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Game - guess Polish idioms/sayings in direct English translation


OP pawian 161 | 9,907
17 Sep 2019  #661
Illustration



mafketis 20 | 7,317
17 Sep 2019  #662
to keep thumbs for sb

maybe better "to hold one's thumbs" (in German IIRC it's to 'press the thumbs' - in (American) English it's to cross one's fingers (for smn)
OP pawian 161 | 9,907
17 Sep 2019  #663
Yes, of course, you are right with this holding. I am already tired, I need to go to sleep earlier tonight, I am spending too much time here. :):) Due to the school deform, I have to get up at 6 am.

Goodnight.
Ziemowit 12 | 3,588
17 Sep 2019  #664
maybe better "to hold one's thumbs"

That's the kind of nuance which will always be difficult for a Polish speaker. When we say "trzymać", the first English equivalent that comes to mind is "keep" rather than "hold". I don't know why.
mafketis 20 | 7,317
17 Sep 2019  #665
Me either... I think of trzymać as physical (not sure if that's always true I'm pretty sure it's not) I think I learned 'trzymać' in a context where somebody was holding something and the context in which L2 words are learned tends to influence how learners think of them more (native speakers usually can't remember learning everyday words like trzymać or hold or keep)
OP pawian 161 | 9,907
18 Sep 2019  #666
The case is simple: hold is trzymać physically in hands or arms, keep is trzymać in more abstract contexts, like a pet at home. I was tired.
Chemikiem 6 | 2,054
18 Sep 2019  #667
to gypsy sth out of sb.

It's probably wrong, but is it to con or swindle somebody? Although I dislike the negative connotation there. No idea about the other gypsy one.

in (American) English it's to cross one's fingers (for smn)

It's the same in England too.
Ziemowit 12 | 3,588
18 Sep 2019  #668
The case is simple: hold is trzymać physically in hands or arms,

Holding your breath in... arms or hands?
OP pawian 161 | 9,907
18 Sep 2019  #669
Although I dislike the negative connotation there.

Yes about swindling. Yes, it isn`t nice but it still functions, although more and more rarely.
To gypsy means to lie.

to poison to sb.
kaprys 2 | 1,868
18 Sep 2019  #670
Actually I remember watching Sprawa dla reportera once and one of the problems they discussed was of a young Gypsy woman's and one of the guests was Bogdan Trojanek -that blonde Gypsy. And I'm pretty sure at some point he told her 'cyganisz'.
OP pawian 161 | 9,907
18 Sep 2019  #671
'cyganisz'.

Meant as you are lying.
kaprys 2 | 1,868
18 Sep 2019  #672
@pawian
Yeah. Used by a Gypsy.
Chemikiem 6 | 2,054
19 Sep 2019  #673
to poison to sb.

To poison someone's mind?
OP pawian 161 | 9,907
19 Sep 2019  #674
Nope, it means to bore sb to death with silly, stupid, uninteresting talk, often with reproachful context.

I didn`t win sth (e..g,a stomach in the book) in the lottery.
Chemikiem 6 | 2,054
20 Sep 2019  #675
I missed out in the luck stakes? Or healthwise?
OP pawian 161 | 9,907
21 Sep 2019  #676
Nope, it means I must take care of my things, health, body coz I have only one.

to mount one`s hobby horse.
Chemikiem 6 | 2,054
21 Sep 2019  #677
To get onto one's favourite topic of conversation?
OP pawian 161 | 9,907
21 Sep 2019  #678
Yes! Often connected with listeners bored to death... :)

sth(e.g., the flat) was turned over legs up
Chemikiem 6 | 2,054
21 Sep 2019  #679
Something was turned upside down? Ransacked?
OP pawian 161 | 9,907
21 Sep 2019  #680
Yes!

Edmund Niziurski, Klub Włóczykijów, 1980, the fourth edition, page 61

to put sb out Put out in the sense of extinguish.
Chemikiem 6 | 2,054
22 Sep 2019  #681
to put sb out Put out in the sense of extinguish.

Presuming it's not in the literal sense of the word, does it mean to subdue someone, to take the wind out of their sails?
Lyzko 23 | 6,627
22 Sep 2019  #682
Just remembered one of the first idioms, idiomatic sayings, I ever learned: MADRY POLAK PO SZKODZIE = ONE'S ALWAYS
WISER AFTER THE FACT, or something to that effect:-)
Chemikiem 6 | 2,054
22 Sep 2019  #683
Another:

A shoemaker walks without shoes
OP pawian 161 | 9,907
22 Sep 2019  #684
to take the wind out of their sails?

Yes, usually resulting with the extinguished person go silent, lose enthusiasm, become saddened etc..

MADRY POLAK PO SZKODZIE

It isn`t idiomatic, it is just a proverb - in literal translation - a wise Pole after a damage. :):)

A shoemaker walks without shoes

Another nice proverb. :):)

Doesn`t the English have a similar one? the shoemaker's children are ill-shod

about humans:to put the paw on sth
mafketis 20 | 7,317
22 Sep 2019  #685
the shoemaker's children

the version I know is just "the cobbler's children go barefoot" though there are many variants... often people just say "the cobbler's children..." (or "the shoemaker's children..) and the rest is understood, like "the best laid plans..."

Now I'm trying to think of Polish proverbs that are similarly abbreviated... can't think of any
Ziemowit 12 | 3,588
22 Sep 2019  #686
It isn`t idiomatic, it is just a proverb - in literal translation - a wise Pole after a damage.

Cieszy mię ten rym - mądr Polak po szkodzie
Lecz jeśli prawda i z tego nas zbodzie,
nową przypowieść Polak sobie kupi,
że i przed szkodą i po szkodzie głupi


Who wrote this?
Chemikiem 6 | 2,054
22 Sep 2019  #687
the shoemaker's children are ill-shod

I have never heard that one, although Google Translate gives that meaning for the literal translation from the original Polish, which I found bizarre to say the least, given that children aren't mentioned in the proverb. I don't normally use GT, but when I spoke to a friend about this yesterday, I used it to look up the meaning of szewc as she wanted to know what someone who made/repaired shoes was called ( cobbler or shoemaker ) in English.

to put the paw on sth

To take over something, to take the reins?
Chemikiem 6 | 2,054
22 Sep 2019  #688
Who wrote this?

Jan Kochanowski - Pieśń 5

the rest is understood, like "the best laid plans..."

Hmm. I was under the impression it meant that a person has no time for self because that person is too busy caring about others and so neglects himself.
Ziemowit 12 | 3,588
22 Sep 2019  #689
I have never heard that one,

Neither have I. And yes, I know the proverb in which children are not mentioned.

Jan Kochanowski - Pieśń 5

Very good! My favorite of his fraszka's is this one:

Jeśli nie grzeszysz jako mi powiadasz,
czemu się miła tak często spowiadasz?

OP pawian 161 | 9,907
22 Sep 2019  #690
Who wrote this?

Without googling, I remeber it was a poem called The Song About the Ravaging of Podole. I think I still remember that Polish lesson we were doing it on in high school. I only forgot it was Kochanowski. :)


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