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Game - guess Polish idioms/sayings in direct English translation


Feniks - | 221
19 Apr 2024 #1,591
This idiom has nothing to do with alcohol.
mafketis 37 | 10,848
19 Apr 2024 #1,592
What is meant by 'To not be in the sauce' ?

To be out of sorts, down, down in the dumps, not oneself etc.
Feniks - | 221
20 Apr 2024 #1,593
Yes. Well done maf.

I'm sure this next one will be too easy:

Don't turn my guitar around. What does it mean?
johnny reb 50 | 7,368
21 Apr 2024 #1,594
What is meant by 'To not be in the sauce' ?

"sauce" is a slang name for alcoholic beverages 🍸🍺

This idiom has nothing to do with alcohol.

I didn't say it did, you did. I said sauce is slang for alcohol.
Did ya get it that time ?

noun
thick liquid served with food, usually savory dishes, to add moistness and flavor:

informal
(the sauce)
alcoholic drink:
"she's been on the sauce for years"
Similar:
alcohol
liquor
strong drink
spirits
alcoholic drink
intoxicating drink
Feniks - | 221
21 Apr 2024 #1,595
I said sauce is slang for alcohol.

And? What relevance does that have to the Polish idiom?
johnny reb 50 | 7,368
21 Apr 2024 #1,596
Quit playing stupid and accept the fact that I answered your question politely.
I have heard my Polish relatives use that Polish idiom when I was a kid many many times.
You being a Brit most likely never heard of that and that is why you ask in the first place.
So ? now go argue that too, Karen. 👺
Maybe if you started going to church on Sunday mornings you could learn how to resolve some of your anger and hate issues.
mafketis 37 | 10,848
21 Apr 2024 #1,597
I answered your question politely.

But you were wrong!!!!!!
johnny reb 50 | 7,368
21 Apr 2024 #1,598
Actually I wasn't but if that is what you want to believe, who am I to pee in your cornflakes.
Lenka 5 | 3,525
21 Apr 2024 #1,599
you were wrong!!!!!!

Yes he was.
That slang expression had NOTHING to do with the idiom.
johnny reb 50 | 7,368
21 Apr 2024 #1,600
Yes he was.

No he wasn't.
Read what he posted again.

I didn't say it did, you did. I said sauce is slang for alcohol.
Did ya get it that time ?

Did ya get it that time because I don't want to have to tell you again.
mafketis 37 | 10,848
21 Apr 2024 #1,601
Yes he was.

Questioner: What is three cubed?

Respondent: There are three sides to a triangle!

Questioner: Wrong answer!

Respondent: No! I was right!!!!!
johnny reb 50 | 7,368
21 Apr 2024 #1,602
Respondent: No! I was right!!!!!

No, he was wrong because you said cubed, a triangle is not cubed. duh !
Come on maffy, you can do better than that.
I have an idea, lets argue all day to see if we can attack, belittle, diminish and shame J.R. somehow.
Are there any other intellectual adults here besides Novi ?
mafketis 37 | 10,848
21 Apr 2024 #1,603
No, he was wrong

A specific question was asked... about the meaning of the Polish idiom 'nie w sosie' "not in (the) sauce"

You contributed a completely irrelavant point without guessing the meaning of the idiom.

You were wrong.
OP pawian 223 | 24,582
21 Apr 2024 #1,604
Yes, coz I used to use it a lot in 1980s when it came into being.

It means not to worry. Stop sweating so much, sort of.

1- not all people have your passion for puzzles

Today people are lazy. While Feniks is an old style intellectual who loves using her brain all the time. Just like me. Very few people like that are left in the world. :(:(:(:(

4- the forum is slowly dying out

Yes, it is very slow when we remember it started about 15 years ago when social media like Facebook emerged. Yet, we are still alive. Ha!!!!
mafketis 37 | 10,848
21 Apr 2024 #1,605
Don't turn my guitar around

Stop bothering me....
OP pawian 223 | 24,582
21 Apr 2024 #1,606
Don't turn my guitar around
Stop bothering me...

I first read it in the book published in 1976 but whose plot takes place in mid 1960s. An amateur reporter tried to interview a female worker in a weaving plant but she was busy with work and told him to get lost. He called her nasty names in revenge.

That was the time when big beat became popular in Poland, too, and possessing an electric guitar was a dream of many youngsters.
Feniks - | 221
21 Apr 2024 #1,607
It means not to worry.

Of course. I'm sure my idioms are very easy for you though.

my Polish relatives use that Polish idiom when I was a kid many many times.

If your imaginary Polish relatives had used that Polish Idiom then you should know it has nothing to do with alcohol. Keep arguing the toss though, it's good entertainment value!!

Stop bothering me....

Correct again maf :)
OP pawian 223 | 24,582
21 Apr 2024 #1,608
I'm sure my idioms are very easy for you though.

That is why I generally prefer to abstain from replying to your idioms. Like Lenka. I always hope a not native Pole or Poless will do. ;):):
Feniks - | 221
21 Apr 2024 #1,609
I always hope a not native Pole or Poless will do. ;):):

maf generally contributes but I always tend to think of him as an honorary Pole as he's been in the country for so long. He probably knows a lot of the idioms too. Most of the males on here seem to be preoccupied with war and gun threads and of course there are only 4 women here.
OP pawian 223 | 24,582
21 Apr 2024 #1,610
an honorary Pole

That`s what I meant - non-native Pole or Poless. Maf is a patriotic Pole born in the US.
OP pawian 223 | 24,582
22 Apr 2024 #1,611
I often heard this from a close family member:Are you waiting for the applause??? What does it mean? And who used to say it to me?
mafketis 37 | 10,848
22 Apr 2024 #1,612
:Are you waiting for the applause???

Maybe parents? They think you're not doing something fast enough?

I had assumed that it wasn't applause per se but more like clapping your hands to get a servant's attention....
OP pawian 223 | 24,582
22 Apr 2024 #1,613
Maybe parents? They think you're not doing something fast enough?

Exactly! My mum used to say it when I was delaying or thinking of sth else instead of getting down to work

like clapping your hands

Yes, clapping is used in the Polish idiom.

to get a servant's attention....

No, I always associated that clapping with sth else. What namely?? Let it be the second part of the riddle.
OP pawian 223 | 24,582
25 Apr 2024 #1,614
For those who plough for us! What does it mean?
OP pawian 223 | 24,582
27 Apr 2024 #1,615
For those who plough for us!

I have just checked if it exists on the net. No, it doesn`t.
Hint - I read it in books by Marek Hłasko or Bogdan Loebl written in 1960s.
Feniks - | 221
27 Apr 2024 #1,616
No, it doesn`t.

I know. I did a search in Polish ages ago.

I read it in books by Marek Hłasko or Bogdan Loebl written in 1960s.

Great! I can spend hours guessing which author and which books!

Is the meaning a dedication? As in for those who came before and did the hard work to make things easier?
OP pawian 223 | 24,582
27 Apr 2024 #1,617
Is the meaning a dedication? As in for those who came before and did the hard work to make things easier?

No, it isn`t a metaphor. It is simply a toast by drinking people used in early communist times. The toast was for peasants who together with workers and working intelligentsia best represented the Polish nation then. :):):)

The toast was ironic mockery, of course - drinkers who uttered it had the peasant class in deep disregard. :):):)

In Polish - za tych co nam orzą!
Feniks - | 221
28 Apr 2024 #1,618
It is simply a toast by drinking people used in early communist times.

Not a chance I would have got that. Especially given there's no trace of it on the net. Thanks for the explanation!
gumishu 15 | 6,186
28 Apr 2024 #1,619
In Polish - za tych co nam orzą!

za tych co nam orzą is simply a deliberate alteration/corruption/mockery of the toast "za tych co na morzu" (it's obvious by the sound and look of the toast) ("za tych co na morzu roughly means "to those on the sea" or whatever preposition you use in that case in English)


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