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Game - guess Polish idioms/sayings in direct English translation


Chemikiem 6 | 2,054
22 Sep 2019  #691
I know the proverb in which children are not mentioned.

I know it as this one:

Szewc bez butów chodzi.
OP pawian 161 | 9,906
22 Sep 2019  #692
To take over something, to take the reins?

Yes, exactly.

To tell sb to the hearing.
Chemikiem 6 | 2,054
24 Sep 2019  #693
I really have very little idea about this one. To gossip, or to disclose information about someone?
OP pawian 161 | 9,906
24 Sep 2019  #694
No, it means to rebuke sb.

I am going to gush/squirt with you. What does it mean?
Chemikiem 6 | 2,054
25 Sep 2019  #695
I'm going to run away with you?
OP pawian 161 | 9,906
25 Sep 2019  #696
Yes!

Sth is/functions/looks to things.
Chemikiem 6 | 2,054
26 Sep 2019  #697
Is there a better way of phrasing that one as I can't make any sense of it at all?
OP pawian 161 | 9,906
26 Sep 2019  #698
Sorry, that is a direct translation. :):)

But the rules here are less cruel than in Photo Riddle thread - when sb doesn`t know, we should explain immediately.

Do rzeczy means sth is good, worth taking, buying etc. . Also sb. She looks do rzeczy means attractive.

to have a nose.
Chemikiem 6 | 2,054
27 Sep 2019  #699
Do rzeczy

Nope, wouldn't have got that one. What is the idiom in its original Polish?

to have a nose.

For something? To know something well, predict something correctly?
mafketis 20 | 7,317
27 Sep 2019  #700
What is the idiom in its original Polish?

'do rzeczy' means "know what s/he wants", "self-assertive (in a good way)" etc I'm reminded of how an American woman once interviewed for a job where I worked... my boss approvingly called her "Baba do rzeczy" and employed her (unfortunately we couldn't compete price wise with her other jobs).
Chemikiem 6 | 2,054
27 Sep 2019  #701
'do rzeczy' means "know what s/he wants", "self-assertive (in a good way)"

Ok, thanks maf, I'm just trying to equate the meanings you and Pawian have given to:

Sth is/functions/looks to things.

I feel I've missed something there.
OP pawian 161 | 9,906
28 Sep 2019  #702
For something? To know something well, predict something correctly?

Yes!

to take one`s secret to the grave.
Chemikiem 6 | 2,054
29 Sep 2019  #703
To never reveal a secret to one's death? Or at least for a very long time ;)
OP pawian 161 | 9,906
29 Sep 2019  #704
Only to one`s death. No longer.

sb has been made bald.
Chemikiem 6 | 2,054
30 Sep 2019  #705
Somebody has been exposed for what they are? People can see what someone is really like?
OP pawian 161 | 9,906
30 Sep 2019  #706
Nope. It means sb feels stupid. Zrobiło mu się łyso.

So, you know! or So, you know?
Chemikiem 6 | 2,054
3 Oct 2019  #707
It means sb feels stupid.

OK, thanks for that.

So, you know! or So, you know?

Not much idea here. You know something, do tell?
OP pawian 161 | 9,906
3 Oct 2019  #708
No, it is an expression of annoyed criticism, like: How dare you? - No, wie pan! - oburzył się woźny.

to do sb from the hand/arm
Chemikiem 6 | 2,054
4 Oct 2019  #709
How dare you?

How dare you indeed! Nah, wouldn't have got that!

to do sb from the hand/arm

Oh dear, another one I've not much idea about. A couple of guesses:
Is it similar to twisting somebody's arm- to pressurize someone into doing something they don't want to? Or something is convenient for somebody?
OP pawian 161 | 9,906
4 Oct 2019  #710
Nope. To do means to serve sb, like in the office, for example. From hand means to do it instantly, without waiting in the line. Załatwić kogoś od ręki.
Chemikiem 6 | 2,054
4 Oct 2019  #711
Thanks for the explanation, these idioms are getting harder for me!
OP pawian 161 | 9,906
4 Oct 2019  #712
Yes, I know. That is why I am dealing with them in the English forum about Poland, not Polish forum about England.

I finally got home where the book by Niziurski lies on my desk, so a next one:

to act/work/function under the coating.

Before I forget:
What situations are called Mexico/ Saigon by Poles:?
Chemikiem 6 | 2,054
5 Oct 2019  #713
to act/work/function under the coating.

Is this similar to working under the table? To do something off the record so there's no official trace? To be off the radar?

What situations are called Mexico/ Saigon by Poles:?

Ones of disorder and confusion?
Lenka 3 | 1,545
5 Oct 2019  #714
Think more along spies...
Chemikiem 6 | 2,054
5 Oct 2019  #715
For the Mexico/Saigon situations or the other idiom?
mafketis 20 | 7,317
5 Oct 2019  #716
What situations are called Mexico/ Saigon by Poles:?

IIRC "Sajgon" refers to a place that's ben wrecked and "Meksyk" refers to general disorder... I haven't heard either in a long time.

One odd thing I think was/is the frequent use of the term "Mexico City" in Polish since Mexico isn't an English speaking country... but I haven't noticed Miasto Meksyk being used as frequently, much less Ciudad de Mexico or Distrito Federal ('federal district' which is what people in Mexico usually call it)
Lenka 3 | 1,545
5 Oct 2019  #717
The working under the coating.
Chemikiem 6 | 2,054
5 Oct 2019  #718
Think more along spies...

To be the eyes and ears for someone, an organisation etc? To report back to someone with information about certain activities etc?
Lenka 3 | 1,545
5 Oct 2019  #719
Nah, spies can't work openly so they...
OP pawian 161 | 9,906
5 Oct 2019  #720
Is this similar to working under the table?

Yes, that is quite correct. Simply speaking, under cover. I was sure I wrote coatling - płaszczyk - but now I see it is coating, still close but not what I really meant.

Ones of disorder and confusion?

Yes. Also chaos or even violence. I think Mexico idiom comes from Kraków. Meksyk was a bar in Nowa Huta District in communist times and it was infamous for rough customers, heavy drinking and frequent fighting. Saigon bears an obvious reference to the Vietnam war.

I haven't heard either in a long time.

I come across them regularly in online comments.





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