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Game - guess Polish idioms/sayings in direct English translation


johnny reb 16 | 3,367
26 Jun 2019  #451
you made it worse by making all song and dance about it.

Haven't you ever noticed that school teachers just can't seem to take constructive criticism ?
Lyzko 20 | 6,320
26 Jun 2019  #452
....maybe because (certain) pupils see fit to cop an attititude, forgetting who in the end remains the ultimate
authority in the classroom:-) The time a teacher, professor, instructor feels they must defer to every trouble
maker who comes down the pike, is clearly the time for that person to pack it in and look for another line
of work!

Just what, pray, do you consider "constructive" criticism vs. simply getting on somebody's case?
OP pawian 154 | 8,546
26 Jun 2019  #453
Yes, in real life I also meet such students, either as a regular teacher or class tutor. When a trouble maker is caught doing sth wrong in class or even illegal on the school grounds, they immediately deny all allegations. Who? Me? How do you know? Did you see it? Why are you picking on me? You are wrong again!

They are able to twist everything around so shrewdly that some teachers give up and let them off.

Some of our friends here behave in a similar way. That is sad that old mature people act like that. Mature?
Lenka 2 | 1,103
26 Jun 2019  #454
She was quite straighforward. :)

Oh yeah, she isn't one to beat around the bush :)
She had a friend who once who described their mutual friend this way
'She had more di*** in her ass than the Chinese have army'..
I was always torn between disgust at the awful language and admiration for the crude poetry.

That friend was a teacher btw :)

did you mum say that when she wanted you to do something but you were being lazy or too busy doing something else perhaps?

Usually when we asked her to do something for us that she judged as cheeky. Like lets say if we are sitting around and we want a sandwich and ask her to make it at an age when we are fully capable of making them ourselves.
Chemikiem 6 | 1,656
27 Jun 2019  #455
It is singular, (leg) pulling their leg, pulling your leg, pulling my leg, pulling his/her leg.

You are correct, except that you should have said in your example above pulling their legs, as the use of 'their' refers to more than one person, as Pawian was when he was talking about his students, not one student. Or do you think students have only only one leg between them? Aside from this, the whole thread is about Polish idioms translated into English. Pulling someone's leg was not an idiom for people to guess the meaning of, but you knew that anyway. Another attempt to trash a great thread.

@ Pawian, I answered your last riddle in post #440

ask her to make it at an age when we are fully capable of making them ourselves.

Yeah, I guess we all were guilty of trying to wriggle out of doing the boring stuff as kids!
OP pawian 154 | 8,546
27 Jun 2019  #456
pulling their legs, as the use of 'their' refers to more than one person, as Pawian was when he was talking about his students

So, now I don`t know what to think about it. Did I make a mistake or not? :):) Could I write pulling their legs or not? Because Johhny said it must always be a leg and he`s an expert in linguistics after all.

The equivalent of running around like a blue-arsed fly?

Yes! Very good counterpart. Even that slight vulgarity of the phrase has been retained. I must remember it. :)

to let sb go in (their) socks only.
Chemikiem 6 | 1,656
27 Jun 2019  #457
now I don`t know what to think about it.

To be honest, I've never heard anyone use that saying in the plural. I've only ever heard ' I'm pulling your leg, she or he is pulling your leg, you're pulling my leg. I've never really used that term, I would be more likely to say ' I'm winding you up, he/she is winding you up ' etc, but many people do still use that idiom. I'm not going to have a grammar discussion as I don't want to see the thread shut; it appears many posts were moved from it yesterday.

I will have to think about the socks idiom, nothing immediately comes to mind.
mafketis 19 | 6,890
27 Jun 2019  #458
I've never heard anyone use that saying in the plural.

I have and might use it myself if I'm talking about a group having... their legs pulled.

"I'm just pulling your legs". or "She was just pulling their legs" (referring to a group of people)

jr has yet to contribute anything about poland to these forums it's all interpersonal drahma
johnny reb 16 | 3,367
27 Jun 2019  #459
you should have said in your example above pulling their legs, as the use of 'their' refers to more than one person,

True however you would still say pulling their leg. Pulling the classrooms leg, pulling the students leg, etc.
I have an idea.....why not Google "pulling their legs" and see what you come up with just for giggles.
I rest my case.

jr has yet to contribute anything about poland

Because when I do it just gets deleted so I gave up. Why waste my time ?
And it is spelled 'drama' that you just added to your post needlessly to BAIT with Buckwheat, not I.
Chemikiem 6 | 1,656
27 Jun 2019  #460
to let sb go in (their) socks only.

Is this something to do with humiliation? To leave somebody exposed?
OP pawian 154 | 8,546
27 Jun 2019  #461
No, humiliation through exposing isn`t the motive here.
mafketis 19 | 6,890
27 Jun 2019  #462
Because when I do it just gets deleted so I gave up

then why on earth are you still here? (nb that's a hint that you should leave)
Lyzko 20 | 6,320
27 Jun 2019  #463
Speaking of pulling teachers' legs, seems Messrs. Bojo and The Donald are past masters at giving
their teachers a hard time, Donny Boy going so far as to punch out one of them out!
Guess the rest of us need that proverbial wooden stump at the ready, just like in the good ol' days, if
any of our charges got out of hand LOL
johnny reb 16 | 3,367
27 Jun 2019  #464
then why on earth are you still here?

Same reason you are I guess.
I may have to put my foot down soon if the well goes dry. lol
Lenka 2 | 1,103
28 Jun 2019  #465
You do realise it's about Polish idioms or you kust don't care you are trashing another thread?
Chemikiem 6 | 1,656
28 Jun 2019  #466
to let sb go in (their) socks only.

To deprive someone of everything they own? Take them to the cleaners?

you kust don't care you are trashing another thread?

I don't think he'll be happy until it's closed. He hasn't contributed anything to this forum, just tries to ruin it for everybody else.
OP pawian 154 | 8,546
28 Jun 2019  #467
To deprive someone of everything they own?

Yes! Once it was probably used only about gamblers who bet their garment and lost it all except socks. Today it also applies to other situations, e.g., bankruptcy or enforced debt collection.

This one is tricky
to thump/thud with a thick pipe.
Lenka 2 | 1,103
28 Jun 2019  #468
Are you sure pipe is the right word here?
OP pawian 154 | 8,546
28 Jun 2019  #469
Do you prefer tube? :) I was thinking about it but pipe is better.
johnny reb 16 | 3,367
28 Jun 2019  #470
You do realise it's about Polish idioms

Absolutely - I just wanted to straighten your buddy out on his mistake.

or you kust don't care you are trashing another thread?

I'll take your trolling Bait as you have been throwing it out there all week looking for a fight with me.
Actually it is YOU and your cohort that have started all the drama here over nothing.
You two are Nudne jak flaki z olejem.
Lenka 2 | 1,103
28 Jun 2019  #471
True... I always connected it mire with military...
Chemikiem 6 | 1,656
29 Jun 2019  #472
to thump/thud with a thick pipe.

Hmm. This one is right out of left field, but in the UK we have a saying, 'subtle as a brick', and I'm wondering if this is similar. To be blunt and straight to the point, speak in a direct manner, take no prisoners etc etc.

Other than that I have no idea!
OP pawian 154 | 8,546
29 Jun 2019  #473
A very good answer, as usual. :):)

I am watching how the rabbit is racing to and fro my bedroom, she`s crazy but it`s so funny, and a new one is coming to mind:

to move like a fly in tar
Chemikiem 6 | 1,656
29 Jun 2019  #474
Like wading through treacle? Although that seems at odds with a rabbit racing around to be honest.
OP pawian 154 | 8,546
29 Jun 2019  #475
Yes. As for the congruity of the idiom with rabbit racing, I thought of an opposite meaning. :):) Remember, we already talked about that blue arsed fly.

This month I am reading a book for teen kids to my teen kids. The author- Niziurski, my fav when I was their age and even later on. I see it is a mine of idioms, some probably lost their past popularity, but if sb used them today, he/she should still be understood.

E..g, to have a healthy/good poppy head.
Chemikiem 6 | 1,656
30 Jun 2019  #476
I'm struggling with this one. I can't get the significance of poppies :(
OP pawian 154 | 8,546
30 Jun 2019  #477
Check what poppy head means in colloquial Polish.

Before I forget - this idiom was used in another thread: to lick one`s wounds.
Lenka 2 | 1,103
1 Jul 2019  #478
What about:
sb is liks a flag in the wind?
johnny reb 16 | 3,367
1 Jul 2019  #479
My guess would be a person without any direction in life.
Lenka 2 | 1,103
1 Jul 2019  #480
Good thinking but think more along values.


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