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Game - guess Polish idioms/sayings in direct English translation


OP pawian 159 | 9,428
8 Sep 2019  #631
No. To jinx - say a bad prophesy which becomes reality.

To wet the snout. in the sense of muzzle, of course.
Chemikiem 6 | 1,888
10 Sep 2019  #632
To wet the snout.

I don't think it's right but does it mean to have a drink? An alcoholic one?
Atch 17 | 2,839
10 Sep 2019  #633
That sounds right to me, a bit like the phrase in English 'to wet the baby's head' meaning to have a celebratory drink when a baby is born.
Chemikiem 6 | 1,888
10 Sep 2019  #634
I was thinking more along the lines of 'to wet your whistle', but English and Polish idioms aren't always similar, so I'm not convinced it's right yet!
mafketis 20 | 7,159
10 Sep 2019  #635
Well, using animal terms about adult people is usually insulting, so I'm going to say it's more like 'guzzle down' or 'lap up' (like a cat) and refers to someone drinking at the slightest provocation (not to mark a special occasion or relief after a long hard day).
Chemikiem 6 | 1,888
10 Sep 2019  #636
Or it could be to have one's nose/snout in the trough - to get as much available money as possible, but I think this is more unlikely than my first guess.
Atch 17 | 2,839
10 Sep 2019  #637
Or could it be a bit like 'to dip a toe in the water'?? To wet your snout, give something a tentative try?

'to wet your whistle

That sounds right, We'll see :)
OP pawian 159 | 9,428
10 Sep 2019  #638
I don't think it's right but does it mean to have a drink? An alcoholic one?

Yes, exactly, and in the sense of long binge when said: moczyć ryja instead of umoczyć ryja. Taken from a patriotic film about two dipsos and a history teacher. hahaha. When they start boozing, the teacher proves a bigger drinker than the two.

to twist something`s head.
OP pawian 159 | 9,428
10 Sep 2019  #639
From the film, too: since lark to frog.
Chemikiem 6 | 1,888
10 Sep 2019  #640
since lark to frog.

From morning till night, as in people worked from a.m to p.m? The lark will sing in the morning and the frog croaks in the evening.

to twist something`s head.

To turn someone's head, to influence someone so as to significantly change behaviour? I know you put something and not somebody in the idiom, but I can't think of anything else.
OP pawian 159 | 9,428
10 Sep 2019  #641
Yes about lark and frog.

As for twisting sth`s head, it means to finish sth definitely - to break the neck of a problem, sort of. I was thinking about other verbs instead of twist but decided to keep it as that is the original version.

What do we mean by saying:It is the sky and/vs the earth.
Chemikiem 6 | 1,888
11 Sep 2019  #642
it means to finish sth definitely - to break the neck of a problem, sort of.

I wouldn't have got that one, thanks.

:It is the sky and/vs the earth.

In respect of people for example, to be completely different from each other? Two things that are opposites? We would say ' like chalk and cheese'.
OP pawian 159 | 9,428
11 Sep 2019  #643
yes!

Idioms from another book by Niziurski which I have just finished reading to kids - Klub Włóczykijów. Do you know it? :):)

sb is stuffed. What does it mean?
Chemikiem 6 | 1,888
2 days ago  #644
Do you know it? :):)

No I don't.

What does it mean?

Is 'stuffed' in the sense of being full up?
OP pawian 159 | 9,428
2 days ago  #645
Sorry, that would be too easy. I meant nadziany as affluent, not full up. :):)

sb is burnt. (not burnt out).
Chemikiem 6 | 1,888
2 days ago  #646
Suffering unpleasant consequences for their actions and therefore reluctant to make the same mistake/s again?
OP pawian 159 | 9,428
2 days ago  #647
Nope. Burnt in the book means sb has lost respect of other people due to his/her irresponsible behaviour/ actions. Also applies to spies etc.

sth is into the plank.
Chemikiem 6 | 1,888
1 day ago  #648
sb has lost respect of other people due to his/her irresponsible behaviour/ actions.

Ok, thanks for the explanation.
Unfortunately, I have no idea about the plank idiom :(
OP pawian 159 | 9,428
1 day ago  #649
W dechę means very good, attractive, perfectly suitable for our needs.

The suggestion is into the plank.

when sb squirts/gushes what does it mean as an idiom?
Chemikiem 6 | 1,888
17 hrs ago  #650
W dechę means very good, attractive, perfectly suitable for our needs.

Ok, thanks.

sb squirts/gushes what does it mean as an idiom?

Somebody is overemotional? Overly enthusiastic?
OP pawian 159 | 9,428
16 hrs ago  #651
Nope, it means running away fast.

What did Polish students mean when they said: a bomb?
Chemikiem 6 | 1,888
5 hrs ago  #652
it means running away fast.

Wouldn't have got that one, very obscure!

a bomb?

Something's excellent, great?
OP pawian 159 | 9,428
2 hrs ago  #653
This prysnąć actually means to start running away.

As for a bomb, no, the opposite - it meant an F. Just like the barrel (in a rifle, e.g.)

to make a balloon of sb.
mafketis 20 | 7,159
2 hrs ago  #654
As for a bomb, no, the opposite - it meant an F

IINM it used to mean the opposite... interesting.


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