For an exact translation, you should provide the full context.
KJL
20 Mar 2019  #669
In Polish, "viva!" as an exclamation for "long live" is spelled "wiwa"?
So, "Long live Duda! Long live the Third Republic" would translate as "Wiwa Duda! Wiwa Trzecia Rzeczpospolita!" ???
Do I need to change declensions?
Dziękuję!
kondzior 8 | 946
20 Mar 2019  #670
In Polish, "viva!" as an exclamation for "long live" is spelled "wiwa"?

No. There is not such a word in Polish.

So, "Long live Duda! Long live the Third Republic"?

No. "Wiwat Duda! Wiwat Trzecia Rzeczpospolita!"
mafketis 20 | 7,171
20 Mar 2019  #671
So, "Long live Duda! Long live the Third Republic" would translate as

"Long live" is "Niech żyje..." (Niech żyją for the plural).
Lyzko 22 | 6,538
20 Mar 2019  #672
"Niech ZYJE Rzeczpospolita Ludowa Polska!"
KJL
20 Mar 2019  #673
No. "Wiwat Duda! Wiwat Trzecia Rzeczpospolita!"

So "wiwat" is from the Latin "vivat" and it's good Polish?
mafketis 20 | 7,171
20 Mar 2019  #674
it's a noun, meaning something like (a) cheer, it can be turned into a verb wiwatować (meaning 'to cheer')

It's not super common... maybe more common in the plural? google turns up some things like..

"wiwaty dla króla" ([there were] cheers for the king)

"oklaski i wiwaty dla Jan Kowalskiego" (appaluse and cheers for Jan Kowalski)
Lyzko 22 | 6,538
20 Mar 2019  #675
Roughly, "Three cheers for....."

"Sto lat!" = Gesundheit! (After someone sneezes) or "For he's a jolly good fellow....!" when congratulating somebody upon their marriage, for example.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,671
25 Mar 2019  #676
Lyzko, get a grip, nobody says 'for he's a jolly good fellow' and haven't done for about 50 years
Lyzko 22 | 6,538
25 Mar 2019  #677
Get a grip....

At least mine's firm at the wheel, Delph!
Plenty of people say/sing that. Don't judge everyone by the under fifty crowd:-)
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,671
27 Mar 2019  #678
do you also teach your students that British people say 'raining cats and dogs'? hahahaha, move on, oldie.
nobody says 'for he's a jolly good fellow'
Lyzko 22 | 6,538
27 Mar 2019  #679
Again respectfully, it all depends on the crowd with which you hang along with their level of culture:-)
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,671
27 Mar 2019  #680
oh please, Lyzko, spare me the 'oh you're so uncultured' schtick, it's getting really tired.
You need to move on. Nobody says this.
Spike31 2 | 860
27 Mar 2019  #681
A Nobel prize winner for a daredevil who would translate it to English:


  • Difficult Polish Poem
koperwaspawel
7 Apr 2019  #682
Merged:

Please, translate the short text



,,Nie obiecuję ci wiele...
Bo tyle co prawie nic...
Najwyżej wiosenną zieleń...
I pogodne dni...
Najwyżej uśmiech na twarzy...
I dłoń w potrzebie...
Nie obiecuję ci wiele...
Bo tylko po prostu siebie...
Bolesław Leśmian
pawian 159 | 9,509
7 Apr 2019  #683
Shortly speaking: I haven`t got too much cash or property, but I still promise you will have fun with me, so be mine, darling.
Dougpol1 30 | 2,938
7 Apr 2019  #684
I haven`t got too much cash or property,

The writer obviously never heard of the English proverb: "When poverty comes in the door, love flies out the window." But then, that wouldn't be prose, would it?
pawian 159 | 9,509
7 Apr 2019  #685
Yes, but the proverb refers to couples who have been married/partners for some time, while the poster seems to be willing to strike a new romance using the translated poem.
Dougpol1 30 | 2,938
7 Apr 2019  #686
proverb refers to couples who have been married/partners for some time

Strictly speaking, yes, Pawian, but you are are being pedantic....
Only a Polish poem could be so hopelessy romantic and not of this age, akin to a seventies song by Marilyn McCoo and Billy Davis "You don't have to be a star.." Just as soppy, but more fun than poetry. Both of them are nonsense more often than not. No money - no romance.
pawian 159 | 9,509
7 Apr 2019  #687
According to Dead Poets` Society main hero, poetry has been created by males to woo females more effectively. It is natural those males didn`t have a lot of material resources to impress women with, so they resorted to poetry instead. No money, no romance, you say. I can`t agree - there are also romantic women who don`t care about money.
Lyzko 22 | 6,538
8 Apr 2019  #688
"Oh Captain, my captain....."

A reference obviously to the death of Lincoln!
mhurwicz 8 | 16
19 Apr 2019  #689
Merged:

się niepokoją (help with a word on a handwritten postcard)



I'm having trouble with a word on a handwritten postcard from 1940. The sentence is "Adek i Lotka nie mieli od Pana wiadomości bardzo długo i ??? się niepokoją." Basic meaning: "Adek and Lotka have not heard from you for a very long time and are very worried." But the missing word is clearly not "bardzo." (See attached image or, for the whole postcard, leonidhurwicz.org/letter-to-nachum/) Any help greatly appreciated!



Nathans
19 Apr 2019  #690
Could be the word: "szalenie" (wildly).


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